Arab News Saudi National Day video scoops top WAN-IFRA prize

Updated 07 March 2019

Arab News Saudi National Day video scoops top WAN-IFRA prize

  • The video was commissioned to mark the start of Arab News' coverage of Vision 2030
  • Arab News has one several awards for its design

DUBAI: A video produced for Saudi National Day by Arab News has scooped the top prize in an international media award ceremony held in Dubai on Wednesday.

The video was commissioned to launch the newspaper's 'Road to 2030' section which encompasses a series of reports focusing on tracking the progress and reforms happening in the kingdom, such as allowing women to drive and reopening cinemas.

The online video category at the WAN-IFRA Middle East Awards is the latest award given to the Saudi Arabian English language daily since its relaunch in April 2018, after picking up silver in the “redesigned product category” at the WAN-IFRA Print Innovation Awards, held in Berlin on Oct. 9.

Arab News scooped another international design award last month, this time recogniz in the international design awards run by “HOW” magazine for its iconic Women Drivers cover of a special souvenir edition on June 24 of last year.

Simon Khalil, global creative director at Arab News, said: “Saudi Arabia is such an exciting country full of rich history and amazing people.

“The video reflects that history and focusses on the incredibly bright future Saudi Arabia has thanks to the Road to 2030 initiative, these really are exciting times for the Kingdom and for any designers and content creators it is an absolute joy to work with such exciting and positive stories.

“Since our redesign and relaunch last April we have done amazing things and always look for innovative and exiting ways to engage with our readers. Long may that continue,” he added.

The video was produced to highlight Saudi Arabia’s past, present and future.

WAN-IFRA, a global association of newspapers and news publishers, recognizes publishers that have adopted digital media and mobile strategies as part of their total product offering to “meet the changes in how people consume news and information.”


Facebook’s Zuckerberg promises a review of content policies after backlash

Updated 06 June 2020

Facebook’s Zuckerberg promises a review of content policies after backlash

  • Trump's message contained the phrase "when the looting starts, the shooting starts"

WASHINGTON: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on Friday said he would consider changes to the policy that led the company to leave up controversial posts by President Donald Trump during recent demonstrations protesting the death of an unarmed black man while in police custody, a partial concession to critics.
Zuckerberg did not promise specific policy changes in a Facebook post, days after staff members walked off the job, some claiming he kept finding new excuses not to challenge Trump.
"I know many of you think we should have labeled the President's posts in some way last week," Zuckerberg wrote, referring to his decision not to remove Trump's message containing the phrase "when the looting starts, the shooting starts."
"We're going to review our policies allowing discussion and threats of state use of force to see if there are any amendments we should adopt," he wrote. "We're going to review potential options for handling violating or partially-violating content aside from the binary leave-it-up or take-it-down decisions."
Zuckerberg said Facebook would be more transparent about its decision-making on whether to take down posts, review policies on posts that could cause voter suppression and would look to build software to advance racial justice, led by important lieutenants.
At a staff meeting earlier this week, employees questioned Zuckerberg's stance on Trump's post.
Zuckerberg, who holds a controlling stake in Facebook, has maintained that while he found Trump's comments "deeply offensive," they did not violate company policy against incitements to violence.
Facebook's policy is either to take down a post or leave it up, without any other options. Now, Zuckerberg said, other possibilities would be considered.
However, he added, "I worry that this approach has a risk of leading us to editorialize on content we don't like even if it doesn't violate our policies."