Baby son of UK’s Prince Harry and Meghan christened at private Windsor ceremony

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This is the official christening photo released by the Duke and Duchess of Sussex on Saturday, July 6, 2019, showing Britain's Prince Harry, front row, second left and Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex with their son, Archie. Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall sits at left. (AP)
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Britain's Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex (R), and his wife Meghan, Duchess of Sussex hold their baby son, Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor at Windsor Castle on July 6, 2019. (AFP/ Sussex Royal/ Chris Allerton)
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Britain's Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, during a photocall with their newborn son, in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle, Windsor, England. (File/AFP)
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Meghan, Duchess of Sussex places her hand next to her baby son during a photocall in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle, in Berkshire, Britain May 8, 2019. (Reuters)
Updated 06 July 2019

Baby son of UK’s Prince Harry and Meghan christened at private Windsor ceremony

  • The 2-month-old son of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex will be baptized Saturday in a private chapel at the castle by Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby
  • He will wear a lace and satin christening gown that was also used for his cousins Prince George, Princess Charlotte and Prince Louis

LONDON: The youngest member of Britain's royal family, Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor, was christened at Windsor Castle on Saturday in a private ceremony — too private for some royal fans.
The 2-month-old son of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex was baptized in a private chapel at the castle west of London by Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, head of the Church of England.
Palace officials said that, in keeping with royal tradition, Archie wore a lace and satin christening gown — a replica of one made for Queen Victoria's eldest daughter in 1841 — that was also used for his cousins Prince George, Princess Charlotte and Prince Louis.
He was sprinkled with water from the River Jordan at an ornate silver baptismal font that has been used in royal christenings for more than 150 years.
Archie, born May 6, is the first child of Prince Harry and the former Meghan Markle, and seventh in line to the British throne.
His parents released two photos taken by fashion photographer Chris Allerton, including a black-and-white image showing the couple cradling a tranquil Archie between them.
It was accompanied by a color portrait of the young family surrounded by relatives, including Harry's brother Prince William and his wife Kate; Prince Charles and his wife Camilla; Meghan's mother Doria Ragland; and Jane Fellowes and Sarah McCorquodale, the sisters of Harry's late mother Princess Diana.
Archie's great-grandmother Queen Elizabeth II did not attend the christening because of a prior engagement.
Meghan and Harry have faced criticism for declining to reveal the names of Archie's godparents, and not giving the public a glimpse of the event — though that didn't stop well-wishers coming to Windsor with Union Jack flags, banners and even a cake to mark the occasion.
The royal couple's decision sparked controversy in part because of the recent revelation that their Windsor home was renovated with 2.4 million pounds ($3.06 million) of taxpayers' money.
Royal fan Anne Daley, who brought a home-baked cake to Windsor, said she was "very hurt" by the decision.
"That baby is Princess Diana's grandson. We should be able to see the christening," she said.


Australian man survives croc attack by gouging its eye

Updated 16 November 2019

Australian man survives croc attack by gouging its eye

  • Wildlife ranger Craig Dickmann made a split-second decision to go fishing in a remote part of Northern Australia known as ‘croc country.’
  • ‘That noise will haunt me forever I think, the sound of the snap of its jaws’

CAIRNS, Australia: An Australian wildlife ranger has recounted his terrifying escape from the clutches of a “particularly cunning” crocodile, after wrestling with the reptile and sticking a finger in its eye.
Craig Dickmann, who made a split-second decision to go fishing last Sunday in a remote part of Northern Australia known as “croc country” last Sunday, said a 2.8-meter (nine-foot) crocodile came up from behind him as he was leaving the beach.
“As I’ve turned to go, the first thing I see is its head just come at me,” he told reporters on Friday from his hospital bed in the town of Cairns in Queensland state.
Dickmann said the animal latched on to his thigh.
“That noise will haunt me forever I think, the sound of the snap of its jaws,” he said.
The 54-year-old said he wrestled with the croc on the remote beach as it tried to drag him into the water.
Dickmann stuck his thumb into its eye, saying it was the only “soft spot” he found on the “bullet-proof” animal.
“Their eyes retract a fair way and when you go down far enough you can feel bone so I pushed as far as I possibly could and then it let go at that point,” Dickmann said.
After a few minutes, he said he managed to get on top of the croc and pin its jaws shut.
“And then, I think both the croc and I had a moment where we’re going, ‘well, what do we do now?’”
Dickmann said he then pushed the croc away from him and it slid back into the water.
The ranger had skin ripped from his hands and legs in the ordeal and drove more than 45 minutes back to his home before calling emergency services.
It was then another hour in the car to meet the Royal Flying Doctors Service who flew him to Cairns Hospital, where he is recovering from the ordeal.
“This croc was particularly cunning and particularly devious,” he said.
Queensland’s department of environment this week euthanized the animal.
“The area is known croc country and people in the area are reminded to always be crocwise,” the department said in a statement.
Saltwater crocodiles, which can grow up to seven meters long and weigh more than a ton, are common in the vast continent’s tropical north.
Their numbers have exploded since they were declared a protected species in the 1970s, with attacks on humans rare.
According to the state government, the last non-fatal attack was in January 2018 in the Torres Strait while the last death was in October 2017 in Port Douglas.