Arab News at 44: the year we made the headlines

Arab News at 44: the year we made the headlines
Arab News celebrates its 44th anniversary on Saturday as the biggest English-language daily in Saudi Arabia. (AN Photo)
Updated 21 April 2019

Arab News at 44: the year we made the headlines

Arab News at 44: the year we made the headlines
  • Arab News celebrates its 44th anniversary with a fast-rising global readership, and a host of new digital and print offerings
  • Throughout this year, Arab News has seen a significant increase in readership in the Kingdom and around the world

JEDDAH: Arab News celebrates its 44th anniversary today as the biggest English-language daily in the Kingdom with a fast-rising readership and a commitment to maintaining the quality journalism that has been a bedrock of the paper during its long history.

Throughout this year, Arab News has seen a significant increase in readership in the Kingdom and around the world, with new digital and print offerings, including the launch of the Pakistan edition, spearheading the newspaper’s global and digital expansion. A series of online and print elements — including Road to 2030, The Face, The Space, The Case and The Startup — draws attention globally and nationally.

A look back at the Arab News coverage that made headlines this year.

 

Arab News relaunch 

April 3, 2018: Arab News relaunched last year with a new design, and a new approach to stories that is better suited to the Internet age. Aside from a change in the newspaper’s masthead — the first since it began publication in 1975 — the newspaper had a radical redesign with an emphasis on elegant graphics and background facts giving richness to our stories. The relaunch — after an April Fools’ Day teaser campaign that suggested the paper would no longer be published in printed form — was announced at a gala dinner in Dubai.




Guests take a look at Arab News souvenir edition during the International Media Gala, organized by Arab News in Dubai. 

Women driving

June 24, 2018: The General Directorate of Traffic issued driver’s licenses to 10 women after a royal decree issued by King Salman in September 2017 announced the end of a decades-long ban on women driving. An iconic image of a Saudi woman driving by New Yorker magazine illustrator Malika Favre, commissioned by Arab News for the cover of its souvenir edition on June 24, was shared around the world. The design won two Awards of Excellence at this year’s Society for News Design honors. The cover image was also recognized in the international design awards run by HOW magazine. The end of the driving ban is a historic move that sends a clear message to the world that changes in Saudi Arabia under Vision 2030 are real and significant.

 

Prince Khaled bin Salman writes exclusively for Arab News

July 23, 2018: The world must confront Iranian aggression in a way that it failed to do in the 1930s with Adolf Hitler and the Nazis, Prince Khalid bin Salman, the then Saudi Ambassador to the US, warned in an exclusive political essay published in Arab News.

 

Imran Khan interview

July 26, 2018: In an exclusive interview with Arab News in July, Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf chairman Imran Khan said his country enjoyed a “very special relationship with Saudi Arabia” and he planned to nurture it further.

 

Hajj coverage

August 19, 2018: As part of Arab News CSR initiatives, we gave out tens of thousands of umbrellas to protect pilgrims from the sun during Hajj season. An Arab News team also covered all the major days of Hajj, including Mina, Arafat and Muzdalifah. A total of 2,371,675 pilgrims performed Hajj in 2018, according to the General Authority for Statistics. The pilgrims who came from outside Saudi Arabia numbered 1,758,722, while 612,953 came from inside the Kingdom. Saudi Arabia invited more than 800 foreign media representatives to cover Hajj events.




As part of Arab News’ CSR initiatives, the newspaper gave out tens of thousands of umbrellas to protect pilgrims from the sun at Hajj 2018.

 

Pope Tawadros II

Dec. 4, 2018: In an exclusive interview with Arab News Editor-in-Chief Faisal J. Abbas, Tawadros II, the 118th Pope of Alexandria, Patriarch of the See of St. Mark and leader of the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria, described events in Syria and Iraq, with the rise of Daesh, as “very painful,” and pointed out that Christians who had to seek asylum abroad were among the most affected. However, his concerns extended beyond the plight of Christians alone, and he argued that a “weakening of Arab countries” means “the weakening of Arabs as a whole … Christians and Muslims alike.”

