Startup of the Week: Going eco-friendly in your own trendy style

Allaf carefully designs the garments based on the various styles of individuals
Updated 01 January 2019

Startup of the Week: Going eco-friendly in your own trendy style

  • Allaf carefully designs the garments based on the various styles of individuals

The Untitled Project is an eco-friendly clothing line dedicated to offering the most unique and stylish abayas — the loose-fitting, full-lengths robes usually worn by Arab women.
Israa Allaf, a 21-year-old Saudi marketing student, launched the clothing line on Sept. 25, 2018. She also holds a diploma in graphic design. Allaf says she has always been passionate about fashion. She had been planning to start her own business since 2017.
“The Untitled Project is your go-to source for styles influenced by the latest fashions with an added flair. We aim to inspire our customers to be the best version of themselves and to be confident in their own skin — and of course, their outfits. We are dedicated to choosing and handpicking fabrics designed to reflect individuality while maintaining quality and offering below-market prices to our young customers,” Allaf said.
The store sells exclusively through pop-up events. It attends selected events and places and sells limited pieces.
Currently, the store is based in Jeddah but Allaf is planning to go online by the end of 2019 so as to expand its outreach globally.
The Untitled Project uses Italian fabrics usually Italian linens or organic fabrics from Lithuania.
The garments the store offers such as abayas, cardigans, clothes, coats and organic handmade scarfs are all eco-friendly, said Allaf.
“The clothes are also produced in a stable and safe environment with suitable conditions for labor. The brand is A-Z sustainable — the racks, the stand, the boxes, packaging (no plastic) are made of recycled items.”
Allaf carefully designs the garments based on the various styles of individuals.
“Clothes are like people. We are all unique in our own sense of personal style,” she said.
“According to to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, based on research there are 16 personality types that can be narrowed down to six, so that is exactly what we did but with personal styles,” Allaf added.
She did her research and came up with six styles that harmonize with people’s taste. These styles include trendy, bohemian, classic, sporty, chic, and dramatic.
Allaf explained the reasoned behind the brand’s name. “The Untitled Project will help you send your message, we have no name, no logo. We are Untitled. Here, your style speaks for itself.”
The Untitled Project is also a community of supportive girls all gathered for a cause and purpose, said Allaf.
“We have many activities where both men and women can show their support and be part of The Untitled Project mission. The Untitled Project is more than just an abaya brand, it is a movement and anyone can join our cause.”
The Untitled Project can be found on Instagram (@theuntitledproject.ksa).


Indian label Two Point Two makes catwalk debut at LFW

Founder of Two Point Two Anvita Sharma presented her first catwalk show outside of India this week. (Supplied)
Updated 17 February 2020

Indian label Two Point Two makes catwalk debut at LFW

LONDON: “Two Point Two is a genderless, anti-conformist, all-inclusive brand. We don’t cater to any particular gender or any particular size,” declared designer Anvita Sharma at London Fashion Week’s Fashion Scout.

Some might say packing all that into a dress is a pretty big challenge, but this is something she clearly believes in.

This is Two Point Two’s first runway show outside India. (Supplied)

“We believe in diversity, independence and confidence and we support individuals who want to be as loud or mellow as possible. So we have a huge variety of colors, silhouettes and details,” she said.

Sharma, who studied at Istituto Marangoni in Milan and Paris, is a rising talent. Last year she won the third edition of “Scouting for India,” a global project developed by Vogue Talents in collaboration with FAD International Academy and FAD Institute of Luxury Fashion & Style.

The collection used wool and wool felt, shot cotton and wool and some Giza cottons for the shirts and dresses. (Supplied)

Her win included the opportunity to showcase her Spring/Summer 2020 collection at the Palazzo Cusani within the exhibition celebrating Vogue Talent’s 10th anniversary during Milan Fashion Week.

This week, amid the hectic backstage preparations for her Fashion Scout showing, she found the time to talk to Arab News, running us through her color palette and fabrics.

“We have a mix of neutrals and pastels as well as vibrant reds. Some shades are often categorized as either feminine or masculine, so we want to amalgamate both of them to say that colors are not supposed to be associated with any particular gender, color or race,” she explained.

The color palette was a mix of neutrals and pastels as well as vibrant reds. (Supplied)

“For fabrics, we have mostly used wool and wool felt, shot cotton and wool and some Giza cottons for the shirts and dresses. We have also done a lot of hand embroidery. One coat took four weeks to hand embroider,” she said.

The production for Two Point Two is based in Delhi.

For her next collection, Sharma is going to work with craft clusters of Indian women weavers based in the mountain city of Kullu, capital of the Kullu district in the Indian state of Himachal Pradesh.

She has a track record of being supportive of hand crafts — evident in her previous collections.

The production for Two Point Two is based in Delhi. (Supplied)

“Last season, we did handwoven fabrics of cotton and silk from another region in India. Now Two Point Two wants to bring different, dying crafts of India to an international audience,” she explained.

Commenting on her increasingly high profile, she said: “It’s very frantic and because I’m a perfectionist it really gets to me at times. I am happy to be here because it is London Fashion Week. This is our first runway show outside India — so we are very excited.”