Google bans app that features introduction from Muslim Brotherhood’s Al-Qaradawi

Google bans app that features introduction from Muslim Brotherhood’s Al-Qaradawi
Yusuf Al-Qaradawi regarded as the spiritual head of the Muslim Brotherhood. (AFP)
Updated 14 May 2019

Google bans app that features introduction from Muslim Brotherhood’s Al-Qaradawi

Google bans app that features introduction from Muslim Brotherhood’s Al-Qaradawi
  • The Euro Fatwa app was developed by the European Council for Fatwa and Research
  • The app was launched last month ahead of Ramadan

DUBAI: Google has banned from its online store a free-to-download app that featured an introduction written by Qatar-based Yusuf Al-Qaradawi, regarded as the spiritual head of the Muslim Brotherhood.

Euro Fatwa App, developed by the European Council for Fatwa and Research (ECFR), offers users a simple and concise guide “to enable the European Muslims to adhere to the regulations and manners of Islam and to fulfill their duties as Muslim citizens, while taking care of the legal, customary and cultural specificities of European societies.”

The ECFR, based in Dublin, launched the app last month ahead of Ramadan. The app is, however, still available on Apple’s App Store when Arab News accessed the site.

In the introduction to the app, the Egyptian-born cleric makes anti-Semitic references while discussing previous fatwas, or rulings regarding Islamic law. Al-Qaradawi, who has been residing in Qatar since 1961, was banned from the UK and France for extolling extremist views.

“While we can’t comment on individual apps, we’ll take swift action against any apps that break our policies once we’ve been made aware of them, including those that contain hate speech,” a Google spokesperson told Arab News.

Saudi Arabia, UAE, Bahrain and Egypt have placed Al-Qaradawi in the terror list for his support of the Muslim Brotherhood and espousal of violence across the Middle East. The US is considering the designation of the Muslim Brotherhood as a terrorist organization, a move that would impose economic and travel sanctions against the Islamist political group.

Al-Qaradawi has justified suicide bombings, especially in Palestine – even describing martyrdom as a higher form of jihad in his website; was openly hostile against Jews as a community and has issued religious edicts that demean women.

In one of his declarations against the Jews, Al-Qaradawi said on Al-Jazeera Arabic in January 2009: “Oh God, take Your enemies, the enemies of Islam … Oh God, take the treacherous Jewish aggressors … Oh God, count their numbers, slay them one by one and spare none.”


Ramadan series ‘Al-Tawoos’ to be investigated in Egypt over use of ‘inappropriate’ language

Ramadan series ‘Al-Tawoos’ to be investigated in Egypt over use of ‘inappropriate’ language
Updated 19 April 2021

Ramadan series ‘Al-Tawoos’ to be investigated in Egypt over use of ‘inappropriate’ language

Ramadan series ‘Al-Tawoos’ to be investigated in Egypt over use of ‘inappropriate’ language
  • Egyptian TV soap “Al-Tawoos” has become the first Ramadan series to be investigated by Egypt’s media regulatory body
  • The council said it had received “numerous complaints” about “the use of language that does not agree with the council codes”

CAIRO: Egyptian TV soap “Al-Tawoos” has become the first Ramadan series to be investigated by Egypt’s media regulatory body for its alleged use “of language offensive to family values.” 

The Supreme Media Council issued a statement Sunday saying it had launched an urgent investigation with those who produced the show and the television channel airing it, Al Nahar TV. 

The council said it had received “numerous complaints” about “the use of language that does not agree with the council codes.”

The regulatory body added that while it respects freedom of expression, it insisted that Egyptian family values must remain “a priority for purposeful art” in order “to preserve the identity and cohesion of families and move away from any image that distorts it.”  

“Al-Tawoos” – Arabic for The Peacock -- is set in a social context dominated by mystery and suspense, and stars Syrian actor Gamal Soliman, Egyptian veteran Samiha Ayoub, Sahar Al Sayegh, Khaled Alish, among others.  

Soliman plays the role of a veteran lawyer Kamal El Ostoul who specializes in compensation cases, but circumstances force him to investigate a rape case that turns his life upside down.

When the promo of the series first came out, it started trending among social media users who said they saw a huge resemblance between the show and the infamous Fairmont rape crime.  

The notorious case involved a group of men accused of drugging a girl and raping her as she lay unconscious at a private after party at the five-star Fairmont Nile City hotel. 

