Indonesia to speed up release of Lion Air crash report

The cause of the Indonesian crash is still being investigated. (File/AFP)
Updated 15 March 2019

Indonesia to speed up release of Lion Air crash report

  • The decisions comes days after an Ethiopian Airlines flight with the same aircraft crashed
  • Indonesia plans to send a flight inspector and an official from KNKT to Ethiopia to help with the probe

JAKARTA: Indonesia will hasten the release of its report on the October crash of Lion Air Boeing 737, the head of the nation’s transport safety committee said on Friday.
The crash, which killed all 189 people on board, was the first worldwide of Boeing Co’s new 737 MAX jet. A second deadly incident occurred on Sunday with the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines MAX jet that killed all 157 people on board.
Soerjanto, the head of safety agency KNKT, told Reuters the investigation into the Lion Air crash would be speeded up and the report will be released in July-August, earlier than its original timeline of August-September.
The cause of the Indonesian crash is still being investigated. A preliminary report by KNKT in November, before the retrieval of the cockpit voice recorder, focused on maintenance and training and the response of a Boeing anti-stall system to a recently replaced sensor, but gave no reason for the crash.
Indonesia plans to send a flight inspector and an official from KNKT to Ethiopia to help with the probe into Sunday’s crash, pending approval from Ethiopian authorities, Soerjanto said.
“Yesterday morning, we communicated with Boeing, the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the National Transportation Safety Board in Ethiopia, but we have yet to exchange information,” Soerjanto said, adding that they had requested the results of the investigation into the plane’s black boxes.
“As there is no certainty from Boeing and FAA, we will continue to advocate for the Boeing Max 8 planes to stay grounded.”
USlawmakers said on Thursday that Boeing Co’s 737 MAX 8 and 9 planes will be grounded for weeks if not longer until a software upgrade can be tested and installed, as officials in France prepared to begin analyzing the black boxes from a jet that crashed in Ethiopia.


600,000 Rohingya still in Myanmar at ‘serious risk of genocide’: UN

Updated 22 min 19 sec ago

600,000 Rohingya still in Myanmar at ‘serious risk of genocide’: UN

  • Some 740,000 Rohingya fled burning villages, bringing accounts of murder, rape and torture from Myanmar
  • UN team says the 600,000 Rohingya still inside Myanmar’s Rakhine state

YANGON: Rohingya Muslims remaining in Myanmar still face a “serious risk of genocide,” UN investigators said Monday, warning the repatriation of a million already driven from the country by the army remains “impossible.”
The fact-finding mission to Myanmar, set up by the Human Rights Council, last year branded the army operations in 2017 as “genocide” and called for the prosecution of top generals, including army chief Min Aung Hlaing.
Some 740,000 Rohingya fled burning villages, bringing accounts of murder, rape and torture over the border to sprawling refugee camps in Bangladesh, where survivors of previous waves of persecution already languish.
But in a damning report, the UN team said the 600,000 Rohingya still inside Myanmar’s Rakhine state remain in deteriorating and “deplorable” conditions.
“Myanmar continues to harbor genocidal intent and the Rohingya remain under serious risk of genocide,” the investigators said in their final report on Myanmar, due to be presented Tuesday in Geneva.
The country is “denying wrongdoing, destroying evidence, refusing to conduct effective investigations and clearing, razing, confiscating and building on land from which it displaced Rohingya,” it said.
Myanmar military spokesman Zaw Min Tun rejected the team’s findings, calling them “one-sided.”
“Instead of making biased accusations, they should go onto the ground to see the reality,” Zaw Min Tun said.