High-end holidays: A look at some of the world’s most exclusive luxury destinations

Viceroy Bali. (Supplied)
Updated 10 January 2019

High-end holidays: A look at some of the world’s most exclusive luxury destinations

  • A list of luxurious travel spots
  • Destinations all over the world

DUBAI: Here are some of the world’s most luxurious holiday spots:

Fogo Island Inn, Newfoundland, Canada
From $1,493
Fancy a stay at the end of the world? This boutique hotel on a remote island isn’t easy to get to (quickest way: charter a helicopter), but it’s well worth the journey for the astonishing views and the opportunity — through a sponsorship program — to spend time with locals and really get to explore the area’s culture. Of course, that’s optional, you’re equally welcome to simply lounge around in one of the rooftop hot tubs as well. This really is a place for lovers of the outdoors and nature, though. Take advantage of the guided hikes and the knowledgeable, mostly local, staff and lose yourself in the sparse beauty and unique atmosphere of Fogo Island.

Viceroy Bali, Indonesia
From $818
Recently voted the world’s best resort by readers of Condé Nast Traveler, the Viceroy is situated in the “Valley of Kings,” close to Ubud, and offers jaw-dropping views of the gorgeous jungle landscape and wildlife that surrounds the 25-room resort. The private villas, spa, fine dining and acclaimed customer service combine to offer a truly spectacular experience that should appeal to romantics and adventurers alike, and has resulted in almost-unanimous top ratings for the Viceroy in online reviews.

Constance Moofushi, Maldives
From $1,300
This all-inclusive resort on a small private island is perfect for those looking for a beachside escape, especially watersport enthusiasts — the resort boasts its own house reef, but is also less than an hour’s boat ride from some of the best diving spots in the world. Constance Moofushi has 110 rooms, all with great sea views, although some are more equal than others, perched directly above the water. This isn’t a destination for culture vultures, but if you want to lounge around in the sun and sand, sampling some great food and drink, then this idyllic resort will take some beating.

Pikaia Lodge Galapagos, Ecuador
From $4,680 for 3 nights (minimum stay)
“Designed for the environmentally conscious, physically active and adventurous traveler,” according to its website, this beautiful destination is situated in every evolution fan’s favorite location, the Galapagos Islands, and offers a — for once non-clichéd — once-in-a-lifetime experience in one of the world’s most bio-diverse environments. The islands’ otherworldly landscapes are magnificent, and the 14-room Pikaia Lodge is perfectly placed (on top of two extinct volcanic craters, 450 meters above sea level) to afford guests the best possible views of them. Set in 31 hectares, including a private wild giant tortoise reserve, Pikaia Lodge claims to have its own mosquito-free microclimate.

Shangri-La Barr al Jissah Resort & Spa, Oman
From $233
This resort combines two hotels — Al Waha (262 rooms) and Al Bandar (198 rooms) — both with breathtaking views over the waters of the Arabian Gulf and the cliffs that enclose the resort’s beaches in its private inlet, accessed via a man-made tunnel through the mountains. Snorkel in the turquoise sea and track sea-turtles, or simply lounge on some of the finest beaches in the Gulf. For the more adventurous, there are plenty of opportunities, from kite-surfing and kayaking to jet-packing. The resort boasts nine restaurants as well as an art gallery, and shops selling local crafts. Those in search of pampering should visit CHI, The Spa, which offers a vitality hydro pool, herbal steam room and an ice fountain, alongside its 12 treatment villas. This is luxury at a bargain price.

Necker Island, British Virgin Islands
From $77,500 per night for exclusive use
If you’ve got the cash to splash, then you and 29 friends can rent this private island as your exclusive holiday resort from owner Richard Branson. As you’d expect, for that price you get some serious ‘barefoot luxury’ to enjoy — from the abundant local wildlife, great sailing, diving and swimming locations, through yoga, tennis and kitesurfing, to spa treatments, and themed parties on some evenings. If you save a bit of space in your suitcase, you can also help the local community by bringing in medical supplies or educational aid. There are also a few excursions available to nearby islands.

The Oberoi Vanyavilas, Ranthambhore, India
From $603
A few hours drive from Delhi this classy retreat has the feel of an old-school safari camp (only with air-conditioning and high-speed Internet). With spacious private tents situated among mango and lemon groves, featuring teak floors, canopied four-poster beds, and standalone, claw-foot bathtubs — and each serviced by a personal butler, of course — visitors will feel like they’ve gone back in time. You may well be greeted by elephants on arrival, and on the twice-daily game drives, you could spot leopards, bears and even tigers — or take the river safari to track down the Gharial, India’s endangered crocodilian. Romantics, meanwhile, can treat themselves to a three-hour couples massage at the spa.

Bunga Raya Island Resort, Malaysia
From $1,245
A secluded hideaway just off the coast of Borneo, this small resort island consists of 47 sumptuous hillside villas (fully equipped with all mod cons) with views out over the beach to the South China Sea. Explore the tropical jungle — either on foot (one four-hour trek will take you across the whole island), or by zip line — and the warm waters, by sailboat, kayak or paddleboard. Scuba diving is also available. Wind down at the spa, which offers both Asian and Western treatments. Guests can order a romantic private meal in a beach pavilion, or dine at one of the resort’s well-reviewed restaurants, some of which require a boat journey to reach.

