Solar boats and electric buses: Take a ride on the UAE’s eco-friendly transportation

Solar boats and electric buses: Take a ride on the UAE’s eco-friendly transportation
Ancient meets modern as abras, or traditional boats, ferry passengers across Dubai Creek. Some journeys are now being made in solar-powered vessels, part of a series of eco-friendly public transport initiatives in the UAE. (Getty Images)
Updated 17 January 2019

Solar boats and electric buses: Take a ride on the UAE’s eco-friendly transportation

Solar boats and electric buses: Take a ride on the UAE’s eco-friendly transportation
  • The UAE is starting to power its public transport with renewable energy, setting a sustainable example for the wider Gulf
  • Dubai is home to the first utility-scale solar project in the Middle East

DUBAI: Want to take a trip to the future using eco-friendly transportation? In the UAE, you can enjoy a ride on a solar-powered abra on Dubai Creek, or hop on an electric bus in the capital. 

While Abu Dhabi Sustainability Week is shining a light on big renewable energy projects, some more practical uses are already underway in the UAE, serving as a taster of the ground-breaking initiatives the Gulf is expected to witness as it moves toward a sustainable future.

Dubai’s Roads and Transport Authority has just launched an electric 20-seater water taxi, powered by a 20-kilowatt (kW) motor with solar panels on top. 

It has 87 percent lower emissions than regular abras, with expected operations on Dubai Creek, Jumeirah Beach, the new islands and the Dubai Water Canal. A total of 61 boats are planned by 2020.

Back on the road, work is underway in Dubai on two solar-powered bus shelters as part of a trial for shelters in locations off the electric power grid. 

The solar power generated will be used to operate lights, air-conditioners and billboards.

In Abu Dhabi, Masdar has launched the first electric passenger bus in the region. The Eco-Bus will serve a six-stop route between Marina Mall, Abu Dhabi Central Bus Station and Masdar City, with a free service until the end of March. 

Seating 30 passengers, it has a range of 150 km per battery charge, with solar panels used to power its auxiliary systems.




An abra awaits passengers on Dubai Creek. (Getty Images)

With experts predicting that global solar installations will grow steadily in the coming years — by 5.2 percent annually between 2017 and 2022 — the combination of batteries, solar and other renewables is expected to cause a dramatic transformation in the world’s energy markets. Some of this is already trickling down to street level.

“Buses, taxis and other fleet vehicles are driven continuously, contributing more to urban pollution than vehicles of similar engine sizes,” said Stephen King, lecturer in media at Middlesex University Dubai and a UAE-based member of the Climate Reality Project, a non-profit organization involved in education and advocacy related to climate change. 

“Providing electric options for these vehicles is a positive step in improving air quality, which is a key issue (in the Gulf).”

According to the Climate Reality Project, several studies show that electric vehicles are likely to cost the same as, or even less than, regular internal combustion vehicles within the next decade, even without incentives. 

A February 2017 report from Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) found that the unsubsidized total cost of ownership of battery electric vehicles will fall below that of internal combustion engine vehicles by 2022. 

From there, the report projected a steadily increasing rate of adoption, reaching global sales of 41 million — 25 percent of the total market share — by 2040. 

“Solar is quite suitable for meeting small local loads without a grid connection, and electric buses are increasingly popular around the world because their running costs are low compared with internal combustion engines,” said Jenny Chase, head of solar at BNEF. 

“Solar power can take on a role in mostly bulk energy generation in the daytime. Solar photovoltaics (PV) is now one of the lowest-cost generation options in sunny regions, with prices below $25 per megawatt (MW) in sunny areas, where political stability makes the cost of capital low.”

Chase said it is now possible to generate energy without significant carbon dioxide emissions, for close to — or even less than — the cost of generating from fossil fuels. 

“This will be incredibly attractive to utilities and governments. The Middle East (is likely to) build solar power plants for a large chunk of its electricity demand increase in the future, at least until the daytime need is well met,” she said.

“Electric vehicles for public transport are also likely to be used increasingly, possibly lagging adoption in oil-rich countries where the fuel costs are less.” 




Masdar’s electric passenger bus is a first for the Gulf region. (Getty Images)

China, for example, already has 400,000 e-buses. “Some batteries will probably be used for shifting demand to the daytime, and e-vehicles will be encouraged to charge in the daytime,” Chase said. “There will also be some rooftop solar adoption where government policy supports it.”

Saudi Arabia also sees the potential in solar. The Kingdom’s Renewable Energy Project Development Office plans to tender 11 PV power projects, with a combined capacity of 2,225 MW this year. 