 

Winter at Tantora

Dec. 20, 2018: The northern Saudi city of Al-Ula hosted a special season of events and festivities, as the Royal Commission for the Governorate of Al-Ula organized Winter at Tantora. The cultural festival was designed to showcase the wonders of Al-Ula, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, to the world. It included cultural events, a spectacular equine experience, and musical performances by some of the world’s greatest artists, such as Saudi singer Mohammed Abdo, Italian opera singer Andrea Bocelli, Iraqi musicians Ilham Al-Madfai and Kazem Al-Saher, Bahrain’s Rashed Al-Majid and Iraqi artist Majed Al-Mohandes.

 

MBS Asia tour
Feb. 17, 2019: Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s tour of Pakistan, India and China made headlines around the globe. Saudi authorities praised the outcome of the Pakistan leg of the trip, with deals worth $20 billion signed by the two nations. During his visit to India, Crown Prince Mohammed said that he expects Saudi Arabia’s investments in the country to be worth $100 billion in the next two years. The crown prince also witnessed the signing of agreements in investment, tourism, housing and information and broadcasting. In China, he met with Vice Premier Han Zheng and attended the China-Saudi cooperation forum. That was followed by a ceremony to sign agreements on petroleum, chemicals, investment, renewable energy and anti-terrorism.




Faisal J. Abbas, Editor in Chief of Arab News, presents a copy of the newspaper to Pakistan President Dr. Arif Alvi on Feb. 18, 2018 on the sidelines of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s Pakistan visit. (AN photo)

50:50 by 2020

March 7, 2019: The Arab News newsroom philosophy is based on gender equality. The proportion of women working for the newspaper rose to more than a third in 2018, moving closer to the goal of a 50:50 gender-balanced newsroom by 2020, according to the Arab News “gender equality meter,” published in March. Arab News last year outlined its aim to become the first newspaper in Saudi Arabia to have a gender-balanced newsroom. The announcement was made at the opening of the inaugural Arab Women Forum at King Abdullah Economic City. The drive, referred to internally as the “50:50 by 2020” initiative, covers all the newspaper’s bureaus and areas of operation.

 

Saudi National Day coverage

March 7, 2019: A video produced for Saudi National Day by Arab News scooped the top prize in an international media award ceremony held in Dubai. The video was commissioned to launch the newspaper’s ‘Road to 2030’ section which encompasses a series of reports focusing on tracking the progress and reforms happening in the Kingdom, such as allowing women to drive and reopening cinemas. The online video category at the WAN-IFRA Middle East Awards was the latest award given to the Saudi Arabian English-language daily since its relaunch in April 2018, after picking up silver in the “redesigned product category” at the WAN-IFRA Print Innovation Awards, held in Berlin on Oct. 9.

 

Preachers of Hate

March 25, 2019: Arab News in March launched Preachers of Hate — a weekly series, published in print and online, in which we profile, contextualize and analyze extremist preachers from all religions, backgrounds and nationalities. Subjects include the Saudi cleric Safar Al-Hawali, the Egyptian preacher Yusuf Al-Qaradawi, the American-Israeli rabbi Meir Kahane, the Yemeni militia leader Abdul Malik Al-Houthi, and the US pastor Terry Jones, among others.

 

Sharqiah Season
March 14, 2019: The Sharqiah Season, a 17-day festival in Eastern Province cities, delivered extensive entertainment for both Saudis and visitors to the Kingdom. Key events included the Red Bull Air Race and the Formula 1 H20 boat event, as well as concerts by Akon, Deadmau5, Pitbull and French Montana.

First anniversary of cinemas
April 18, 2019: Arab News marked the first anniversary of cinemas opening in Saudi Arabia. As part of the country’s Vision 2030 program of reforms, Saudi Arabia lifted a 35-year ban on cinemas, paving the way for theater chains to unveil ambitious plans to open hundreds of cinemas across the nation in the next decade. The Saudi government announced that SR131 billion ($35 billion) will be invested in cinema and theater construction, mainly in Riyadh, Jeddah and Dammam. The Kingdom’s cinema industry — which will serve a population of more than 32 million, most of whom are under the age of 30 — is expected to generate $1.5 billion in annual revenue by 2030.

 


Archbishop who taught pope to tweet says Iraq visit offers ‘consolation, hope’

Archbishop who taught pope to tweet says Iraq visit offers ‘consolation, hope’
Updated 02 March 2021

Archbishop who taught pope to tweet says Iraq visit offers ‘consolation, hope’

Archbishop who taught pope to tweet says Iraq visit offers ‘consolation, hope’
  • He ‘intends to reach the hearts of all Iraqis,’ ex-head of Vatican’s social media tells Arab News

ROME: The visit of Pope Francis to Iraq this week will send a message of “consolation and hope” to those who have suffered so much in the country, according to the archbishop who revolutionized the Vatican’s communications.

