Saudi tourism chief examines final preparations for Taif Season

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The festival seeks to contribute to achieving the Kingdom’s Vision 2030 strategy, which aims to improve quality of life, raise living standards, and create career and investment opportunities. (SPA)
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The festival seeks to contribute to achieving the Kingdom’s Vision 2030 strategy, which aims to improve quality of life, raise living standards, and create career and investment opportunities. (SPA)
Updated 30 July 2019
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Saudi tourism chief examines final preparations for Taif Season

  • The festival focuses on highlighting the region’s historical and cultural status and artistic diversity

TAIF: Ahmed Al-Khateeb, president of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH), inspected the sites where Taif Season will take place. 

He did so in the presence of Taif’s Gov. Saad Al-Maimouni, its mayor, Mohammed Hameel, and the head of its police department, Maj. Gen. Ali Al-Atwi.

Al-Khateeb examined the final preparations before the launch of Taif Season, which will take place throughout August in four central locations that will host 70 main events.

He and his colleagues toured Souq Okaz, which will host pavilions, historical events and innovative cultural activities. 

They also visited Ward village in Al-Rudaf Park, the location of the Crown Prince Camel Festival,
and sites that offer a mountain-walking experience.

Al-Khateeb stressed to workers the importance of making visitors’ experiences remarkable. He commended government agencies and the private sector for their important role in the season’s preparation.

Top tourist destination

It aims to highlight Saudi Arabia as an international tourist destination, Taif’s historical and civilizational status, its cultural and artistic diversity, and its moderate climate.

Taif Season seeks to contribute to achieving the Kingdom’s Vision 2030 strategy, which aims to improve quality of life, raise living standards, and create career and investment opportunities.

“Taif Season is at full readiness
to receive families. It includes … recreational and qualitative cultural events all over Taif,” Al-Khateeb said.

The season depends on positive engagement with Taif’s residents, and is providing seasonal job opportunities for young men and women, as well as investment opportunities for regional entrepreneurs and small and medium enterprises, he added. 

Role of private sector

“We’ll celebrate a successful season,” he said, urging the private sector to contribute to enriching future ones.

The event also aims to provide thousands of temporary and
permanent jobs in the sector while encouraging investment opportunities.

SCTH officials said events being lined up for the Taif Season were part of coordinated efforts between the public and private sectors.

The aim of Taif Season was to consolidate its stature as a top Arab destination by putting the area’s rich history and culture under the spotlight with a range of family entertainment and tourist events, organizers said. 

Taif Season has its own dedicated social media account, in addition to the Saudi Seasons website. 


France: ‘not very credible’ that Houthis attacked Saudi oil plants

Updated 19 September 2019

France: ‘not very credible’ that Houthis attacked Saudi oil plants

  • The Frrench foreign minister said to wait for the results of the investigation
  • Iran, which supports the Houthi group, has denied any involvement in the attacks

PARIS: A claim from Yemen’s Houthis they were responsible for the attack on Saudi oil facilities is “not very credible,” France’s foreign minister said on Thursday.
“Yemen’s rebels have announced they have triggered this attack. That is not very credible, relatively speaking,” the minister, Jean-Yves Le Drian, told C News television.
“There is an international investigation, let’s wait for its results. I don’t have a specific opinion before these results,” he said, adding the investigation into the Saudi oil attacks will be fast.
The Trump administration and Saudi Arabia have pointed the finger at Iran for the Sept. 14 raids, which hit the world’s biggest crude oil processing facility and initially knocked out half of Saudi output.
Iran, which supports the Houthi group, has denied any involvement in the attacks.