The Kingdom’s solar target for 2023 has been increased from 5.9 gigawatts (GW) to 20 GW, and set at 40 GW for 2030. 

Last year, the Saudi Electricity Co. signed a deal with the Tokyo Electric Power Co., Nissan Motor Co. and Takaoka Toko Co. for the first electric vehicle pilot project in the Kingdom. As part of the agreement, fast-charger stations will charge vehicles in 30 minutes. 

The potential is high. Experts in 2002 tipped that the global solar market would grow 1 GW annually by 2010. The actual growth in 2010 turned out to be 17 times that. 

“The world installed a record 98 GW of solar PV capacity in 2017, far more than the net additions of any other technology — renewable, fossil fuel or nuclear,” King said. 

“Although solar energy technologies have been around for decades, it is only in recent years that installations have really started to take off,” he said. “Falling costs, technological improvements, increased competition and government incentives have been key drivers of this growth.”

Global solar capacity is said to have surpassed 400 GW for the first time in 2017. Although countries such as China, Japan, Germany, the US and India have historically been the largest players, solar growth in coming years is expected to depend increasingly on middle-income countries and emerging markets. 

“Clearly, what was once a niche technology is now firmly in the mainstream,” King said. “Solar has a lot of potential in the region and around the world, and a number of important projects have been initiated in recent years.”

The BNEF report also revealed that the global energy storage market is projected to double six times between 2016 and 2030, rising to 125-305 GW per hour. 

“This is a similar trajectory to the remarkable expansion that the solar industry went through from 2000 to 2015, in which the share of PV as a percentage of total generation doubled seven times,” King said. 

“Energy storage, both utility scale and behind the meter, will be a crucial source of flexibility throughout this period, and will be essential to integrating increasing levels of renewable energy.”

But when it comes to achieving six hours of full electricity production per day, challenges remain. 

Kyle Weber, an associate at Evera, which aims to identify and address key sustainability gaps in the mobility sector, said: “It is a resource that requires a lot of understanding to utilize well.

“In the case of an electric bus, you need to store the energy between when it’s generated and when it’s utilized, which means more cost, complexity, and things that can go wrong.”

On buses, Evera is looking into charging batteries outside a vehicle slowly during the day, before swapping them in and out of the vehicle while it is being used. 

“Solar is also great for things like process heat. Heat can be used to do all sorts of things from cooking to generating steam, and desalinating water to powering a pump or producing clean hydrogen,” Weber said.

* * *

 

The solar projects in the region

The Gulf is wholeheartedly adopting solar power to meet some of its energy needs. Several projects are underway across the region, including the UAE, where there are plans to increase power-generation capacity by around 21 GW, and where solar capacity is expected to contribute
26.1 percent of the total additional generation capacity. 

According to the Climate Reality Project, the world’s largest concentrated solar plant is due to be completed by 2021 near Dubai and is expected to have a 1,000-MW capacity. 

Dubai is home to the first utility-scale solar project in the Middle East. The UAE has 5.45 GW of new solar projects in development as of March 2017, and the Mohammed bin Rashid Al-Maktoum Solar Park is expected to be the largest concentrated solar plant in the world when it is completed in 2030. 

Dubai aims to produce 75 percent of its energy from clean sources by 2050, and its target energy mix for 2030 consists of 25 percent solar.

The Moroccan Solar Energy Plan aims to install 2 GW of solar power by 2020. On completion, the concentrated solar power complex will generate more than 500 MW of renewable electricity for 1.1 million Moroccans by 2018, reducing carbon emissions by 760,00 tons annually.

By 2020, Egypt aims to develop 40 solar parks of around 50 MW to meet its 2-GW renewables target, with clean energy accounting for 20 percent of the country’s energy mix. Its first utility-scale solar plant, credited to the government-sponsored feed-in tariff, will generate power for up to 15,000 homes. 

Decoder

What is an abra?

An abra is a small traditional wooden boat, almost like a raft, in the Gulf. It comes from the Arabic word “abara,” which means “to cross.” In Dubai, the Roads and Transport Authority uses motorized abras to ferry people across Dubai Creek.


Dior is set to stage its first exhibition in the Middle East

Dior is set to stage its first exhibition in the Middle East
The "Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams" exhibition at Victoria & Albert Museum in London. Getty Images
Updated 04 August 2021

Dior is set to stage its first exhibition in the Middle East

Dior is set to stage its first exhibition in the Middle East

DUBAI: “Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams” is a new fashion exhibition coming to Doha, Qatar, later this year. Designed specifically for the Middle East, the forthcoming exhibition is a celebration of the Parisian maison, which is turning 75 in December.