The crime has become a case of public opinion and has received international criticism. Some preparators remain outside Egypt and some others who were under arrest were released on bail. 

Though in the TV series has changed the occupation and socio-economic class of the survivor, yet the show still appears strongly inspired by the hotel gang rape case.


NEOM CEO talks AI health care, flying taxis with WIRED Middle East

Nasr — who will be appearing on a magazine cover for the first time — shared new details about the use of AI-powered health-care systems and flying taxis. (Supplied/WIRED)
Nasr — who will be appearing on a magazine cover for the first time — shared new details about the use of AI-powered health-care systems and flying taxis. (Supplied/WIRED)
Updated 18 April 2021

NEOM CEO talks AI health care, flying taxis with WIRED Middle East

Nasr — who will be appearing on a magazine cover for the first time — shared new details about the use of AI-powered health-care systems and flying taxis. (Supplied/WIRED)
  • Saudi Arabia’s Chief Executive of NEOM Nadhmi Al-Nasr has shared new details about the ambitious mega city project
  • The cover issue, which will be released this week, features interviews with key executives from NEOM

DUBAI: Saudi Arabia’s Chief Executive of NEOM Nadhmi Al-Nasr has shared new details about the ambitious mega city project changing the landscape of tackling environmental challenges in urban planning.

“I dream of 200 or 300 years from today, when there is a NEOM model being developed worldwide that has helped reduce emissions, reduce the environmental challenge,” Nasr told WIRED Middle East in a rare media interview.

Nasr — who will be appearing on a magazine cover for the first time — shared new details about the use of AI-powered health-care systems and flying taxis, a press release shared with Arab News said.

The cover issue, which will be released this week, features interviews with key executives from NEOM who paint a picture of how urban planners are attempting to create a city that is expected to span centuries with the use of new technologies.

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman first announced the project NEOM at the Future Investment Initiative conference in Riyadh 2017. The crown prince said that the 170-km coastal strip in the northwest of the country would be free of cars and streets, with zero carbon emissions.

The smart city will be powered entirely by clean energy, a major step in Saudi Arabia’s shift away from an oil-based economy.

The first phase of the $500 million project is scheduled for completion by 2025.


Veteran producer, cameraman in Iraq dies of COVID-19

Veteran producer, cameraman in Iraq dies of COVID-19
This 2003 photo shows Khodeir Majid at the AP office at the Palestine hotel. (AP)
Updated 17 April 2021

Veteran producer, cameraman in Iraq dies of COVID-19

Veteran producer, cameraman in Iraq dies of COVID-19
  • He went on to cover the breakdown in security and the sectarian bloodbath that prevailed for years, as well as the US occupation, the rise of the Al-Qaeda terror network, and finally, the war against the Daesh group

BEIRUT: Khodeir Majid, who covered Iraq’s numerous conflicts as a video producer and cameraman for The Associated Press for over 17 years, has died, relatives said Friday. He was 64.
The cause of death was complications due to the coronavirus. Majid had been hospitalized for about three weeks, but his condition rapidly deteriorated in the last few days and he died Friday morning.
Majid joined the AP in Baghdad in March 2004, a year after the US-led invasion that toppled Saddam Hussein in 2003. He went on to cover the breakdown in security and the sectarian bloodbath that prevailed for years, as well as the US occupation, the rise of the Al-Qaeda terror network, and finally, the war against the Daesh group.
Killings, kidnappings and bombings were an everyday occurrence, sometimes with multiple bombings on the same day.
Through it all, Majid, known as Abu Amjad to family and friends, was a beloved colleague and a calming presence in the Baghdad bureau. He was a dedicated journalist and a good friend to many, working quietly and behind the scenes to make sure accreditation and paperwork were secured, badges were collected, interviews were nailed and stories were covered. “Abu Amjad was a rare source of joy during difficult times working in Baghdad for the past 17 years. He will be remembered as a kind and dedicated professional,” said Ahmed Sami, the AP’s senior producer in Baghdad.

BACKGROUND

Majid was buried in Iraq’s Shiite city of Najaf Friday. He is survived by his wife and five children.