 


Russian museum CEO: Archaeology in Saudi Arabia is at its peak

Since the launch of the Vision 2030 reform plans, many steps have been taken to present Saudi Arabia’s ancient wonders such as Al-Gara Mountain in Al-Ahsa to the world. (Shutterstock)
Updated 15 October 2019

Russian museum CEO: Archaeology in Saudi Arabia is at its peak

  • Undiscovered archaeological treasures key to cooperation between Saudi Arabia and Russia

MOSCOW: Archaeology in Saudi Arabia has seen an unprecedented number of discoveries and findings in recent years. With over 44 Saudi and international missions working in the Kingdom this year alone, Russia’s State Hermitage Museum director, Mikhail Piotrovsky, commended the country’s efforts in presenting its hidden treasures to the world.
Arab News met with the director in Moscow to discuss the future of archaeology in Saudi Arabia and his interest in hosting one of its most famous exhibits, “AlUla: Wonder of Arabia.”
Piotrovsky, the urbane general director of the State Hermitage Museum located in Saint Petersburg, was appointed in 1992 by decree of the prime minister at the time.
He has a long history with the museum.
He took up the position following his father, Boris Piotrovsky, who was director from 1964 until his death in 1990.
Piotrovsky’s work at the museum is inspired by both his passion for the arts and a deeply rooted adoration for archaeology.
A graduate of Leningrad University, he spent a year taking part in archaeological explorations in Yemen, the Caucuses and central Asia, with over 200 scholarly publications, including catalogues of Arabic manuscripts.
A fluent Arabic speaker, he dedicated many years of his career to the archaeology of the Arab world, the spiritual and political history of Islam and Arab culture as well as medieval works and ancient inscriptions.
He told Arab News how the school of archaeology is always developing, and in order to achieve success in any excursion, it is key that teams coordinate with others to learn from their experiences.
“It is a very international field. If it is not, it will become too narrow and nationalistic,” Piotrovsky said.
“Archaeological departments are the most open bodies in every country. Be it Russia, Egypt, Iraq or Saudi Arabia, they are accustomed to working with different points of view and people from other civilizations. Openness is important for achieving success.”
The director said that many archaeologists from the Kingdom have been invited by the museum to partake in expeditions alongside Russian archaeologists to gain experience and exchange knowledge.
“AlUla is one of the jewels of archaeology,” he said. “It is a rare site, the Nabataeans controlled the routes from south to north. The Romans, Indians, ancient Palmyrians and Bedouins have been there.” The director told Arab News that they have been working in joint teams not only in archaeological diggings but also with plans to develop what they call an “archaeological park.”

NUMBER

4.5m - people visited the State Hermitage Museum.

The Russian State Hermitage Museum tells the story of Russia, its palaces, Peter the Great and many more significant historical moments. The museum also exhibits artifacts of different civilizations: Islamic, Buddhist, Catholic and others.
The museum’s message and goal is for “different civilizations to speak to each other and to us and make a connection,” he exclaimed.
Piotrovsky believes the same concept can be developed for AlUla.
Speaking to Arab News last January, Dr. Abdullah Al-Zahrani, general director of archaeological research studies at the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage, said that digs in Saudi Arabia are increasing at an unprecedented rate.
“Archaeology in the Kingdom is on the rise,” said the director.
“There is still a lot to be discovered and we are still in the period where you begin to dig and make a discovery, dig more and make another discovery. In the Arab world, everything is new and holds a base for the development of knowledge.”
Piotrovsky has been following the progress of archaeology in the Arab world for many years and he said that more archaeologists are going to Saudi Arabia now than at any point in the past 10 years.
Antiquities discovered in the Kingdom are known to come from one of the oldest areas of human settlements, with discoveries dating back 1.2 million years. In this past year alone, 15 new sites were discovered across the country.

FASTFACT

85,000-year-old discovery of a rare fossilized finger bone in the Nefud Desert is the oldest human fossil on record unearthed.

“It is a very important region which is still undiscovered properly. We all know the first man, according to our theories, was born in Africa and then we see its traces moving to Europe and Asia through the Arabian Peninsula,” said Piotrovsky.
“Ancient archaeology is very important but I think for this time period it should be the archaeology of the written period. Archaeology of the trade routes, coming from India and Africa, trade routes from Iraq and Palestine and Syria. There were fantastic kingdoms and sites.”
The museum’s keen interest in Saudi Arabia’s archaeological findings are a reflection of the director’s move to enhance cooperation between the countries.
It is planning on bringing the Kingdom’s first international exhibition dedicated to the human and natural heritage of AlUla titled “AlUla: Wonder of Arabia” to Saint Petersburg.
In 2011, the museum hosted the third leg of the “Saudi Archaeological Masterpieces through the Ages” exhibition after the successful exhibitions at the Louvre Museum in Paris and the La Caixa Foundation in Barcelona.
Aimed to introduce the historical and cultural importance of the Kingdom, the 450 relics were displayed for the first time outside of Saudi Arabia. They date back to a time between the Palaeolithic era and the pre-Islamic ages.
Since the launch of the Vision 2030 reform plans, many steps have been taken to present Saudi Arabia’s modern culture and ancient wonders to the world.
There is history lying beneath the Kingdom’s vast sand dunes, and a dig will not suffice, there is more to be done for the world to connect with the Kingdom.
“Opening up to the world is a little bit dangerous, but a museum recipe is a good one,” said Piotrovsky.