Mark your calendars, for the exhibition will take place from November 2021 until March 2022 at Doha’s M7 art center following successful stops in Paris, London and Shanghai.

The iconic Dior Bar suit. Getty Images

With special curation by Olivier Gabet, the Director of the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, the hotly-anticipated exhibition will feature a lineup of memorable pieces that have defined the heritage fashion house, such as the iconic Bar Jacket, an iconic garment instantly-recognizable by its cinched waist from Monsieur Dior’s revolutionary 1947 collection as well as other objects that fashion enthusiasts will revel in.

Also on display will be original sketches by the legendary designer for his couture collections, a baccarat blue crystal limited edition Miss Dior perfume bottle from 1947 and haute couture creations by succeeding Dior creative directors such as John Galliano, Raf Simons and Yves Saint Laurent.


Jessica Alba, Zac Efron star in new Dubai Tourism campaign

Jessica Alba, Zac Efron star in new Dubai Tourism campaign
Jessica Alba and Zac Efron co-star in the spoof action film. Instagram
Updated 04 August 2021

Jessica Alba, Zac Efron star in new Dubai Tourism campaign

Jessica Alba, Zac Efron star in new Dubai Tourism campaign

DUBAI: US actors Jessica Alba and Zac Efron are the most recent superstars to be tapped by Dubai Tourism for its latest tourism campaign and short film. 

The ad, which is a spoof of an action film, features Alba and Efron fighting off enemies in well-known landmarks across the city, such as the Burj Khalifa and the Museum of the Future. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Zac Efron (@zacefron)

The ad campaign also sees the Hollywood duo skydive off a helipad on the Burj Al-Arab, dine at Pierchic and navigate through the historic neighborhood of Al-Fahidi on scooters. 

The action-filled clip begins with the pair at Burj Al-Arab’s SAL restaurant, while a voiceover of Alba can be heard saying, “You’re just always putting work first.”

“Look I don’t want to fight with you,” responds Efron as the on-screen couple dine at Pierchic.  “He might,” he adds after a motorbike blasts through the restaurant.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Zac Efron (@zacefron)

Also featured in the ad is Caroline Labouchere, a Dubai-based model.

Efron posted the trailer on his Instagram page, alongside the cheeky caption: “She’s always getting me out of trouble.”

Alba, 40, also posted the trailer with the caption, “He’s always getting me into more trouble…”

Efron and Alba offered a glimpse of their project with Dubai Tourism earlier this week on Instagram.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Jessica Alba (@jessicaalba)

The “High School Musical” actor posted a behind-the-scenes still to his Instagram account, tagging Craig Gillespie, the Australian director who has worked on films including “I, Tonya” and, most recently, “Cruella.”

The ad was reportedly shot in the emirate in February.

At the time, images circulated on social media of the “Baywatch” star surrounded by film crew members on the beach in Jumeirah, close to the Burj Al-Arab.

Dubai Tourism is no stranger to recruiting A-listers to feature in promotional videos. 

Past stars to feature in campaigns include Bollywood star Shah Rukh Khan and US actress Gwyneth Paltrow.

In 2019, Khan invited Paltrow to Dubai as part of his #BeMyGuest campaign.

Later that year, the Goop founder returned to Dubai to film a tourism campaign and short film, “A Story Takes Flight,” alongside Hollywood stars Zoe Saldana and Kate Hudson. 


Why this retired engineer is a ‘model’ Saudi citizen

The models include typical houses and traditional shops that served fava beans, barbecued meat, kebabs and mabshoor, a traditional Arab dish of bread in a meat or vegetable broth. (Photos/Huda Bashatah)
The models include typical houses and traditional shops that served fava beans, barbecued meat, kebabs and mabshoor, a traditional Arab dish of bread in a meat or vegetable broth. (Photos/Huda Bashatah)
Updated 04 August 2021

Why this retired engineer is a ‘model’ Saudi citizen

The models include typical houses and traditional shops that served fava beans, barbecued meat, kebabs and mabshoor, a traditional Arab dish of bread in a meat or vegetable broth. (Photos/Huda Bashatah)
  • Abdul Aziz Taher Al-Hebshi aims to preserve the history of social and cultural life in Saudi Arabia
  • Makkah in those days was a beacon for writers, poets and scientists

MAKKAH: A Saudi agricultural engineer is spending his retirement years helping to preserve the Kingdom’s architectural and cultural history — in the form of extremely accurate models of important buildings and sites in Jeddah and Makkah.

