Prince Turki: Purveyors of terror not from one religion

Prince Turki: Purveyors of terror not from one religion
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Saudi Arabia’s former diplomat Prince Turki Al-Faisal reading Arab News. (AN photo by Basheer Saleh)
Prince Turki: Purveyors of terror not from one religion
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Mourners laying flowers in memory of the victims of the recent mosque attacks in Christchurch, New Zealand. Prince Turki described the attacks as a “horrific crime.” (AFP)
Updated 09 April 2019

Prince Turki: Purveyors of terror not from one religion

Prince Turki: Purveyors of terror not from one religion
  • Saudi Arabia’s former diplomat commends Arab News for ‘Preachers of Hate’ project
  • The campaign, in print and online, analyzes the words and deeds of extremist preachers and clerics from all religions and nationalities, places them in context, and explains how they fuel terrorism

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s former ambassador to the US and UK, Prince Turki Al-Faisal, has praised the weekly “Preachers of Hate” project that Arab News launched online and in print on Sunday.

“I think this is something that Arab News has stood for since its establishment more than 40 years ago,” he told the newspaper with regard to the project, which highlights extremists from various religions who incite hatred and spread terror worldwide.

“So I congratulate us, as readers of this service that Arab News is providing us. 

“Exposing the purveyors of hate, whoever they may be, is an essential part of combatting terrorism and hate speech. So good luck.”

 

 

 

Prince Turki said the recent terrorist attacks against peaceful worshippers at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, were a “horrific crime” perpetrated by a hateful purveyor of bias and prejudice.

He added that the murderer is a “perfect example of what we’re combatting in the Kingdom. 

“The efforts of the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Salman, and his Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman, emphasize the need to stand up to these hateful criminals who distort the teachings of religion. 

“Unfortunately, these purveyors of mayhem, destruction and terrorism come from all religious and philosophical backgrounds.”

When asked by Arab News whether Daesh was truly defeated, Prince Turki said: “I don’t know.” 

He added that Saudi Arabia succeeded in combatting Al-Qaeda, yet from that group came Daesh, which he referred to as “fahish,” which means obscene in Arabic.

“Now we see claims of the eradication of fahish. What will follow we will have to wait and see,” he said.

“But if you look at some geographical areas — from the Philippines through to Afghanistan, Indonesia, all the way to North Africa and some of the Sahel countries in Africa — there are still those who are carrying the flag of fahish. 

“So maybe in Syria and Iraq there has been success in removing fahish from the scene, but it exists in other places.” 

 

 


Saudi Arabia’s first COVID-19 vaccine set for clinical trials

Saudi Arabia’s first COVID-19 vaccine set for clinical trials
Updated 27 min 7 sec ago

Saudi Arabia’s first COVID-19 vaccine set for clinical trials

Saudi Arabia’s first COVID-19 vaccine set for clinical trials
  • It will go through rigorous testing and several trial stages before it is approved for use by the Saudi Food and Drug Authority

RIYADH: Preclinical studies on the first Saudi vaccine against COVID-19 have been completed.

Professor of epidemiology Dr. Iman Almansour, who heads the team of researchers working on the vaccine at the Institute for Research and Medical Consultations (IRMC), affiliated with Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University (IAU), confirmed to Arab News on Friday that the studies were complete, and said clinical trials would begin as soon as “the proper approvals” had been given.

She did not specify when that is expected to happen.

The Ministry of Education is financing the team’s project. The team’s research paper has been published in the peer-reviewed journal Pharmaceuticals.

According to the published paper, the vaccine has so far proven effective, when used on animals, in eliciting antibodies that will target the virus. “The vaccine is given to the body to build protein inside cells, which stimulate the body to produce immunity specific to the S antigen,” Dr. Almansour explained.

Dr. Turki Almugaiteeb, director of Healthcare and Life Sciences at RPD Innovations, which runs the National Vaccine and Biomanufacturing Center, told Arab News: “There is a great focus on the results of medical research because of the pandemic. Research can play a great role in developing a vaccine that can be adopted and further developed in the future. We can say that the Kingdom has a strong infrastructure, which can help produce and manufacture a national vaccine.”

Both Almugaiteeb and Almansour stressed that the experimental vaccine will need to go through rigorous testing and several trial stages before it is approved for use by the Saudi Food and Drug Authority.

Prof. Nasser Al-Aqeeli, the deputy minister of education for research and innovation, said the ministry supported programs at the Kingdom’s universities with more than SR500 million ($133.3 million) in 2020.