Google Doodle celebrates Egyptian actress Madiha Kamel’s birthday

Google doodle is giving tribute to Madiha Kamel, a famed Egyptian actress. (Google)
Updated 03 August 2019

Google Doodle celebrates Egyptian actress Madiha Kamel’s birthday

  • Kamel’s career spanned three decades, making her one of the most memorable names and faces in Egyptian cinema
  • She died in 1997 after suffering from breast cancer

DUBAI: Google celebrated what would be the 73rd birthday of iconic Egyptian star Madiha Kamel, with a doodle on Saturday.

Born in Alexandria in 1946, Kamel’s career spanned three decades, making her one of the most memorable names and faces in Egyptian cinema, before she died in 1997 after battling breast cancer.




Madiha Kamel started her career in the 1960s. (Facebook/Madiha Kamel Official)

Before shooting to stardom, Kamel did theater and radio sketches while studying at the Ain Shams University – honoring her parents’ wish that she finishes her education before fully diving into the movie industry.

In the mid-1960s, her onscreen career began taking off, appearing in films like “A Girl Like No Other,” and “30 Days in Prison,” where she co-starred with another Egyptian legend Farid Shawqi.




She was also known for her dance moves. (Facebook/Madiha Kamel Official)

Throughout her career, she worked with famous Egyptian names including Mahmoud Yassin and Najla Fathi, appearing in several movie and TV hits such as “The Choice,” “Love and Pride,” and “El Bashayer.”

She retired in 1992 to take care of her daughter, and to attend to her sick mother. 


Malaysian police chief insists Al Jazeera probe ‘professional’

Updated 05 August 2020

Malaysian police chief insists Al Jazeera probe ‘professional’

  • The government said the documentary tarnished the image of the country
  • Abdul Hamid said the investigation “will be very transparent”

KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysia’s police chief insisted Wednesday investigations into an Al Jazeera documentary are being conducted “professionally” and rejected concerns about worsening media freedom, a day after the broadcaster’s office was searched.
Authorities are investigating the news network’s program “Locked up in Malaysia’s Lockdown,” after the government was angered by its critical look at the treatment of migrant workers during the coronavirus pandemic.
Officials on Tuesday searched the Qatar-based broadcaster’s Kuala Lumpur office and seized two computers, sparking fresh anger from Al Jazeera and rights groups and adding to concerns about media independence in Malaysia.
But the country’s Inspector-General of Police Abdul Hamid Bador said the search by police and communications ministry officials was carried out “very professionally.”
“It was not a military kind of action taken by the police,” he told AFP in an interview.
He added that Al Jazeera staff were “informed earlier of our intent to be there. They were even asked which devices were used. They cooperated.”
The search came after seven Al Jazeera journalists were questioned by police last month in connection with the documentary.
Abdul Hamid said the probe would be wrapped up soon, after which the attorney-general will decide whether to bring charges.
But the government insists the documentary — which focused on alleged mistreatment of migrants when they were rounded up during a coronavirus lockdown in May — tarnished the country’s image.
Authorities say the round-up was necessary to protect the public from the virus.
Al Jazeera is being probed for alleged sedition, defamation and transmitting offensive content, but it has stood by the documentary and insists the reporting was impartial.
Abdul Hamid said the investigation “will be very transparent” and insisted journalists in Malaysia were still free to do their jobs.
But he also urged international media to “be responsible,” calling them not to “write something... that is inaccurate.”