Now Abdul Aziz Taher Al-Hebshi has turned his house in Jeddah’s Al-Rawdah neighborhood into an exhibition space to showcase his models, which represent a fascinating record of daily social and cultural life in the cities in the early-to-mid 20th century.
A good example of this is his model of a “writer’s cafe” in the Misfalah neighborhood of Makkah that was once popular with writers, intellectuals and poets. Through it, he said, he aims to immortalize the role these figures played in the development of literature in Saudi Arabia and the country’s cultural history.
“Knowledgeable people told me that the cafe where Makkah’s writers, poets and intellectuals used to go to was Saleh Abdulhay Cafe, located next to Bajrad Cafe,” 72-year-old Al-Hebshi told Arab News. “Similar cafes were found throughout Makkah’s Misfalah neighborhood in the past.”
He said culture and literature thrived in Makkah in those days, along with the study of science and the quest for knowledge. The city was therefore a beacon for writers, poets and scientists, and the Saleh Abdulhay Cafe was one of the places where they could gather for intellectual and cultural discussions.
“Among the cultural and intellectual figures that used to go to the writer’s cafe … was the Saudi Minister of Culture Mohammed Abdu Yamani,” he said, adding that such venues were the country’s first literary and cultural forums, where people could gather to discuss literary and intellectual issues.
With his models and exhibition, Al-Hebshi said he wants to depict and preserve this history of day-to-day life and culture in Makkah and Jeddah in days gone by. In addition to the cafe, his models include typical houses and traditional shops that served fava beans, barbecued meat, kebabs and mabshoor, a traditional Arab dish of bread in a meat or vegetable broth.
In particular, he said he wants to immortalize the lives of the intellectuals and writers of the era by documenting their daily lives, the ways in which people interacted with them and how neighborhoods such as Misfalah developed as important cultural centers.
So far he has spent three years building his models of cafes, shops, houses and public squares. He has completed four and is working on a fifth. The task requires hard work and patience, he said. For example, it requires great effort to accurately recreate in miniature the rawasheen, the elaborately patterned wooden window frames found in old buildings in Makkah and Jeddah that maximize natural light and air flow. Great accuracy is required throughout the model making process when it comes to the sizes, dimensions and scale.
“One meter in real life is 10 centimeters in the models,” Al-Hebshi said, which represents a scale of one-to-10. “This measure seeks to maintain, as much as possible, the space’s real dimensions.”
The contents of rooms must also be in scale with the building and each other, he explained: “A bottle of Coca-Cola cannot be bigger than a watermelon and so on.” These are all important details in his models, he added, which ensure they are accurate and consistent.
Given the incredible detail and quality of the models, you would be forgiven for thinking Al-Hebshi is a trained carpenter; in fact he is an enthusiastic amateur with a true passion for the craft. Such is his dedication that even hand injuries — and the need for surgery after damaging a finger with a drill — have not kept him from his work for long.

HIGHLIGHT

Abdul Aziz Taher Al-Hebshi says he was inspired by Jeddah’s Old Town and its magnificent Hijazi buildings with rawasheen, beautifully crafted doors, ornate engravings and delicate details, along with the beauty of its landscape and old streets.

He said his model making began after he found some tools that had been abandoned in a carpentry shop, and for materials he used wood and discarded kaftans he found in stores he shopped at. Wood cutting requires great skill, he added, and while he makes most parts of his models, he said he imports some items from abroad to ensure the highest levels of accuracy. For example he buys miniature signs advertising popular international brands such as Pepsi, Miranda and 7-Up, which are difficult to recreate through woodworking.
Al-Hebshi was director of the Agricultural Bank in Jeddah when he was forced to retire in 2006 as a result of a back injury, and he found himself wondering what he could do with his time. A few years earlier he had developed an interest in woodworking but the demands of his job left him with little time to pursue it. A friend who was aware of this suggested he do something with the wood from a large felled neem tree that had been dumped in Jeddah.
“That tree turned out to be the start of me professionally building models,” he said. He added that he was inspired by Jeddah’s Old Town and its magnificent Hijazi buildings with rawasheen, beautifully crafted doors, ornate engravings and delicate details, along with the beauty of its landscape and old streets. The Saudi leadership has put a special focus on the area to showcase its history and splendor and Al-Hebshi said that this has helped him research his detailed designs.
He added that he welcomes all those who wish to visit his house, in Al-Rawdah neighborhood 3, to see his models. He plans to build more to add to his incredible picture of past life in the Kingdom, and the people who helped the country become the nation it is.


