How Malika Favre’s Arab News cover image of a woman driving made its mark in Saudi Arabia

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French artist Malika Favre
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French artist Malika Favre who has created iconic covers for The New Yorker magazine.
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French artist Malika Favre’s design was recreated as a mural.
Updated 25 June 2019

How Malika Favre’s Arab News cover image of a woman driving made its mark in Saudi Arabia

  • An image that wrapped the special Arab News edition of June 24, 2018, took off as a popular symbol of the historic day
  • The French artist, whose mother is Algerian, is known for her minimal style and popular New Yorker covers

JEDDAH/RIYADH: An image by French artist Malika Favre, marking the day that women were allowed to drive in Saudi Arabia for the first time, has been formally recognised with a slew of awards after it became something of a cultural sensation.
The picture, commissioned to cover the special “Start Your Engines” edition of Arab News in June last year, took off as a popular symbol of that historic moment. It was downloaded as mobile wallpapers, replicated on hats, painted on a wall mural in Riyadh and, to celebrate its one-year anniversary, Arab News is giving away bumper stickers with it in today’s print edition.


It wasn’t just the masses that embraced the image. It went on to become the success story of the newspaper awards season, clinching seven design gongs, including the Society for News Design’s Award of Excellence for cover story illustration.
“For Arab News to be recognized on a global scale with so many awards is a great honor,” said Simon Khalil, global creative director at Arab News. “This highlights just how important this moment in history was for women across the Kingdom. We hope Malika’s work and our cover will empower women across the whole region.”
Favre, whose mother is Algerian, is an illustrator for The New Yorker, New York Times, Vanity Fair and Penguin Books. She’s known for her minimal style, with designs that are easily linked back to her through her use of vibrant colors and positive/negative spacing.
“As a champion of women for years through her unique creative style, Malika Favre was the obvious choice for our cover, and her illustration brilliantly captures the significance of this moment on the day Saudi Arabia changed forever,” said Khalil.
Favre’s illustration is of a Saudi woman in her headscarf, with her hands on a steering wheel reflected in her sunglasses (in the animated online version, her hands and the wheel move). “A story within a story,” the artist described it.
The artwork has resonated with a lot of people, to the extent that even those who were not Arab News readers at the time shared it and downloaded it in droves. Favre thinks that’s because it is about “empowering women and looking forward to the changes to come.”
Favre is a firm believer in celebrating even the smallest milestones in life. “The cover holds a very positive message, and I think this is what resonated with people out there, and especially the women of Saudi Arabia,” she said from her base in London.
Favre was not expecting Saudi Arabia’s reaction to the cover. “It is always an amazing feeling when an illustration starts having a life of its own.”
One Saudi female artist was especially moved by the cover. For a Panorama Mall contest in which she participated, Noha Al-Johar recreated Favre’s design as mural on the wall of the mall’s parking lot.
Al-Johar told Arab News that she went into the competition blindly, but then saw Favre’s illustration and knew what she had to do. For three days she replicated the design faithfully, right down to the street details in the oversized sunglasses.
When Favre came across a photo of the homage painted by Al-Johar, she shared it on her social media accounts. Al-Johar was very humbled by the attention. “I want to thank her,” she said. “She’s the definition of a visionary.”
Favre expressed delight at how her illustration has been received. “As an artist, getting awarded for a piece is very fulfilling,” she said.
“This cover was very important for me on a personal level as a woman, and I was really happy to see the image being shared, emulated and celebrated by other artists.”

From the archives: More about artist Malika Favre and her Arab News cover illustration


Saudi investment chiefs host students from one of world’s top business schools

Updated 26 January 2020

Saudi investment chiefs host students from one of world’s top business schools

  • The Saudi Public Investment Fund (PIF) hosted business major students from Harvard Business School (HBS) for a conference held at the capital’s King Abdullah Financial District

Riyadh: Saudi mega projects and regional and global investment opportunities were outlined to students from one of the world’s top business schools at a seminar in Riyadh.

The Saudi Public Investment Fund (PIF) hosted business major students from Harvard Business School (HBS) for a conference held at the capital’s King Abdullah Financial District.

As well as being introduced to the PIF, the visitors were briefed about ongoing mega projects, along with potential future investment plans both locally and throughout the world.

During their Saudi trip, some of the students took the chance to see for themselves evidence of the reforms taking place in the Kingdom by visiting Riyadh, Jeddah, and AlUla and exploring the Red Sea coast by car.

The PIF hosted the students as part of its aim of providing exposure to the broadest possible portfolio of businesses and careers while striving to be an employer of choice for top talents domestically and globally.

The fund continues to focus its commitment and dedication in providing a learning culture that promotes partnerships and training with world-class learning institutions, by actively incentivizing professional development and certifications.

HBS is an example of PIF efforts to build relationships with highly recognized learning organizations, and links in with its prestigious graduate development program to attract and develop top Saudi talent.

The study/work development program is delivered in partnership with some of the world’s top educational institutions, offering only 80 seats per application cycle. In 2019, only a fraction of the 12,000 applicants were accepted, and the PIF has attracted several Saudi HBS graduates as part of its human capital.

It is hoped that the visit to Saudi Arabia will encourage some of the HBS students to carry out their own research on the Kingdom to benefit sectors and resources such as the geology of Saudi deserts, Red Sea oceanography, and the sociology of its citizens.

By getting a close-up insight into the Kingdom it is also envisaged that students will return to the country as tourists, investors or for employment.