Claudio Maria Celli, who was president of the Pontifical Council for Social Communications from 2007 to 2016, worked closely with Pope Francis after helping convert Catholic leaders to social media to deliver their message to followers around the world.

As a result, the pope’s historic Iraq visit will be relayed through the various social media accounts, including @Pontifex, the account of Pope Francis.

“With this trip, the pope intends to reach the hearts of all Iraqis. He doesn’t want to talk just to the Christians who live in that country and who’ve suffered so much from war and persecution by Daesh,” said Celli. “He wants to bring his closeness … to the people, no matter what their faith.”

The 80-year-old Celli spoke of “hope of reconstruction for a people who have the right to rebuild peace thanks to the collaboration and respect between the religious and national identities that are present in Iraq. The pope believes very much in dialogue between religions.”

Pope Francis “will certainly bring a message of solidarity to the Christians who live in that country. He wants to be close to them as a brother and as a father, so that they feel that the universal Church shares the hardship lived by a community that has suffered too much and for too long from violence and fundamentalism,” said Celli.

BACKGROUND

• Pope Francis ‘will certainly bring a message of solidarity to the Christians who live in Iraq,’ says archbishop Claudio Maria Celli.

• In 2012, Celli helped Pope Benedict join Twitter as he transformed the Vatican’s communications into the social media era.

“He wants to help rebuild trust in a tomorrow that must be different from the past, a better tomorrow made of peace, prosperity, love and common good for all in a country that deserves to be able to look forward.” All this is part of a “great dimension of interreligious dialogue,” said Celli.

In 2012, Celli helped Pope Benedict join Twitter as he transformed the Vatican's communications to keep up with the social media era. He also established a YouTube channel for the pope.

He once stated that Catholic media “should not become instruments of a religious or cultural fundamentalism.”

Pope Francis’s memorable tweets

With 18.8 million followers the @Pontifex twitter account belonging to Pope Francis has become a powerful tool for him to communicate with both the Catholic faithful and the wider world.

Here are some occasions when his account has been used to send messages of reassurance, hope and concern to issues related to the Middl East.

Aug. 5, 2020

The pope issues condolences and a broader message to Lebanon and its politicians after the devastating blast in Beirut Port.

 

 

Nov. 20, 2020

The pope sent a joint tweet along with the Imam of Al-Azhar Sheikh Ahmed Al-Tayeb reaffirming their commitment to the Document on Human Fraternity signed a year earlier.

 

 

Feb. 3, 2019

Ahead of the first visit by a pope to the UAE, Pope Francis tweeted that he was visiting the Emirates “as a brother, in order to write a page of dialogue together.”

 

 

Feb. 12, 2021

The pope sent a powerful message to coincide withe the UN day against the use of child soldiers

 

 

Feb. 8, 2021

Pope Francis has long campaigned against human trafficking and slavery.

 

 


Diversity and Netflix dominate Golden Globes

Diversity and Netflix dominate Golden Globes
Updated 01 March 2021

Diversity and Netflix dominate Golden Globes

Diversity and Netflix dominate Golden Globes
  • ‘Nomadland’ wins best drama movie at mainly virtual Hollywood ceremony

LOS ANGELES: Drama “Nomadland” and satire “Borat Subsequent Moviefilm” won movie honors at the Golden Globes on Sunday in a mostly virtual bicoastal ceremony that was marked by impassioned calls for more diversity and the dominance of Netflix.

“Nomadland,” a moving drama about van dwellers in recession-hit America from Searchlight Pictures, also took the best director prize for Chinese-born Chloe Zhao. It made Zhao only the second woman to win at the Globes in that category, and the first woman director of Asian descent to win.

“For everyone who has gone through this difficult and beautiful journey at some point in their lives, this is for you,” said Zhao.

“We don’t say goodbye, we say see you down the road,” she said, quoting a line from the movie.

The two wins for “Nomadland” increased the profile of the film ahead of nominations in March for the Oscars.