Iraq gets back looted ancient artifacts from US, others

Iraq gets back looted ancient artifacts from US, others
Updated 03 August 2021

Iraq gets back looted ancient artifacts from US, others

Iraq gets back looted ancient artifacts from US, others
  • The majority of the artifacts date back 4,000 years to ancient Mesopotamia and were recovered from the US in a recent trip by PM Mustafa Al-Kadhimi
  • Iraq’s antiquities have been looted throughout decades of war and instability since the 2003 US-led invasion that toppled Saddam Hussein

BAGHDAD: Over 17,000 looted ancient artifacts recovered from the United States and other countries were handed over to Iraq’s Culture Ministry on Tuesday, a restitution described by the government as the largest in the country’s history.
The majority of the artifacts date back 4,000 years to ancient Mesopotamia and were recovered from the US in a recent trip by Prime Minister Mustafa Al-Kadhimi. Other pieces were also returned from Japan, Netherlands and Italy, Foreign Minister Fuad Hussein said in a joint press conference with Culture Minister Hasan Nadhim.
Nadhim said the recovery was “the largest in the history of Iraq” and the product of months of effort between the government and Iraq’s Embassy in Washington.
“There’s still a lot of work ahead in this matter. There are still thousands of Iraqi artifacts smuggled outside the country,” he said. “The United Nations resolutions are supporting us in the international community and the laws of other countries in which these artifacts are smuggled to are on our side.”
“The smugglers are being trapped day after day by these laws and forced to hand over these artifacts,” he added.
The artifacts were handed over to the Culture Ministry in large wooden crates. A few were displayed but the ministry said the most significant pieces will be examined and later displayed to the public in Iraq’s National Museum.
Iraq’s antiquities have been looted throughout decades of war and instability since the 2003 US-led invasion that toppled Saddam Hussein. Iraq’s government has been slowly recovering the plundered antiquities since. However, archaeological sites across the country continue to be neglected owing to lack of funds.
At least five shipments of antiquities and documents have been returned to Iraq’s museum since 2016, according to the Foreign Ministry.


Mideast, North Africa region to get 50 Best Restaurants list in 2022

Mideast, North Africa region to get 50 Best Restaurants list in 2022
50 Best Restaurants lauds Trèsind as one of the best dining establishments in Dubai. Courtesy
Updated 03 August 2021

Mideast, North Africa region to get 50 Best Restaurants list in 2022

Mideast, North Africa region to get 50 Best Restaurants list in 2022

DUBAI: In February 2022, some of the most lauded restaurateurs, fine chefs and food lovers will congregate in the UAE for the reveal of the 50 top restaurants in the region.  

It’s been announced that The World's 50 Best Restaurants, owned and run by William Reed Business Media and established in 2002, is launching a new regional restaurants list and awards program that will be hosted in Abu Dhabi early next year.

It will be the first time that a Middle Eastern country will play host to the prestigious event, which is informally known as the Oscars of fine dining.

“We are delighted that Abu Dhabi will be playing host to the awards ceremony, as the UAE capital has been establishing itself as a culinary force over recent years,” William Drew, Director of Content for 50 Best, said in a released statement.

Middle East & North Africa’s 50 Best Restaurants is the latest regional restaurants list and awards program since 2013, when both Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants and Latin America’s 50 Best Restaurants were established. 

The list, which was born out of the magazine pages of Britain’s “Restaurant” is now widely regarded as the most highly influential ranking of its kind.

The inaugural Middle East & North Africa’s 50 Best Restaurants list will be revealed in a live countdown, along with a series of special awards, culminating in the announcement of The Best Restaurant in the Middle East & North Africa 2022. 

“The diversity of cuisines and restaurants across this wide region will ensure this new list is a vital addition to the international gastronomic landscape,” added Drew.

The ranking will be determined by 250 voters, made up of anonymous restaurant experts from 19 countries across the region, based on their best restaurant experiences. Dining establishments cannot apply to be on the list.

Meanwhile, a program of events, including a forum, chef masterclasses and dining events, will be hosted in the UAE capital in partnership with the Department of Culture and Tourism – Abu Dhabi from Feb. 4-11, as part of the Abu Dhabi Culinary Calendar.

Some events will be open to the public on a ticketed basis, with details to be revealed later.

The gala awards ceremony is set to take place on Feb. 7.