Earliest photo of Makkah on display at the Louvre Abu Dhabi

The earliest image of Makkah by Sadiq Bey in 1881. (Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris)
Updated 01 April 2019
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Earliest photo of Makkah on display at the Louvre Abu Dhabi

  • The exhibition will be open from April 25 till July 13
  • It will feature images of the world from the time period between 1842 - 1896

DUBAI: A photograph of Makkah, shot by Muhammad Sadiq Bey in 1881, will be displayed in Louvre Abu Dhabi’s first photography exhibition starting April 25, one of the earliest images taken in Saudi Arabia.

Photographs 1842 – 1896: An Early Album of the World will be open for visitors until July 13. It is the second international exhibition the museum will host this year.




(musée du quai Branly – Jacques Chirac)

The museum will display some of the earliest 250 photographs of the Middle East, Africa, Asia and the Americas, taken between 1842 and 1896, including some of the oldest photographs of Saudi Arabia and Yemen by Auguste Barthold.

Mohamed Khalifa Al-Mubarak, chairman of the Department of Culture and Tourism in Abu Dhabi, said the exhibition aims to “showcase part of our inspiring human heritage.”

“Photography is one of the most important tools that has contributed to documenting the history of the world and its diverse cultures,” he added.




(musee du quai Branly – Jacques Chirac)

The exhibition is organized by Louvre Abu Dhabi in collaboration with musée du quai Branly – Jacques Chirac and Agence France-Muséums, and is sponsored by the Bank of Sharjah.

Most of the images come from musée du quai Branly – Jacques Chirac’s collection, with some images from the Bibliothèque Nationale de France, musée national des arts asiatiques – Guimet, Musée d’Orsay, la Société de Géographie and La Cité de la Céramique – Sèvres & Limoges.

The museum will feature works by renowned photographers, such as Luis Garcia Hevia from Colombia, the Abdullah brothers and Pascal Sebah from Turkey, Lala Deen Dayal from India, Marc Ferrez from Brazil, Lai Fong from China, Kassian Cephas from Indonesia, Alexandre Michon and Nikolai Charushin from Russia, Francis Chit from Thailand, and Ichida Sôta and Suzuki Shin'ichi II from Japan.




(musee du quai Branly – Jacques Chirac)

The exhibition will be accompanied by a number of educational and cultural activities related to photography, such as workshops, film screenings, a conference and a cine-concert.

The cine-concert, In the Land of the Head Hunters, is a musical interpretation of a Native American version of Rome and Juliet silent movie by French musician Rodolphe Burger.

Visitors can enjoy a multimedia tour of the exhibition in Arabic, English and French.


Celine Dion returns to Canada to kick off world tour

Updated 19 September 2019

Celine Dion returns to Canada to kick off world tour

  • The Grammy winner also recently announced the release of a new album titled “Courage”
  • She said in April that she felt motivated to create new music and hit the road after the 2016 death of her husband and manager

QUEBEC CITY: After living and crooning for years in Las Vegas, French-Canadian superstar Celine Dion returned home to Quebec to kick off her first world tour in a decade on Wednesday.
At 51, the Grammy winner also recently announced the release of a new album titled “Courage,” which will be her 12th in English and is due out on November 15.
The first single “Flying On My Own,” featuring her powerful vocals backed by techno beats, has already hit the airwaves, while three more dropped Wednesday: “Courage,” “Lying Down” and “Imperfections.”
Known for her blockbuster ballads, Dion said in April that she felt motivated to create new music and hit the road after the 2016 death of her husband and manager Rene Angelil.
“When I lost Rene, he wanted me back on stage. He wanted to make sure I was still practicing my passion,” she said. “I wanted to prove to him that I’m fine, we’re fine, we’re going to be OK. I’ve got this.”
So, after more than 1,140 concerts for 4.5 million fans over 16 years in Sin City, she bid adieu to the Colosseum at Caesars Palace with a final two-hour show.
“Courage is exactly the way I feel,” she told public broadcaster CBC at the time, talking up the upcoming tour of the same name.
“In the past three years, it has been difficult for me to talk to my children, to raise them, to lose my husband, wondering am I going to sing again... so much has happened, but at the same time I feel that I’m in control of my life.”
Some 60 dates in North American have been confirmed so far, her label said, with two arena shows in Quebec City on Wednesday and Saturday kicking off the tour, which will run through April 2020, and will be her first world tour since 2008-2009.
Her show was almost two hours of mastery, as she performed some of her greatest hits — from “I’m Alive” to “My Heart Will Go On” — as well as new material to an ecstatic crowd of roughly 20,000.
“It was really impossible to miss Celine at home,” Nicolas Delivre, a French university exchange student in Montreal, told AFP.
Donald Berard, from Quebec City, said he had grown up listening to Dion. “We love her like a member of our family.”
“Courage” marks the first album and tour in Dion’s long career without Angelil, who steered her success beginning in 1981 when he mortgaged his house to finance the young teen’s debut album.
The pair began a personal relationship in 1988 when she was only 19 years old, and married in a lavish ceremony in 1994. Angelil died of throat cancer at age 73.
In an interview with NBC’s Today show, Dion revealed that she longs for the hugs and laughs that come with a relationship, but added, “I’m not ready to date.”
The youngest of a family of 14 children raised in the suburbs of Montreal, Dion has sold 250 million copies of 23 studio albums in English and French, including collaborations with French singer-songwriter Jean-Jacques Goldman, Barbra Streisand and Stevie Wonder.
Back in Canada, she told the Montreal Gazette that the tour schedule was “a little crazy,” but that she had found time in advance to take in life’s small pleasures.
At a press junket last Friday, Dion told Radio-Canada: “There are good wines that age well, and there are good wines that age badly. I hope to be a good bottle of wine.”
“I’m not a new Celine,” Dion added. “I’m a continuity of myself.”