Samya Kullab, the AP’s correspondent in Baghdad, recalled Majid’s dedication and commitment toward getting evasive ministers and officials to grant the AP interviews. “He chased the Transport Ministry for months recently. ‘He keeps saying next week but don’t worry, I will not stop calling’ — such was his dedication to getting the story.”
“I never forget,” he would say.
Kullab and other Baghdad colleagues also recalled his kindness.
“His wife would make these date biscuits he shared with me on one occasion. I mentioned casually that I liked them,” Kullab said. “The next day I had date biscuits to last a month.”
Majid was buried in Iraq’s Shiite city of Najaf Friday. He is survived by his wife and five children.


Acclaimed Turkish actor sued for ‘insulting president’ with Twitter posts

Acclaimed Turkish actor sued for ‘insulting president’ with Twitter posts
Genco Erkal. (Photo/Twitter)
Updated 18 April 2021

Acclaimed Turkish actor sued for ‘insulting president’ with Twitter posts

Acclaimed Turkish actor sued for ‘insulting president’ with Twitter posts
  • Genco Erkal, one of the most popular stage actors and theatre directors in Turkey, has claimed in speeches that playwrights were censoring their plays to receive financial support from local municipalities

ISTANBUL: Leading Turkish actor Genco Erkal, 83, announced on Saturday that he is facing an investigation for exercising his freedom of expression.

Erkal, an outspoken government critic, is being investigated for “insulting the Turkish president” and will give his testimony on Monday.

His social media postings on Twitter since 2016 are being examined, Erkal said, without giving further details.

“Insulting the president” has become a widespread excuse for launching investigations against prominent popular figures, with several top actors and musicians being investigated despite their age.

Charged with “insulting the president publicly” over critical remarks made during a TV program, veteran actors Mujdat Gezen and Metin Akpinar attended three hearings this year but were acquitted.

On the program, 79-year-old Akpinar blamed the social polarization in the country on the ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) and said that “maybe leaders could be hung from their feet or poisoned in cellars” if Turkey’s democratization process couldn’t be achieved peacefully.

During the same broadcast, 77-year-old veteran actor Gezen said, “[Erdogan] tells the people ‘know your place.’ Look Recep Tayyip Erdogan, you cannot test our patriotism. Know your place.”

Genco Erkal, one of the most popular stage actors and theatre directors in Turkey, has claimed in speeches that playwrights were censoring their plays to receive financial support from local municipalities and said that his award-winning theater, Dostlar (Friends) Theatre, had not received any support for years because of the support he gave to the anti-government Gezi protests in 2013.

Dostlar Theatre, founded in 1969, is known for staging plays that are critical of the government’s political line and that try to raise social awareness on specific topics.

In his Twitter posts, Erkal criticized the wrongdoings of the government and highlighted social problems.

Even at his age, Erkal still organizes countrywide tours each year to reach a wider audience in every province of the country and has staged a critical play — “On Living” — about the late Turkish poet Nazim Hikmet.

Erkal recites one of Hikmet’s poems when on tour: “Living is no joke, you must live with great seriousness like a squirrel, for example, I mean expecting nothing except and beyond living, I mean living must be your whole occupation.”

An administrative court in Ankara ruled in 2014 that the refusal of the Ministry of Culture and Tourism to offer funding to Erkal’s theater was “against the principles of justice and equality.”

Turkey ranked 154th out of 180 countries in the 2020 Reporters Without Borders’ press freedom index.

Between 2014 and 2019, Turkish authorities launched 128,872 investigations into insults against Erdogan, and Turkish courts sentenced 9,556 of those charged with insulting the president, including politicians, journalists, actors, elder people and even children.


Facebook launches #MonthofGood campaign for Ramadan

Facebook launches #MonthofGood campaign for Ramadan
Updated 17 April 2021

Facebook launches #MonthofGood campaign for Ramadan

Facebook launches #MonthofGood campaign for Ramadan
  • Instagram initially developed its Ideas of Good campaign, now in its third year, as a result of a key insigh

This Ramadan, Facebook is marking the holy month with a global campaign across its family of apps. The #MonthofGood campaign, which brings together Facebook, Instagram, Messenger and WhatsApp, aims to celebrate charity, collaboration and community.

Despite the social distancing resulting from the pandemic, Ramadan remains a time for charity and celebration. Globally, in 2020 people raised twice as much as in 2019 through Ramadan-related fundraisers across Facebook and Instagram. “We saw our users rally behind multiple causes, raising over $5 billion for nonprofits and personal causes through fundraisers on Facebook and Instagram,” Ramez Shehadi, Managing Director at Facebook MENA, told Arab News.

