Expat newlyweds die in Maldives honeymoon horror

Both were expat nurses based in Singapore and Saudi Arabia. (Facebook/Leomar Lagradilla)
Updated 15 January 2019

Expat newlyweds die in Maldives honeymoon horror

  • The couple were snorkeling at a resort in Maldives’ Dhiffushi island when they drowned
  • The Philippine diplomatic mission in Dhaka is arranging the repatriation of the bodies of the two victims

DUBAI: A Saudi-based Filipina nurse and her newlywed husband drowned while snorkeling on their honeymoon in the Maldives on Sunday, officials have confirmed.

Highschool sweethearts Leomar Lagradilla, 30, and his wife Erika Joyce, 29, were snorkeling at a resort in Maldives’ Dhiffushi island when they drowned, UAE daily Gulf News reported.

They were taken to a local hospital, but were pronounced dead on arrival.

"They cannot give the full details why my brother and sister-in-law drowned. As of now, nobody from the hotel has messaged us what really happened," Lagradilla’s sister said in an interview on a local radio program.

Lagradilla and Joyce, who were nurses based in Singapore and Saudi Arabia respectively, married in the Philippines on Dec. 18, before flying to the Maldives on Jan. 9 for their honeymoon.

The Philippine diplomatic mission in Dhaka is arranging the repatriation of the bodies of the two victims, which according to the couple’s friends would cost $23,000.

An online fundraising campaign has been created to raise the money, but Philippine officials have vowed to meet the costs. 


Israeli jeweler makes $1.5m gold coronavirus mask

Updated 11 August 2020

Israeli jeweler makes $1.5m gold coronavirus mask

  • The 18-karat white gold mask will be decorated with 3,600 white and black diamonds
  • The Israeli company says it will be the world’s most expensive coronavirus mask

MOTZA: An Israeli jewelry company is working on what it says will be the world’s most expensive coronavirus mask, a gold, diamond-encrusted face covering with a price tag of $1.5 million.

The 18-karat white gold mask will be decorated with 3,600 white and black diamonds and fitted with top-rated N99 filters at the request of the buyer, said designer Isaac Levy.

Levy, owner of the Yvel company, said the buyer had two other demands: that it be completed by the end of the year, and that it would be the priciest in the world. That last condition, he said, “was the easiest to fulfill.”

He declined to identify the buyer, but said he was a Chinese businessman living in the United States.

The glitzed-up face mask may lend some pizzazz to the protective gear now mandatory in public spaces in many countries. But at 270 grams (over half a pound) — nearly 100 times that of a typical surgical mask — it is not likely to be a practical accessory to wear.

n an interview at his factory near Jerusalem, Levy showed off several pieces of the mask, covered in diamonds. One gold plate had a hole for the filter.

“Money maybe doesn’t buy everything, but if it can buy a very expensive COVID-19 mask and the guy wants to wear it and walk around and get the attention, he should be happy with that,” Levy said.

Such an ostentatious mask might also rub some the wrong way at a time when millions of people around the world are out of work or suffering economically. Levy said that while he would not wear it himself, he was thankful for the opportunity.

“I am happy that this mask gave us enough work for our employees to be able to provide their jobs in very challenging times like these times right now,” he said.