Katy Perry turns to Lebanon’s designer-to-the-stars Elie Saab

Katy Perry wore a gown by Lebanese designer Elie Saab. (AFP)
Updated 10 February 2019

Katy Perry turns to Lebanon’s designer-to-the-stars Elie Saab

DUBAI: US singer Katy Perry showed off a whimsical floral gown by Lebanese couturier Elie Saab over the weekend at a charity awards gala honoring country singer Dolly Parton in Los Angeles.
Perry walked the red carpet in a caped gown from Elie Saab’s ready-to-wear Spring/Summer 2019 collection.
Parton became the first country singer to receive the MusiCares Person of the Year award at the event on Friday, taking to the stage with jokes about hillbillies.
Comedy played a large role in a night of all-star musical performances in Los Angeles to honor Parton for her music and philanthropy, hosted by country group Little Big Town.
Eight-time Grammy winner Parton, the singer and songwriter behind the hits ‘9 to 5,’ ‘Jolene’ and ‘I Will Always Love You,’ got the biggest laughs at the 29th annual gala for MusiCares, which helps members of the music industry in need.
Garth Brooks, Brandi Carlile, Miley Cyrus, Shawn Mendes, Kacey Musgraves, Willie Nelson, Katy Perry, Pink, Chris Stapleton and Don Henley were among those honoring the 73-year-old singer-songwriter two days before the Grammy Awards, the Associated Press reported.
‘I loved yee-hawing with my country (queen) @spaceykacey for (the) queen @dollyparton. I would never brave Friday night traffic in LA for anyone else,’ Katy Perry posted on Instagram, referring to her performance with country singer Kacey Musgraves.




(AFP)


Surprising Parton with her award and earning a standing ovation were Emmylou Harris and Linda Ronstadt, who teamed with Parton for two successful ‘Trio’ albums. It was a rare public appearance for Ronstadt, who can’t sing anymore because of Parkinson’s disease, which Parton mentioned.
As Parton rushed to embrace Harris and Ronstadt, her award crashed to the floor. It appeared to survive intact.
Parton, whose career began with appearances at the age of 10 on radio stations in her native Tennessee, appeared to touch on some of the concerns of the #MeToo movement and sexual misconduct in entertainment and other industries, when she described entering the music business when it was a ‘man’s world.’
‘Buddy, I had a ball,’ she said to more laughs. ‘Because I have actually worked with so many wonderful men and I’ve never met a man that I didn’t like and I’ve never met a man whose a** I couldn’t kick if he didn’t treat me with the right respect.’
Friday’s gala raised $6.7 million for MusiCares, Recording Academy President and CEO Neil Portnow told the audience.
Parton was also honored on Sunday with another tribute at the Grammy Awards.


UAE brand’s fresh approach to skincare looking good for future

Having lived in Dubai for more than seven years, Kathryn Jones learned a lot about the Middle Eastern market and the needs of people who live within the region. (Shutterstock)
Updated 25 May 2020

UAE brand’s fresh approach to skincare looking good for future

DUBAI: Skincare products can quite often sit on shelfs or in delivery vehicles for weeks and months, stored in unsuitable conditions.

And despite brands promoting them as organic and natural, some customers might question the effectiveness of products left lying around for long periods after being produced.

However, Kathryn Jones, founder of the UAE-based brand Kathryn Jones Hand Blended Serums, or KJ Serums for short, told Arab News how her company created fresh products every month for customers.

Jones, who is originally from Wales, in the UK, launched KJ Serums in 2017 and started her brand “out of necessity.” (Supplied)

“The concept of a freshly-made skincare serum is something quite different and our customers have really embraced it. They appreciate it’s a fresh product that must be used up within a month when it’s at its most active and effective and repurchased – almost like a food stuff,” she said.

Jones, who is originally from Wales, in the UK, launched KJ Serums in 2017 and started her brand “out of necessity.”

She added: “I simply could not afford the prices of some of the top skincare brands but still wanted excellent results.”

With her background in the biopharmaceuticals industry, she started experimenting and developing her own formulas. “The core proposition is ‘hand blended’ because that’s how it all started, by hand blending and perfecting the serum formulas myself here in the UAE,” she said.

Having lived in Dubai for more than seven years, the entrepreneur learned a lot about the Middle Eastern market and the needs of people who live within the region.

“Our climate here is extreme often for eight months or more of the year, especially in the Gulf region. A lot our customers will ask for a product that reduces oiliness and sheen on the skin and are reluctant to purchase products that contain a lot of oils, or are very heavily moisturizing,” Jones added.

The businesswoman believes the Middle East market is “wonderfully diverse” with different attitudes and expectations toward skincare products.

“Of course, this is a challenge to develop effective products which can address many different skin types and issues, but the market is truly receptive to new concepts,” she said.

Jones pointed out that with the current lockdown situation due to the ongoing spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), people had more time to care for their skin.

“The coronavirus pandemic has obviously confined us to our homes, and, given the steady increase in the number of enquiries we are receiving, it suggests consumers currently have more time to consider their online skincare purchases and perhaps have more time to invest in an effective routine,” she said.

On whether the COVID-19 outbreak would change the future of the skincare industry, Jones added: “I think that many consumers, either through necessity or out of a desire to support local brands might have chosen to source their products from different manufacturers and therefore brand loyalties may have been affected to a certain extent.”