Murdoch’s News Corp. calls for Google breakup

News organizations accuse the tech giants of gaining huge commercial benefit from expensive to create content. (Shutterstock)
Updated 12 March 2019

Murdoch’s News Corp. calls for Google breakup

  • News Corp’s local subsidiary complained that “Google enjoys overwhelming market power in both online search and ad tech services”
  • News organizations accuse the tech giants of gaining huge commercial benefit from expensive to create content

SYDNEY: Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. has called for Google to be broken up in Australia, the latest salvo in a battle between the corporate media giants.
In a petition to Australian regulators, News Corp’s local subsidiary complained that “Google enjoys overwhelming market power in both online search and ad tech services.”
Going a step further, the company accused Google of “abusing its dominant position to the detriment of consumers, advertisers and publishers.”
Earlier this week US presidential hopeful — and former federal consumer watchdog — Elizabeth Warren became the latest in a line of commentators to argue that firms such as Amazon, Google and Facebook hold ” too much power” in society.
News Corp. echoed her argument that Google’s businesses should be split, or failing that, search and advertising businesses should be firewalled off from each other.
“While News Corp. Australia recognizes that divestment is a very serious step ... divestment is necessary in the case of Google, due to the unparalleled power that it currently exerts over news publishers and advertisers alike.”
Australian watchdogs are seen as unlikely to recommend that Google be split, but the petition represents an intensification of the worldwide fight between Australian-born Murdoch and Google and Facebook.
News organizations accuse the tech giants of gaining huge commercial benefit from expensive to create content, while paying nothing and syphoning off advertising.
The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission is one of several regulators across the world investigating the effect that digital platforms have on competition in the media, advertising and advertising services markets.
News organizations in Australia have struggled in recent years with falling revenue and shrinking staff, as giants like Google and Facebook dominate the digital economy.
The downturn has prompted a string of mergers that have left the market with only three or four major media companies.
Local newspapers, once the lifeblood of communities across this vast country, run on a skeletal staff or have been forced to close.
Among them Murdoch’s News Corp. is a dominant player, owning a slew of newspapers, television channels and the country’s only major cable television network.
Murdoch’s vast political influence has frequently come underfire from former prime ministers on both sides of Australian politics and is widely seen as pushing the tone of public debate to the right.
News Corp. Australia is a subsidiary of News Corp, which owns 21st Century Fox, the Wall Street Journal, Fox News, and a raft of papers and TV platforms in Britain.


Arab News Japanese edition to launch in October

Updated 16 September 2019

Arab News Japanese edition to launch in October

  • Digital news service to be available in English and Japanese
  • Launch to coincide with Emperor enthronement ceremony

TOKYO: Arab News, the Middle East’s leading English language daily, is to launch a Japanese-language online edition as part of its ongoing global expansion.

The international edition will be the second under the Arab News brand, following the highly successful launch of the Pakistani edition. 

As a symbol of the cordial business, trading and cultural relations between the Kingdom and Japan, arabnews.jp will commence coverage to coincide with the enthronement of Emperor Naruhito next month. It will be a 24-hour rolling news website comprising original material generated in Tokyo and translations of Arab News’ award-winning English content.

Faisal J. Abbas, Arab News editor-in-chief, announced the project at the G1 Global conference in Tokyo on Monday, September 16.

The Japanese edition will be the second under the Arab News brand.

He said: ““As part of our more digital, more global direction; we are delighted to announce the launch of Arab News Japan. The news site will be available in both English and Japanese, with a content mix that blends original reporting from both the Middle East and Japan as well as a translated feed of some of our most important news and views. 

“We are also honored to coincide our launch with our coverage of the enthronement ceremony of Emperor Naruhito. We hope that our new service arabnews.jp helps bring a better mutual understanding of both our rich cultures and become a trusted communication channel where our friends in japan can rely on us for credible information and insightful analysis,” he added.

Japan is one of Saudi Arabia’s most important economic partners. A major part of Japan’s energy imports come from Saudi Arabia. The Kingdom imports manufactured goods and electronic equipment from Japan, and is a significant destination for Japanese financial investment.

Saudi Arabia officials are working with their Japanese counterparts on the formal handover for the G20 leaders’ summit, which will take place in the Kingdom next year, following the highly success event held in Osaka, Japan, in June.

At that event, Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman told Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe that Japan was a country dear to the hearts of all Saudis. “We will work together to prepare for the G20 summit 2020 in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia,” the Crown Prince said.

The prime minister praised the Kingdom’s progress in accordance with the Vision 2030 strategy and pointed to the keenness of the government of Japan and its readiness through public and private sectors to make further efforts and cooperation with the Kingdom.

Arab News is part of the regional publishing group Saudi Research and Marketing Group (SRMG). It has been the English newspaper of record for Saudi Arabia and the region for over 40 years.