Sacha Baron Cohen, the creator of “Borat Subsequent Moviefilm” from Amazon Studios was named best comedy movie actor, while singer Andra Day was a surprise winner for her lead role in “The United States vs. Billie Holiday.”

“Donald Trump is contesting the result!” Baron Cohen joked about the win for the “Borat” sequel, which was a satire on the America of the former US president.

Netflix’s period drama “Mank,” about “Citizen Kane” screenwriter Herman Mankiewicz, had gone into Sunday’s show with a leading six nods but ended the night empty-handed.

Nevertheless, the streaming service was the biggest winner on Sunday, with four wins in the movie field and six for television, including best TV drama series “The Crown” and limited series chess saga “The Queen’s Gambit.”

The usual chummy gathering of A-listers at a gala dinner in Beverly Hills, California, was replaced by webcams in the homes of celebrities that were either dressed up or, like “Ted Lasso” star Jason Sudeikis, in casual garb.

Hosted by Tina Fey in New York and Amy Poehler in Beverly Hills, the small physical audiences were made up of masked frontline workers.

Peter Morgan, creator of “The Crown” said he missed being together. “I’m just sorry I am sitting here in my tragic little office and not surrounded by the people who make this show such a pleasure,” Morgan said, appearing by video.

However, Jodie Foster, a best supporting actress winner for the Guantanamo prison legal drama “The Mauritanian,” told reporters backstage that she felt it was one of the best Golden Globe shows ever. “It didn’t feel like it was filled with so much artifice,” said Foster.

Emotional high points included a posthumous best actor award for Chadwick Boseman, who died at age 43 last August from an undisclosed battle with cancer. “He would say something beautiful,” said his widow Simone Ledward Boseman, as she fought back tears. “I don’t have his words.”

British actors Daniel Kaluuya and John Boyega were among other Black winners chosen by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA), which has been lambasted in recent days for having no Black people among its 87 members.

“Soul,” the first Pixar movie to have a Black character in the lead, was named best animated movie and won best score.

The HFPA was the target of jokes and comments throughout the night. “We all know awards shows are stupid,” said Fey. “Even in stupid things, inclusivity is important and there are no Black members of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA).”

Members of the HFPA appeared briefly on Sunday’s show and pledged to do better.

Jane Fonda, 83, used her lifetime achievement acceptance speech to make the case for elevating all voices in Hollywood, saying that stories “really can change people.”


Vatican correspondent hails pope’s ‘historic journey’ to Iraq

Vatican correspondent hails pope’s ‘historic journey’ to Iraq
Updated 01 March 2021

Vatican correspondent hails pope’s ‘historic journey’ to Iraq

Vatican correspondent hails pope’s ‘historic journey’ to Iraq
  • Visit ‘could change the history of interreligious dialogue,’ Manuela Tulli tells Arab News
  • This will be her sixth trip embedded with Pope Francis

ROME: International media are following the pope’s visit to Iraq with enormous interest. Seventy-five journalists will travel aboard the special flight that will take the leader of the Catholic Church from Rome to Baghdad — almost double the number normally allowed on a papal flight. In addition, hundreds of reporters and camera crews will follow his visit on the ground.

“This is certainly a historic journey. Francis is the first pope to go to Iraq, and he’ll be the first head of the Christian Church to enter the house of Abraham in Ur, where the history of Christianity began,” Manuela Tulli, Vatican correspondent for ANSA — Italy’s main news agency — told Arab News.

She has been covering Pope Francis since he was elected in 2013. Though this will be her first visit to Iraq, it will be her sixth trip as an embedded reporter following him.

This journey “could change the history of interreligious dialogue,” and “may represent a historic turning point for Iraq,” she said.

“The pope will go to that country in the middle of the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. Then, of course, there’s the problem of security in Iraq.”

Pope Francis has expressed an interest in visiting the country and the Christians who live there since he was elected.

“The pope wants to go. He wants to send a message of peace to a land tormented by war and divisions,” Tulli said.

“He wants to go and say ‘basta’ (‘enough’) of war and violence. He isn’t afraid of the pandemic or any security issue.”

She said of the 75 journalists embedded with him, and the nearly 50 members of his entourage: “We’re on the same plane as the pope, and the Vatican has chosen the hotels where we’ll stay. We won’t be able to go around on our own. Also because the program is so tight, there will be no time to do anything else. We’ll have to stick to him around the clock.”

