Manga fan favorite coming soon to Gulf cinemas

Updated 23 May 2019

Manga fan favorite coming soon to Gulf cinemas

  • Set in Singapore, it is the first Detective Conan film based outside Japan
  • In 2018, “Detective Conan: Zero the Enforcer” was released across the Arab world

DUBAI: The Japanese animated film “Detective Conan: The Fist of Blue Sapphire” is set to be released in cinemas across the Gulf.

The film is directed by Tomoka Nagaoka (assistant director of “Detective Conan: The Crimson Love Letter”) and written by Takahiro Okura, while Katsuo Ono returns as music composer.

Set in Singapore, it is the first Detective Conan film based outside Japan. When a local billionaire plans to retrieve the world’s largest sapphire, which has been resting at the bottom of the ocean since the 19th century, a murder occurs.

Conan must go to the famous Marina Bay Sands Hotel in Singapore to solve the case and bring the culprit to justice.

It follows the 2018 film “Detective Conan: Zero the Enforcer,” and is the 23rd instalment of the “Case Closed” film series based on the manga series of the same name by Gosho Aoyama.

Detective Conan franchise regulars Minami Takayama, Wakana Yamazaki and Rikiya Koyama return as Conan Edogawa, Ran Mouri, and Kogoro Mouri respectively. Kappei Yamaguchi reprises his role as Kaito Kid.

BACKGROUND

The popularity of “Detective Conan” in the Arab world dates back to 2000, and is still dominant today as fans in the region eagerly welcome the new “Detective Conan” movies.

In 2018, “Detective Conan: Zero the Enforcer” was released across the Arab world and received rave reviews as audiences flocked to see Conan solve mysterious cases.

In Japan, “Detective Conan: The Fist of Blue Sapphire” sold more than 300,000 tickets and earned $3.8 million in box office sales on its opening day.

Topping the Japanese box office, the film grossed $17 million during its opening weekend, setting a new franchise record.

Remarkably, the movie unseated “Avengers: Endgame” from the top spot just one month after the latter’s official release.

“The Fist of Blue Sapphire” has since grossed more than $68 million in Japan, becoming the second-highest-grossing “Detective Conan” film after “Zero the Enforcer.”

The new film will be released  in the UAE, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Bahrain and Saudi Arabia on June 13.


Sumatran tiger kills farmer in Indonesia

Updated 13 December 2019

Sumatran tiger kills farmer in Indonesia

  • Tigers mauled to death another coffee farmer and seriously injured two Indonesian tourists in separate incidents in the province last month
  • Human-animal conflicts are common in the vast Southeast Asian archipelago, especially in areas where the clearing of rainforest is destroying animal habitats

PALEMBANG, Indonesia: A Sumatran tiger has killed an Indonesian farmer, police said Friday, in the third fatal attack by the critically endangered species in less than a month.
The 55-year-old was set upon by the big cat at a coffee plantation in South Sumatra province on Thursday.
Authorities said the dead man’s companion screamed in vain to warn him about the approaching predator.
“All of sudden, the tiger pounced on the victim,” local police chief Ferry Harahap told AFP on Friday.
The deadly attack comes just a week after a tiger killed another farmer in nearby Pagaralam.
Tigers mauled to death another coffee farmer and seriously injured two Indonesian tourists in separate incidents in the province last month.
Local conservation agency official Martialis Puspito blamed human encroachment on the endangered animal’s habitat for the spate of attacks, adding that residents were being warned to steer clear of the wilderness.
“We cannot drive out the tigers because the jungles are their habitat so it’s people who have to stay out of there,” he said.
Human-animal conflicts are common in the vast Southeast Asian archipelago, especially in areas where the clearing of rainforest to make way for palm oil plantations is destroying animal habitats.
Sumatran tigers are considered critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, with fewer than 400 believed to remain in the wild.