Fake News Watch - Sharjah police, Jordanian government and Egyptian military

gypt military colonel Tamer Rifai dismissed reports that an attack targeted a vehicle in North Sinai and urged media outlets to strive for media accuracy. (AFP)
Updated 01 January 2019

Fake News Watch - Sharjah police, Jordanian government and Egyptian military

LONDON: Arab News examines a weekly round-up of fake news doing the rounds.

1 Sharjah police deny radars destroyed by gunshots
Sharjah police have clarified the truth behind photos showing speed radars destroyed by gunshots that have gone viral on social media. Their response came after images indicating that a number of radars situated on some of the streets outside the emirate were destroyed by gunshots.
Police said on Twitter that the images were from November 2012 and that the perpetrators had been brought to justice.

2 Jordanian government denies increase in bread prices
The Jordanian government denied it planned to increase bread prices in local markets, saying that what is rumored on social media is “incorrect”. The government made its comments through its electronic platform “your right to know.”
Social media users had been sharing that Jordan’s Deputy Prime Minister Rajaei Al-Muasher had threatened to resign unless his request to raise prices was agreed.
“Deputy Prime Minister Rajaei Al-Muasher did not sign his resignation ... and the government has no intention of raising the price of bread,” the government said.

3 Egypt military refutes alleged attack on army vehicle in North Sinai
Egypt military colonel Tamer Rifai dismissed reports that an attack targeted a vehicle in North Sinai and urged media outlets to strive for accuracy while covering military operations.


CEO buying struggling New Zealand media company for $1

Updated 6 min 3 sec ago

CEO buying struggling New Zealand media company for $1

  • The organization Stuff prints many of the nation’s daily newspapers

WELLINGTON: One of New Zealand’s largest media organizations is being sold for a single dollar to its CEO, the owners announced Monday.

The organization Stuff prints many of the nation’s daily newspapers and runs a popular news website of the same name. It employs about 900 staff, including 400 journalists.

Owned by Australia’s Nine Entertainment, Stuff faced financial challenges before the coronavirus pandemic struck and has since seen advertising revenues plunge.

In a statement to the Australian stock market, Nine said Stuff would be sold to CEO Sinead Boucher in a management buyout deal that will be completed by the end of the month.

“We have always said that we believe it is important for Stuff to have local ownership and it is our firm view that this is the best outcome for competition and consumers in New Zealand,” said Hugh Marks, the CEO of Nine.

Boucher said she’s been “blown away” by the positive feedback she’s been receiving about the purchase.

“I feel really happy, relieved and proud. It’s been a really intense couple of weeks getting to the finish line,” she said.

Boucher, 49, began her career as a reporter for The Press newspaper in Christchurch and later helped lead some of the company’s digital innovations.

She said she has no immediate plans for any staff reductions or newspaper closures, although added the ownership change isn’t a silver bullet to cure the issues that Stuff and other media companies are facing.

Boucher said she would look to increase revenues from online readers. Stuff last month set up an option for readers to donate money.

Boucher said she is purchasing Stuff through a limited liability company and is working through the details of a plan to transition the ownership by giving staff a direct stake as shareholders in the company.

The deal brings to an end the efforts of rival media company NZME to buy Stuff.

Discussions between the two companies turned acrimonious and ended up in the hands of lawyers. The High Court last week declined an interim injunction sought by NZME that could have delayed the sale to Boucher.

Nine said that as part of the deal, it will retain ownership of a printing plant in Wellington and lease it back to Stuff. It will also get some of the profits from the recent sale of company offshoot Stuff Fibre, an Internet provider.

Most New Zealand media companies have been struggling since the pandemic struck. Stuff has temporarily cut employee’s pay while NZME has announced plans to cut 200 jobs.