Princess Lamia bint Majed, secretary-general and a member of the board of trustees of Alwaleed Philanthropies

Princess Lamia bint Majed
Updated 01 June 2019

Princess Lamia bint Majed, secretary-general and a member of the board of trustees of Alwaleed Philanthropies

  • Princess Lamia founded Sada Al-Arab, a publishing company operating in Cairo, Beirut and Dubai
  • Princess Lamia has bachelor’s degree in public relations, marketing and advertisin

Princess Lamia bint Majed has been secretary-general and a member of the board of trustees of Alwaleed Philanthropies since March 2016.

Founded by Prince Al-Waleed bin Talal and Princess Ameera Al-Taweel in 2003, Alwaleed Philanthropies is a charitable and philanthropic organization. With a mission to alleviate suffering around the world and globally transcend international borders, it collaborates with a range of philanthropic, government and educational organizations on projects and initiatives that focus on four areas: Empowering women and young people, developing communities, creating cultural understanding and providing disaster relief.

In an opinion piece published in Arab News on gender equality, Princess Lamia wrote: “In Saudi Arabia, women’s participation in the development of the Kingdom is a key aspect of Vision 2030. Female participation and empowerment in society is also a key pillar of our work at Alwaleed Philanthropies.”

After earning a bachelor’s degree in public relations, marketing and advertising from Misr International University in Cairo, the princess founded Sada Al-Arab, a publishing company operating in Cairo, Beirut and Dubai, in 2003. She also co-founded Media Codes Ltd. in Egypt, and the Fortune Media Group in Lebanon and Saudi Arabia.

She is also an author, having published her first novel “Abnaa Wa Demaa” in 2010, which followed a stint as editor-in-chief of Rotana magazine between 2004 and 2006, and of Mada magazine between 2002 and 2008.


Saudi health minister promises to procure tested vaccine

Saudi Health Minister Tawfiq Al-Rabiah. (AP)
Updated 20 October 2020

Saudi health minister promises to procure tested vaccine

  • COVID-19 cases continue to decline in Saudi Arabia

JEDDAH: Saudi Health Minister Dr. Tawfiq Al-Rabiah on Monday said the Kingdom will procure vaccine for the novel coronavirus once it is confirmed to be safe and effective.

He said research on the vaccine is underway in a number of countries and the Saudi health authorities are following the developments.
The number of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) cases continues to decline in the Kingdom with the recovery rate from the illness rising to 96 percent. The minister attributed the decline on the “commitment to health precautions.”
“I also thank my fellow health practitioners for their wonderful efforts,” Al-Rabiah said.
Commenting on the second and stronger wave of COVID-19 in some countries, he said it was due to a lack of “commitment to social distancing” and failure to wear masks and taking other precautions.
He ruled out any leniency on part of the government in its fight against the virus. The minister said it is necessary to abide by precautionary measures to keep the virus at bay.

FASTFACTS

• Saudi Arabia recorded 381 new infections on Monday.

• With 16 new fatalities, the virus-related death toll has risen to 5,201.

“We (all) are in one boat, and the failure of some affects everyone, so we must work together” to check the spread of the virus.
He also advised people who show COVID-19 symptoms to visit Tetamman (rest assured) clinics.
“Appointments can be made through the ministry’s Sehaty app, and anyone who has any questions or wants to consult a doctor can call 937,” the minister said.
Saudi Arabia recorded 381 new infections on Monday. The total number of COVID-19 cases has reached 348,583 since the beginning of the outbreak in the Kingdom.
The Health Ministry said 16 more people died due to complications caused by the virus raising the death toll to 5,201. The ministry also reported 357 new recoveries. The total number of recovered cases has now increased to 328,895.