Indian Army’s Yeti ‘footprint’ pictures cause online storm

Men measure large foot prints in the snow, sighted by the Indian Army in the northeastern Himalayas. (AFP)
Updated 30 April 2019

Indian Army’s Yeti ‘footprint’ pictures cause online storm

  • Several Twitter observers asked why there was only one footprint when the beast would probably have had two feet

NEW DELHI: Pictures of a “Yeti footprint” the Indian Army posted on social media triggered a barrage of jokes Tuesday.

“For the first time, an #IndianArmy Moutaineering Expedition Team has sited Mysterious Footprints of mythical beast ‘Yeti’,” an apparently serious — though misspelled — tweet on the army’s official account said Monday, alongside three images of prints in the snow.

It added the “elusive snowman has only been sighted at Makalu-Barun National Park in the past,” referring to footprints reported by British explorer Eric Shipton in 1951 on the west side of Mount Everest.

According to folklore, the abominable snowman lives in the Himalayas but no proof of the enormous creature has ever been produced.

Social media users were quick to jump on the Indian military for its tweet. “With all due respect, institutions such as yours should be more responsible and careful before going ahead and declaring the sighting of any footprints as ‘Yeti’s’!”, said Kushal Prajapati.

“There’s been lots of research done on Bigfoot/Yeti (including sighting/footprints) with none proving its existence,” he added.

“Seriously disappointing to see Army propagating such foolish myths into reality. Expected better from you guys,” said another comment.

Several Twitter observers asked why there was only one footprint when the beast would probably have had two feet.

Others, were more forgiving, though still tongue-in-cheek.

“Congratulations, we are always proud of you. salutes to the #IndianArmy Mountaineering Expedition Team,” wrote Tarun Vijay, a leader of the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party. But Vijay said the snowman should not be referred to as “a beast.”

The army said the footprints measured 32 inches by 15 inches and were spotted by a team on April 9 close to the Makalu Base Camp, an isolated area on the Nepal-China frontier.

An army official said that pictures were released to “excite a bit of a scientific temper.” “We will share whatever we get with the domain experts to analyze. We will be contacting the team on the satphone in the evening for more details about it,” the official said.

The yeti is traditionally described as an ape-like creature, taller than a human, that lives in the Himalayas, Siberia, and parts of Central and East Asia.

Forensic results of previous samples have proved to be from prehistoric bears.


US posts new record daily virus caseload of more than 65,000

Updated 17 min 23 sec ago

US posts new record daily virus caseload of more than 65,000

  • US has registered a total caseload of more than 3.1 million, with 133,195 deaths

WASHINGTON: The US on Thursday posted 65,551 new coronavirus cases, a record for a 24-hour period, according to a tally by Johns Hopkins University.
The previous daily record was Tuesday, at more than 60,200 cases in one day.
For a third day in a row, US deaths climbed by more than 800, the highest levels seen since early June, according to the tally. Florida reported a record increase of 120 deaths and California had 136 new fatalities, not far from a record of 149 set the previous day, according to the tally.

With California, Florida and Texas recently breaking records, hopes are fading for an economic rival and US stocks closed down about 1% as investors worry another lockdown will cripple businesses.
Even outside the nation’s three most populous states, cases are rising. Alabama, Montana and Wisconsin recorded their biggest one-day rise in cases ever on Thursday. Infections are increasing in 41 out of 50 states, according to a Reuters analysis of cases for the past two weeks compared with the prior two weeks.
The United States, the hardest-hit in the world by the pandemic, has a total caseload of more than 3.1 million, with 133,195 deaths, making some Americans hesitant to return to public spaces and patronize businesses despite President Donald Trump’s efforts to downplay the risks.
US President Donald Trump's re- election campaign rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma on June 20 has been tagged by the head of the Tulsa-County Health Department to have "likely contributed"' to a dramatic surge in new coronavirus cases in the state.