Egypt and Liverpool star Mohamed Salah included in Time’s 2019 influential people list

Liverpool and Egypt striker Mohamed Salah has been named in Time magazine’s 100 most influential people of 2019. (Screenshot/Time Magazine)
Updated 17 April 2019

Egypt and Liverpool star Mohamed Salah included in Time’s 2019 influential people list

  • The star footballer was listed within the “Titans” section of the list
  • Salah is joined by fellow Arab and Muslim celebrities such as Rami Malek and Mahershala Ali

LONDON: Liverpool and Egypt striker Mohamed Salah has been named in Time magazine’s 100 most influential people of 2019.
The star footballer was listed within the “Titans” section of the list — which includes a record 48 women — and was championed by British comedian and US TV host John Oliver.
Oliver said of the Egyptian: “Mohamed Salah is a better human being than he is a football player. And he’s one of the best football players in the world.
“Mo is an iconic figure for Egyptians, Scousers and Muslims the world over, and yet he always comes across as a humble, thoughtful, funny man who isn’t taking any of this too seriously.”
Also in the “Titans” section were fellow sport stars LeBron James and Tiger Woods. The darling of women’s tennis Naomi Osaka was also in the list.
Salah is joined by fellow Arab and Muslim celebrities such as Rami Malek and Mahershala Ali, as well as Abu Dhabi’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed Al-Nahyan.
Various world leaders have been named in 2019’s list — including US President Donald Trump, China’s Xi Jinping, Pope Francis, Pakistani prime minister Imran Khan, New Zealand’s PM Jacinda Ardern, as well as the prime ministers of Israel Benjamin Netanyahu and Ethiopia Abiy Ahmed.
Time Editor-in-Chief Edward Felsenthal wrote of the list: “We all have teachers, some we know intimately, others who inspire from the page or the screen. This holds true even for the most accomplished people on earth.
“Our annual Time 100 issue is filled with tributes from teachers to students; in many cases, the surprise is who is playing which role today.”


Reuters TV crew hit by rubber bullets as police disperse Minneapolis protesters

Updated 31 May 2020

Reuters TV crew hit by rubber bullets as police disperse Minneapolis protesters

  • ‘A police officer that I’m filming turns around points his rubber-bullet rifle straight at me’

MINNEAPOLIS: Two members of a Reuters TV crew were hit by rubber bullets and injured in Minneapolis on Saturday night when police moved into an area occupied by about 500 protesters in the southwest of the city shortly after the 8 p.m. curfew.
Footage taken by cameraman Julio-Cesar Chavez showed a police officer aiming directly at him as police fired rubber bullets and tear gas to disperse the crowd.
“A police officer that I’m filming turns around points his rubber-bullet rifle straight at me,” said Chavez.
Minutes later, Chavez and Reuters security adviser Rodney Seward were struck by rubber bullets as they took cover at a nearby gas station.
On footage captured as they ran for safety, several shots are heard ringing out and Seward yells, “I’ve been hit in the face by a rubber bullet.”
Asked about the incident, Minneapolis Police Department spokesman John Elder requested a copy of the video and made no immediate comment.
Seward is seen in later footage being treated by a medic near the scene for a deep gash under his left eye. Both men sustained injuries to their arms, and Chavez was hit in the back of the neck.
The Reuters journalists were clearly identified as members of the news media. Chavez was holding a camera and wearing his press pass around his neck. Seward was wearing a bullet proof vest with a press label attached.
The incident was the latest attack on a journalist covering the protests that have erupted around the United States after the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.
A black CNN journalist was arrested on camera while covering the protests in Minneapolis on Friday.
A Louisville, Kentucky, television reporter yelled, “I’m getting shot” as she was seen live on camera on Friday being hit by what appeared to be a pepper ball. The Louisville Metro Police Department apologized for that incident.
The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, according to the New York Times, had received about 10 reports involving journalists during the recent protesting, ranging from assaults to menacing.