Saudi Arabia signs cybersecurity cooperation agreement

Saudi Arabia’s National Cybersecurity Center (NCSC) and World Economic Forum (WEF) officials sign a memorandum of intent to enhance cybersecurity and identify potential opportunities for collaboration in projects and initiatives. (SPA)
Updated 13 April 2019

Saudi Arabia signs cybersecurity cooperation agreement

The Kingdom’s National Cybersecurity Center (NCSC) signed an agreement on Friday with the World Economic Forum (WEF) to explore cybersecurity cooperation, the Saudi Press Agency reported.

The memorandum of intent is aimed at enhancing cybersecurity, protecting against threats, and identifying potential opportunities for collaboration in projects and initiatives.

It was co-signed by the deputy governor for strategy and planning, Dr. Ibrahim Al-Freih, and managing director and head of compliance and institutional affairs at the WEF, Alois Zwinggi.

The NCSC’s vision is to build a resilient and secure cyberspace that protects national and citizens’ interests, and foster the growth of Saudi Arabia’s economy.

It provides defense systems, technology and guidance to protect communication systems against attacks to confidentiality, integrity, processes, and vulnerability in the nation’s communications infrastructure.

The NCSC has previously issued basic cybersecurity guidelines to minimize the risk of threats to different government agencies. The guidelines were prepared to establish minimum standards to safeguard government networks and systems, and the Kingdom’s vital economic and national interests.

Applying these guidelines is mandatory for all government agencies, including ministries, authorities, institutions, and others, in addition to private sector agencies that own, operate, or host sensitive national infrastructures.

The WEF is an independent international organization committed to global development by involving business, politicians, academics and other community leaders, for formulation of global, regional and industrial agendas.


Pilgrims to quarantine for 14 days after Hajj

More than 41,361 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests have been conducted in the past 24 hours. (SPA)
Updated 04 August 2020

Pilgrims to quarantine for 14 days after Hajj

  • COVID-19 cases in Saudi Arabia continue to fall, officials say

JEDDAH: Pilgrims who took part in this year’s Hajj must continue wearing electronic tags so authorities can track their 14-day quarantine once they return home.

The bracelet is designed to monitor pilgrims’ adherence to quarantine, as well as monitoring and recording their health status through the “Tatamman” app.
Pilgrims were required to quarantine before embarking on the Hajj and wore the bracelets to ensure they were obeying the self-isolation rules as part of strict measures to contain the spread of coronavirus.
The country continues to experience a decline in COVID-19 cases. Recorded infections remain below the 2,000 mark for the 10th day in a row. The Kingdom reported 1,258 new cases of COVID-19 on Monday, raising the number of those infected to 280,093 so far.
There are currently 35,091 active cases and six patients were admitted to critical care units, raising the number to 2,017. There were 32 new fatalities, raising the death toll to 2,949.
There were 1,972 new recoveries recorded, raising the total number of recoveries to 242,053.
More than 41,361 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests have been conducted in the past 24 hours. The total number of PCR tests conducted to date exceeds 3.47 million.

INNUMBERS

280,093 COVID-19 cases

242,053 Recoveries

35,091 Active cases

2,949 Total deaths

3.47m PCR tests

The Ministry of Health has been carrying out daily visits to health institutions in order to assess their level of commitment to anti-coronavirus measures, such as ensuring that staff adhere to social distancing, wear masks, and adopt the health practices and crisis management mechanisms recommended by authorities to protect patients and staff.
Teams have been dispatched to supervise the compliance of health facilities’ quarantine centers across Saudi Arabia and stepped up their visits to government and private hospitals to ensure their compliance with health protocols, sample transfers and staff testing as well as ensuring that all routine surgeries are stopped.
More than 5,000 violations have been recorded and violators were referred to committees. More than 150 facilities were temporarily shut down by the ministry until the proper protocols were implemented and the violations were fixed. A number of institutions were able to resume operations after settling fines.