Sudan protesters, army postpone announcement on ruling body

An elderly Sudanese man flashes the victory sign as he joins others celebrating after signing the constitutional declaration between the ruling military council and protest movement, in Khartoum, Sudan, 04 August 2019. (File/EPA)
Updated 19 August 2019

Sudan protesters, army postpone announcement on ruling body

CAIRO: Sudan’s ruling military council says the country’s pro-democracy movement has asked for a delay on the announcement of a joint ruling body because of last-minute, internal disputes over appointees.
The 11-member sovereign council is to rule Sudan for a little over three years until elections can be held.
It was created under a power-sharing deal between the military and the protesters and was to be announced on Sunday.
But the military council’s spokesman Shams el-Din Kabashi said Monday that the movement withdrew its appointees to the council and would hold more consultations among its factions.
The development comes after internal disputes within the Sudanese Professionals Association, one of the opposition factions, over its nominee. The SPA had spearheaded Sudan’s protests that led to the ouster of longtime autocrat Omar Al-Bashir.


Navy destroyer’s Beirut visit a ‘security reminder’: US envoy

Updated 5 min 6 sec ago

Navy destroyer’s Beirut visit a ‘security reminder’: US envoy

BEIRUT: The US Navy destroyer USS Ramage docked at the port of Beirut for 24 hours as a “security reminder,” according to Elizabeth Richard, the US ambassador to Lebanon.

“The US Navy is not far away, and Our ships were often near the Mediterranean, and will remain so,” the American envoy said.

Ricard and Vice Admiral James J. Malloy – the commander of the 5th Fleet – whose area of responsibility includes the waters of Arabian Gulf, Gulf of Oman, Gulf of Aden, Red Sea and the Arabian Sea, hosted ‘an on-board reception for US and Lebanese officials.’

USS Ramage is an Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer, named after Vice Admiral Lawson P. Ramage, a notable submarine commander and Medal of Honor recipient in World War II. The ship specializes in destroying guided missiles launched from warships, aside from providing multiple offensive and defensive tasks.

Richard assured that “the security and stability in the East Mediterranean are of utmost importance to the United States and to Lebanon as well, and with regards to the issue of oil derivatives that concerns more than one state in the region, we hope that Lebanon joins in, as the issue of maritime security will soon acquire more importance.”

She assured that: “the presence of the USA in these waters is of common interest, and the presence of the American destroyer in Lebanon is a political message.”

Richard also said that partnership with Lebanon was not limited to military cooperation, and that the USA is “committed to help the Lebanese people through this period of economic hardship, and to supporting the Lebanese institutions that defend Lebanese sovereignty.”

Meanwhile, Admiral Malloy said during the reception that “our military relations with Lebanon transcends the issue of military hardware, and the Lebanese armed forces have set plans to improve its naval capabilities, and the USA will continue playing the primary role in supporting these efforts.”

Built in 1993, the USS Ramage was put into active service in 1995 with a crew of almost 300 officers and enlisted personnel. It is 154 meters long and 20 meters and could reach a top speed of 30 knots, or 56 kilometers per hour.