Mosque in Ireland ‘severely vandalized’ in suspected hate attack

The Mosque, which serves the city’s 200 Ahmadi Muslims, had its locks and windows destroyed, as well as the security camera equipment stolen. (File/AFP)
Updated 30 July 2019

Mosque in Ireland ‘severely vandalized’ in suspected hate attack

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Association group suspects the involvement of two far-right Irish group members
  • The attack targeted the Maryam Mosque in the western city of Galway

A mosque in Ireland was left “severely vandalized” on Monday, a local Muslim group told the Irish Times

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Association group suspects the involvement of two far-right Irish group members in the attack on the Maryam Mosque in the western city of Galway. 

The Mosque, which serves the city’s 200 Ahmadi Muslims, had its locks and windows destroyed, as well as the security camera equipment stolen.

The office of the mosque’s Imam Ibrahim Noonan was also wrecked, the report said.

“The taking of the security equipment suggests an effort to hide their tracks. It indicates a level of planning and sophistication,” a police officer told the Irish daily.

The imam said he was warned of a planned attack on the mosque three months earlier by an unidentified caller.

The suspected two far-right groups were mentioned in the anonymous call with the name of a prominent UK far-right activist.

The attack on the Maryam Mosque is the second attack since it opened in 2014.

Groups like the Galway Anti-Racism Network planned with the Muslim community in Galway a gathering at the mosque on Monday night.


UK PM Boris Johnson urged to be ‘tougher’ on Iran

Updated 26 min 6 sec ago

UK PM Boris Johnson urged to be ‘tougher’ on Iran

  • Richard Ratcliffe says his jailed wife is ‘being held hostage’ by Tehran
  • Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe was detained in 2016 and sentenced to five years in prison

LONDON: The husband of a British-Iranian woman jailed by Tehran over charges of espionage has urged the UK to be “tougher” with the regime.

Richard Ratcliffe made the comments after a meeting with UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson in London on Thursday. 

Ratcliffe said there had been “no breakthrough” in discussions between the two nations to secure her release, and his wife was being used as a “chess piece” by Iran. 

Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe was detained in 2016 and sentenced to five years in prison for “plotting to topple the Iranian government.” She and her family maintain that she was in the country to visit relatives.Speaking outside the prime minister’s residence in Downing Street, Ratcliffe told reporters that the meeting had been warm in nature, but hinted that the government was not doing enough.

“The prime minister was there, the foreign secretary was there, (we) talked quite openly about having tried a number of different things to get Nazanin home,” he said. 

“We pressed him (Johnson) to be brave. I want him to push forward on improving relations. You need to be imposing a cost on Iran for holding innocent people as leverage, you’ve got to be brave there as well. The government doesn’t always say it, but in my view, Nazanin is being held hostage.”

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office was not immediately available for comment when contacted by Arab News.

The Downing Street meeting comes ahead of an impending court case over a long-term trade dispute between the UK and Iran, with London accused of owing Tehran debts over an arms deal from the 1970s.

Labour Party MP Tulip Siddiq, who represents the parliamentary seat of Hampstead and Kilburn, where Zaghari-Ratcliffe and her family live, called on the government to settle the debt in order to help facilitate her release.

But MP Jacob Rees-Mogg, the leader of the House of Commons, told the BBC that the issue was “extraordinarily difficult.” 

He suggested that setting a precedent of capitulating on legal disputes in return for the release of UK nationals could entice foreign governments and groups to threaten other UK citizens abroad. “The risk that would pose to British citizens traveling abroad would be very considerable,” he said.

Johnson was blamed by many in 2017, when he was foreign secretary, for having worsened Zaghari-Ratcliffe’s situation in Iran when, in a statement to the House of Commons, he claimed that he had been briefed that she was in Tehran training journalists. 

Despite claims from other politicians, her family and her employer, the Thompson Reuters Foundation, that he had been misinformed, the statement was subsequently used as evidence against her in court.