Nicole Scherzinger proves she’s just like every other tourist with this iconic Dubai snap

Nicole Scherzinger visited Dubai after performing in the Special Olympics World Games in Abu Dhabi. (AFP/File)
Updated 25 March 2019

Nicole Scherzinger proves she’s just like every other tourist with this iconic Dubai snap

  • The singer performed for the Abu Dhabi Special Olympics, where more than 7,500 athletes took part
  • Scherzinger's aunt has Down Syndrome

DUBAI: Dubai is one of the region’s most popular tourist hubs and there’s one photograph that eager visitors scramble to snap when they touch down in the city of gold — a shot of them standing in front of the iconic Burj Khalifa.

Visitor from the furthest reaches of the globe can always be seen striking a pose — or 20 — in front of the tallest building in the world before posting the coveted snap online.

Singer Nicole Scherzinger joined the legions of travelers who have posted similar shots on their social media feeds and took to Instagram this week with a collection of snaps of herself standing in front of a glittering Burj Khalifa at night.

The performer wore a black-and-white striped crop top with a matching tiered maxi skirt, complete with frilled layers.

She visited Dubai after performing in the Special Olympics World Games in Abu Dhabi’s closing concert.  

The games saw more than 7,500 athletes from 190 nations compete in 24 officially sanctioned Olympic-style sports geared toward athletes with intellectual disabilities.

“Tonight, I got to go out into the stadium and hang amongst some of the amazing athletes that competed at the @worldgamesad this week. Over 7000 phenomenal humans with intellectual disabilities (or as I call them, super abilities)… came together in Abu Dhabi to battle it out through sports. My love and admiration of this organization is almost selfish — the joy and inspiration spending time with them brings me restores my faith in humanity time and time again. Athletes, you are of such determination, power, SUPERPOWERS, strength, grace, humility and pure LOVE! Congratulations to all of the incredible talent that competed and celebrated with us tonight,” the star posted on Instagram after her show.

According to the organizers, singer and songwriter Scherzinger has a personal connection with the Special Olympics due to her close relationship with her aunt, who has Down syndrome.

“She is such a positive influence and inspiration for me,” Scherzinger told the UK’s Metro newspaper in 2013. “People get caught up in everyday little problems and in their own vanity and Keziah is always happy and there to give you love and a hug no matter what. She’s a big walking ball of love – she inspires me to be happy, help others and be more grateful.”


South Asian marriage websites under fire for color bias

Updated 12 July 2020

South Asian marriage websites under fire for color bias

DHAHRAN: An online backlash has forced the matrimonial website Shaadi.com to take down an ‘skin color’ filter which asked users to specify their skin color using descriptors such as fair, wheatish or dark. The filter on the popular site, which caters to the South Asian diaspora, was one of the parameters for matching prospective partners.

Meghan Nagpal, a Toronto-based graduate student, logged on to the website and was appalled to see the skin-color filter. “Why should I support such archaic view [in 2020]?” she told Arab News.

Nagpal cited further examples of implicit biases against skin color in the diaspora communities – women who are dark-skinned are never acknowledged as “beautiful” or how light-skinned South Asian women who are mistaken as Caucasian consider it a compliment.

“Such biases stem from a history of colonization and the mentality that ‘white is superior’,” she said.

When Nagpal emailed the website’s customer service team, she received the response that “this is what most parents require.” She shared her experience on a Facebook group, attracting the attention of Florida-based Roshni Patel and Dallas-based Hetal Lakhani. The former took to online activism by tweeting the company and the latter started an online petition.

Overnight, the petition garnered more 1,500 signatures and the site eventually removed the filter.

“Now is the time to re-evaluate what we consider beautiful. Colorism has significant consequences in our community, especially for women. People with darker skin experience greater prejudice, violence, bullying and social sanctions,” the petition reads. “The idea that fairer skin is ‘good’ and darker skin is ‘bad’ is completely irrational. Not only is it untrue, but it is an entirely socially constructed perception based in neo-colonialism and casteism, which has no place in the 21st century.”

Overnight, the petition garnered more 1,500 signatures and the site eventually removed the filter.

“When a user highlighted this, we were thankful and had the remnants removed immediately. We do not discriminate based on skin color and our member base is as diverse and pluralistic as the world,” a spokesperson said.

“If one company starts a movement like this, it can change minds and perceptions. This is a step in the right direction,” said Nagpal. Soon after, Shaadi.com’s competitor Jeevansathi.com also took down the skin filter from its website.

Colorism and bias in matrimony is only one issue; prejudices are deeply ingrained and widespread across society. Dr. Sarah Rasmi, a Dubai-based psychologist, highlights research and observations on how light skin is an advantage in society.

The website took down the skin filter following backlash.

“Dark skin tends to have lower socio-economic status and, in the US justice system, has been found to get harsher and more punitive sentences.

“These biases for fair as opposed to dark skin comes from colonial prejudices and the idea that historically, light skin has been associated with privilege, power and superiority,” she said.

However, in the wake of #BlackLivesMatter protests, change is underway.

Last month, Johnson & Johnson announced that it will be discontinuing its skin whitening creams in Asian and Middle Eastern markets, and earlier this month Hindustan Unilever Limited (Unilever’s Indian subsidiary) announced that it will remove the words ‘fair, white and light’ from its products and marketing. To promote an inclusive standard of beauty, it has also renamed its flagship Fair & Lovely product line to Glow & Lovely.

“Brands have to move away from these standards of beauty and be more inclusive so that people – regardless of their color, size, shape or gender – can find a role model that looks like them in the mass media,” said Dr. Rasmi.