Saudi Arabia’s largest eastern archaeological site explored

Dr. Jerome Romer, at a lecture organized by the Antiquities and Museums Department of the SCTH, claimed that the dig was the biggest yet to be launched in Saudi Arabia, and that the site was the largest yet discovered in the east of the Kingdom. (SPA)
Updated 28 March 2019

Saudi Arabia’s largest eastern archaeological site explored

  • Thaj, 90 km west of the city of Jubail and under observation since a 2016 agreement between the SCTH and the French National Center for Scientific Research

RIYADH: The head of the Saudi-French archaeological mission working at the site of Thaj in the Eastern Province has given an update on the progress of the excavation.

Dr. Jerome Romer, at a lecture organized by the Antiquities and Museums Department of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH), claimed that the dig was the biggest yet to be lunched in Saudi Arabia, and that the site was the largest to be unearthed in the east of the Kingdom.

Thaj, 90 km west of the city of Jubail and under observation since a 2016 agreement between the SCTH and the French National Center for Scientific Research, would once have been a major urban center at the beginning of the Common Era, over 2,000 years ago.

Excavations in the region, Romer added, represented an exciting new chapter in the history of the Arabian Peninsula, and he pointed out that the exploration of the site revealed it was perhaps the biggest pre-Islamic Arab settlement on the East Coast.

“In ancient times, just like today, the Arabian Peninsula was a commercial and cultural hub, at the crossroads of the great civilizations of that time in the Levant, Mesopotamia and India. Its cities hosted rich trade convoys and became strong commerce-based kingdoms,” he said.

The Saudi-French mission has carried out multiple excavations and surveys during its time at Thaj, including a general survey of the site and the surrounding topography.

Excavations have uncovered letters, drawings and inscriptions in a number of tombs on hills around the ancient city, and rock samples collected from the northern part of the dig have been used to date it, as well as trace geological events during its history.


Saudi Arabia’s first female CEO makes Forbes 100 most powerful women

Updated 13 December 2019

Saudi Arabia’s first female CEO makes Forbes 100 most powerful women

Saudi Arabia’s first female CEO is named in Forbes 100 most powerful women in the world for a second time.

Rania Nashar, Samba Financial Group CEO, was ranked 97th in the list that also included 16-year-old climate change activist Greta Thunberg.

The list also included the United Arab Emirates’ Raja Easa Al-Gurg ranked at 84. The Emirati, who is a Board Member of the Dubai Chamber of Commerce and Industry, was also featured in the list in 2017.

The top 10 in the list included German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Christine Lagarde, who was newly appointed president of the European Central Bank.