Lebanese celebrate Christmas with mixed feelings

The political situations has meant that no government has been form.
Updated 25 December 2018
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Lebanese celebrate Christmas with mixed feelings

  • Patriarch Bechara Boutros Al-Rahi has urged Lebanese politicians in his sermons to avoid further delays to the formation of a government

BEIRUT: As Lebanese prepare to celebrate Christmas, this year’s festivities are mixed with disappointment and fear that 2018 will pass without the formation of a government.

The Maronite Patriarchate’s media spokesman Walid Ghayyad told Arab News that Patriarch Bechara Boutros Al-Rahi has urged Lebanese politicians in his sermons to avoid further delays to the formation of a government.

Housewife Nawal told Arab News: “We usually dedicate a big budget to buy presents during the festive season, but this year we agreed to buy gifts only for the children. The economic and political situation makes us reluctant to spend money, and we’ve decided to save our money for a rainy day.”

Toni Eid, chairman of the Beirut Traders Association, told Arab News: “The political crisis in Lebanon has had a negative impact on the economic situation. Crises aren’t new to Lebanon, but this is the first time that Lebanese feel this much distress.”

He said: “There’s a general feeling that this is a serious crisis. People are waiting for solutions, and no decisions are being made for the future. People’s spending has decreased.”

He added: “One of the indicators of economic decline is offering sales in excess of 50 percent. This doesn’t usually happen during the festive season.”

Eid said: “The middle class has declined, while the rich have maintained their place and the poor have become poorer.”

Economic reporter Danielle Daher said she noticed during her tours of markets a decline in consumer spending.

“Designer shops that sell expensive brands are almost empty,” she told Arab News, adding that families are buying “clothes instead of toys for children because the latter are expensive.”

Al-Rahi said in his Sunday sermon: “Human dignity requires the existence of social conditions that enable people to secure a dignified life. Unfortunately, political officials fail to realize this duty. They’ve been stalling the formation of the government for seven months, creating new problems every time a solution is found. In doing so, they inflict great damage on the state, causing serious financial losses and violating the dignity of the people by condemning them to more poverty, deprivation and anxiety. Do they realize that they’re committing a great crime against the state and the people? Aren’t they ashamed?”

He stressed the importance of forming a government comprising people “with recognized competence and neutrality who meet the requirements of the state and the people.”


Thousands protest in Algiers despite tight security

Updated 20 September 2019

Thousands protest in Algiers despite tight security

  • Salah on Wednesday ordered police to block protesters from outside Algiers entering the capital to boost numbers at the anti-regime rallies
  • Friday's protest marked Algeria's 31st consecutive week of rallies

ALGIERS: Thousands of protesters took to the streets of the Algerian capital on Friday in defiance of a heavy security presence to demand the ouster of the country's army chief.
Demonstrators gathered near the capital's main post office square, the epicentre of Algeria's protest movement that forced longtime president Abdelaziz Bouteflika to step down in April, this time calling for the ouster of General Ahmed Gaid Salah.
"The people want the fall of Gaid Salah," the strongman in post-Bouteflika Algeria, they chanted. "Take us all to prison, the people will not stop."
Friday's protest marked Algeria's 31st consecutive week of rallies, but protesters faced a heavy deployment of security forces in the city centre and along its main avenues.
Salah on Wednesday ordered police to block protesters from outside Algiers entering the capital to boost numbers at the anti-regime rallies.
The tougher line on protests came just days after interim president Abdelkader Bensalah announced a December 12 date for a presidential election to fill the vacuum left by Bouteflika's departure.
The army chief has led the push for polls by the end of 2019, despite mass protests demanding political reforms and the removal of the former president's loyalists -- including Gaid Salah himself -- before any vote.
In the runup to the latest rally, as on previous Fridays, police made several arrests near the square, AFP photographers said.
Police stopped vehicles on main streets in the capital and an AFP journalist saw officers in plainclothes ask for identity papers, before some were led off to nearby vans.
As a police helicopter scoured the skies, security forces also stopped cars headed towards the city centre from its southwest entrance, where a dozen anti-riot police vans were stationed.
Said Salhi, deputy head of the Algerian League for the Defence of Human Rights, condemned the heightened security measures as "illegal".
Demonstrations have officially been banned in Algiers since 2001 but the prohibition had been ignored since rallies started on February 22 against the ailing Bouteflika's bid for a fifth presidential term.