The pope is due to arrive in Baghdad on March 5, and will be welcomed by Iraq’s prime minister. He will then visit the country’s president at the presidential palace, where he will meet with local authorities, representatives of civil society and the diplomatic corps.

He will also meet with bishops and priests at the Syriac Catholic Church of Our Lady of Salvation in Baghdad.

On March 6, he will fly to the city of Najaf and meet with Grand Ayatollah Ali Al-Sistani. The pope will return to Baghdad that day and celebrate Holy Mass at the Chaldean Cathedral of St. Joseph.

On March 7 he will visit Erbil, capital of Iraqi Kurdistan, and meet with religious and civil authorities of the autonomous region. He will also visit the city of Qaraqosh. His return to Rome is scheduled for March from Baghdad.

“I expect Christians in Iraq will be particularly impressed to see the pope pronounce the Angelus, the Sunday prayer, from the Church of the Immaculate Conception in Qaraqosh, which Daesh used as a shooting range for its militiamen,” said Tulli.

“I’m sure that Francis will say a word of hope for those who’ve lived through terrible moments due to Daesh,” she added.

“The inter-religious prayer at Ur will be exciting. That moment will be like the closing of a circle for history.”


Facebook Launches #LoveLocal program for Lebanon

Facebook Launches #LoveLocal program for Lebanon
Updated 01 March 2021

Facebook Launches #LoveLocal program for Lebanon

Facebook Launches #LoveLocal program for Lebanon
  • A donation of $300,000 to LIFE, a Lebanese non-profit diaspora organization that connects Lebanese professionals around the world
  • The Centre will work together with Facebook to ensure that the #LoveLocal Lebanon SMB Program is accessible for SMBs in Lebanon

USA: Facebook is extending its #LoveLocal initiative, launched in September 2020, to Lebanon to help small and medium businesses (SMBs) in the country hit by the pandemic and Beirut blast.

The program was launched to help SMBs in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region pivot to digital and grow by highlighting several resources made available for their economic recovery.

The #LoveLocal Lebanon SMB Program has been developed in recognition of the fact that SMBs in Lebanon have been among the hardest hit by the economic situation as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly in the wake of the devastating explosion in Beirut last August.

“The multi-faceted effort will provide SMBs with financial support and capability building programs aimed at enabling their economic recovery as they navigate these very challenging times,” Ramez Shehadi, Managing Director of Facebook MENA, told Arab News.

Facebook partnered with Strategy&, a global strategy consulting business, to gain a better understanding of Lebanese SMBs’ needs in order to tailor the program specifically for Lebanon.

Ramez Shehadi, Managing Director for Middle East & North Africa, Facebook. (Supplied)

The program features include:

A donation of $300,000 to LIFE, a Lebanese non-profit diaspora organization that connects Lebanese professionals around the world, which will allocate the donation to SMBs in Lebanon. 3QA, a Lebanon-based third sector quality assurance organization, will offer support during the vetting and proposal stages.

A donation of $300,000 in Facebook ad credits to SMBs in the country.

The launch of “Ecommerce Start – Lebanon,” a boot camp program developed to support 100 SMBs as they look to build their e-commerce presence and become cross-border businesses. Additionally, selected SMBs will be eligible to receive an ad credit coupon. The boot camp is launched in partnership with Beirut-based e-commerce platform Ecomz and WPP’s global media agency Mindshare.

A series of free webinars to SMBs, in partnership with Seedstars, guiding them through the basics of digital marketing and skills to boost their business on Facebook and Facebook-owned platforms.

A collaboration with the International Chamber of Commerce-United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia Centre of Entrepreneurship (CoE) in Beirut to support outreach to the SMBs in Lebanon and the overall #LoveLocal Lebanon SMB Program.

The Centre will work together with Facebook to ensure that the #LoveLocal Lebanon SMB Program is accessible for SMBs in Lebanon.

“Businesses in Lebanon are particularly in need of support as they charge ahead through many layers of obstacles resulting from the Beirut blast months earlier and the many other compounding socio-economic complexities,” said Shehadi.