Instagram initially developed its Ideas of Good campaign, now in its third year, as a result of a key insight, said Shehadi, which was that “Ramadan is the kindest time of the year on the platform.”

“In 2019, we saw people post about not only charitable activities, but also finding time to reflect as well as bond with their families,” he said. There were more than 16 million uses of the word Ramadan and references to Ramadan hit 4 million in the 30 days leading up to the holy month. There was a 40 percent growth in the use of the word “kindness” on Instagram across the world in the 30 days leading up to the holy month.

“Last year was drastically different – we saw Muslims around the world spend their first Ramadan in lockdown and it was a unique experience to observe a season known for its strong sense of togetherness and collaboration, in isolation,” he said. However, the Muslim community found new ways of gathering, donating and celebrating virtually, which inspired the initial Instagram campaign.

In the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region and Turkey, more than 6.5 million people joined the Ramadan-related groups created in 2020. For instance, “LyedFeLyed اليد في اليد ” is a group created last year that aims to connect families in need with donors and associations. “As of May last year, it had already helped 700 families, within days of opening the group,” said Shehadi. Other groups that arose during the pandemic are “Stop and Help”, founded by Heather Harries, her husband and two sons from the UAE, which aims to lift community spirits during the pandemic by offering support to families in need of basic essentials and “UAE Fusion Socialites,” which is founded by Sharjah-based Pakistani mother, Ayesha Sohail, who uses her social media skills to help low-income families.

This year, Facebook has extended the campaign across all its platforms as the #MonthofGood because it’s a “no-brainer,” according to Shehadi. “As a collective for four apps, we have the opportunity to amplify this effect, providing more platforms and more tools for organisations and individuals to explore, express and inspire good.”

Facebook will be running various activations across the globe in locations including India, US, UK, Nigeria and MENA focusing on the pillars of kindness, community and charity.

These include:

“Ideas of Good,” a list of 30 kind deeds and do-good moments to act on virtually.

“Guide to Ramadan” by Canadian creator Sarah Sabry, in collaboration with her Muslim followers.

A pay-it-forward chain globally, which will be kicked off by creators such as Haifa Beseisso, Nabih Alkayali, Raha Moharrak, Logina Salah, and Adel Aladwani in the MENA region.

Live Suhoor Talks, a global series hosted by Muslim creators across the UK, Asia and MENA, featuring weekly conversations about topics ranging from food and fasting to mental health and wellbeing.

Facebook Watch and IGTV series with creators such as Khalid Al-Ameri and Manal Al-Alem and networks MBC, TVision, and Zee Entertainment.

A MENA-specific collaboration with Jordan-based Arabic podcast network Sowt spotlighting inspiring community leaders from the regional diaspora to talk about how they use Facebook Apps for virtual acts of kindness during Ramadan.

Spotlighting zakat-eligible nonprofits such as Rahma Worldwide, UNHCR, Heroic Hearts, Molham Volunteering Team and Zakat Foundation of America with active Ramadan fundraisers and campaigns to provide food baskets, supplies and medical aid to orphans, widows and refugees.

Additionally, Facebook will spotlight small and medium businesses (SMBs) that have inspired good this Ramadan. “These are businesses that have gone above and beyond to help people around them and their communities, with their acts of charity and kindness,” said Shehadi.

The increased time spent on Facebook’s apps during the holy month also presents a significant opportunity for advertisers. “Ramadan is one of the biggest and longest global festive moments. Given the current circumstances we are in, people need positivity during the holy month and therefore feel-good themes always work at Ramadan if you do it right.”

“It’s also powerful if you can connect people to a real-life opportunity to do good,” he said. For instance, in 2018, Facebook partnered with the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) and the creative agency Leo Burnett Beirut to boost blood donations during Ramadan in a campaign called “Giving is in your blood,” which reached more than 28 million people across the Middle East and increased blood donations by 36 percent on average.

“We see a lot of brands engage with consumers in a personalised and relevant way during Ramadan too,” he added. For instance, Nestlé MENA developed a bilingual, informative bot for Messenger, in partnership with Facebook’s Creative Shop, that raised awareness of the content and services provided by its brands during Ramadan and helped Nestlé to gain insights about its consumers’ eating habits and preferences.