The Six: Dubai Modest Fashion Week

Modest fashion show. (Shutterstock)
Updated 27 February 2019

The Six: Dubai Modest Fashion Week

DUBAI: Founded by entrepreneurs Franka Soeria and Ozlem Sahin, the event will run from March 7-9 and will feature fashion labels from around the world.  

Adrianna Yariqa

Adrianna Yariqa is a Singaporean modest fashion brand that offers woman and men stylish and trendy looks with a modest twist.  

Emma Melissa Apparel

A Singaporean label that focuses on creating designs with linen, most of the looks are two-piece matching sets that come in various different colors.

Kazeca Studio

Kazeca Studio is a modest fashion shop that curates looks from Australian designers and labels. It is a one-stop-shop for modest wear with a range of styles on offer.

Mariyan Suleymanova

Mariyan Suleymanova focuses on creating beautiful one-piece dresses for any occasion. From casual outings to more formal occasions, the brand offers a variety of styles and colors.

Niswa Fashion

A modern modest fashion brand that offers women a variety of looks and pieces to work with to curate a chic overall look. They offer garments for any occasion and have a variety of collections.  

Zeina Ali

Zeina Ali is a brand inspired by art, royalty, nature and glamour, according to their website. They seek to create creative pieces with a modest twist.

 


Spectacular sarees steal limelight at LFW’s India Day showing

India Day at London Fashion Week. (Supplied)
Updated 19 February 2020

Spectacular sarees steal limelight at LFW’s India Day showing

LONDON: Indian fashion was celebrated in high style at London Fashion Week’s Fashion Scout.

A showcase of young Indian designers was followed by a remarkable representation of the country’s rich culture through 17 magnificent sarees selected by female staff at the Indian High Commission in London.

The evening event was led by the High Commissioner of India to the UK Ruchi Ghanashyam, and included a short video message from the Indian Minister of Textiles Smriti Irani.

The sarees selected for the showing represented tradition covering the whole of India. (Supplied)

The Indian designers, who showcased contemporary trends, included Shabnam Harjai, Nabila Saiyedarif Attas, Chaitra Basavaraj Kalyanshettar, Tanishaa Parakh, Sourav Marndi, Sandya Miriyala, Suchitra Rani Sahoo, Darshna Gothi, Ayushi Jain and Pearl Lobo.

Their pieces were fresh and original but what followed opened a window on centuries of breathtaking artisanship and the sheer scale and diversity of Indian traditional design.

The sarees selected for the showing, titled “Six Yards of Elegance,” represented tradition covering the whole of India – from Jammu and Kashmir to Varanisi, in Uttar Pradesh. 

A showcase of young Indian designers was followed by a remarkable representation of the country’s rich culture through 17 magnificent sarees. (Supplied)

The showcase was compered by Maithreyi Seetharaman, who heads Fortune Magazine’s Most Powerful Women International.

In her opening remarks she said: “It’s my pleasure to host this rather special showcase of discovery – not led by a designer – but by the wonderful and talented women of the High Commission of India, showcasing India and its backbone in six yards.

“Since the time of the silk route, the soul of Indian women has found its way to every closet and runway across the globe – from the high street to couture – reflected in the designs, embroidery and materials that are now core to the world of fashion.

“What we wear each day to work, weddings and funerals is perhaps the purest form of the discovery of India, representing who we are and the core of our culture,” added Seetharaman.

The showcase was compered by Maithreyi Seetharaman, who heads Fortune Magazine’s Most Powerful Women International. (Supplied)

Picking out any one saree from those on display was almost impossible, as all had their own unique hallmarks, but of outstanding beauty was the Kerela kasavu saree.

Seetharaman said: “Vibrant colors define the Indian woman but the muted elegance of women in God’s own country, Kerela, can be identified clearly by their use of the traditional kasavu saree. Restrained elegance is on display with its traditional cream color and rich gold border.

“Kasavu specifically only refers to the intricate gold brocade border; it is widely used during religious ceremonies and especially during the Hindu new year when purity and spirituality is reborn, and the journey of the discovery of India and Indians begins afresh.”

The pieces opened a window on centuries of breathtaking artisanship and the sheer scale and diversity of Indian traditional design. (Supplied)

Also breathtaking was the banarasi silk saree. “We stay westward in the ancient city of Varanasi with the silk saree considered the pinnacle of hand-weaving. It is for an Indian woman what a Birkin bag is to fashionistas and part of every north Indian bride’s trousseau,” added Seetharaman.

“Originally crafted only for royalty, each banarasi sari takes a year to make in fine silk with embroidery in real gold and silver and motifs in brocade silk. Banaras brocades and sarees got the geographical indication (GI) rights in 2009, securing protection for these artisanal works.”