US accused of double standards over Khashoggi, urged to deploy same sanctions on killers of other Arab journalists

People gather to commemorate prominent Lebanese activist and intellectual Luqman Slim at place de la Sorbonne in the French capital Paris, on February 11, 2021. (AFP)
People gather to commemorate prominent Lebanese activist and intellectual Luqman Slim at place de la Sorbonne in the French capital Paris, on February 11, 2021. (AFP)
Updated 28 February 2021

US accused of double standards over Khashoggi, urged to deploy same sanctions on killers of other Arab journalists

People gather to commemorate prominent Lebanese activist and intellectual Luqman Slim at place de la Sorbonne in the French capital Paris, on February 11, 2021. (AFP)
  • Critics are asking why the US administration is not deploying the same standards to the killers of other journalists, and those involved with similar violence across the region
  • As the US continues to appease Iran in order to bring it back to the nuclear negotiation table, its proxies could get away with silencing even more journalists and critics

LONDON: After US President Joe Biden’s administration took measures to sanction Saudi officials that took part in 2018 murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, several Middle East experts have accused the US of deploying double standards.

White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki, as well as several US State Department officials, have repeatedly said that Washington will no longer tolerate the targeting of journalists and dissidents. The case of Jamal Khashoggi has been at the center of these statements.

However, critics are asking why the US administration is not deploying the same standards to the killers of other journalists, and those involved with similar violence across the region.

“We should ask ourselves what is the purpose behind the publication of the report? It is very obvious that the revival of the issue after two years aims at putting pressure on Saudi Arabia,” US-Arab affairs expert Dr. Dania Koleilat Khatib told Arab News.

Another commentator, Hussain Abdul-Hussain, tweeted: “Now that we have finished from the Khashoggi affair, can the US give any attention to the assassination of Hisham Al-Hashemi and Lokman Slim? Or is there no lobby behind them to demand the disclosure of their killers?”

Indeed, while this month’s killing of Lebanese publisher and vocal Hezbollah critic Luqman Slim was condemned by US Secretary of State Antony Blinken, that was as far as it went — and his statement even shied away from naming the known culprits, Hezbollah.

Another, Iraqi researcher, Hisham al-Hashimi, was shot dead outside his Baghdad home last year in a drive-by long-suspected to have been set up by Iran-backed Kata’ib Hezbollah.

“We also should examine the timing. It is while the US is seeking to go back to the nuclear deal. This could be a tool to pressure Saudi Arabia to accept the decisions of the US regarding Iran, and to coerce the Kingdom into making concessions,” Khatib said, adding: “They don’t want to disturb the flow of communications with Iran.”

She said: “Even though the US is committed to human rights, how adamant and forceful they are in taking a position is taken in a political context.”

While more critics of Iran, its proxies and allies in the region are shot dead by “unknown groups,” much of what the US clearly focuses on is what benefits itself politically. President Biden’s pursuit to label Saudi Arabia as a pariah, as he previously argued for, comes at the cost of allowing Iran and its armed groups in the region to literally get away with murder.

Lebanese journalists Samir Kassir and Gebran Tueini were vocal in their political criticism, and both were assassinated for their vocal critiques by perpetrators that have yet to serve justice.

Journalists killed with no consequences

 
Samir Kassir

Assassinated: 2 June 2005

 
Gebran Tueini

Assassinated: 12 December 2005
 

 
Atwar Bahjat

Assassinated: 22 February 2006
 

 
Hisham El-Hashemi

Assassinated: 6 July 2020

 
Luqman Slim

Assassinated: 4 February 2021

 

Arab countries and groups have expressed their support for Saudi Arabia’s rejection of the report, while stressing the pivotal role that the Kingdom plays in consolidating security in the region.

Political reporter and analyst Ray Hanania told Arab News: “The killing of Jamal Khashoggi is a human tragedy, but the US and the media are determined to play a hypocritical game of political exploitation to balance their foreign agenda.”

He added: “The International Federation of Journalists reports that in 2020, 66 journalists were killed, and yet it seems like only one journalist matters. This in part has also to do with media bias.

“The media, US Congress and activists showcase only one tragedy out of hundreds of journalist killings, because Khashoggi’s death is related to an acceptable foreign policy attack.”

President Biden took little time to retract the terrorist designation that the Trump administration had slapped on the Iran-backed Yemeni Houthi militia, and yet the group continues to lob ballistic missiles to Riyadh on a daily basis.

So as the US continues to appease Iran in order to bring it back to the nuclear negotiation table, its proxies could get away with silencing even more journalists and critics.