KSA ‘must lead world’ in disability rights, Prince Sultan says

The agreement was signed by Prince Sultan bin Salman, chairman of the board of trustees of KSCDR, and Dr. Bandar bin Mohammed Al-Aiban, president of the Human Rights Commission, on Tuesday. Prince Sultan said KSCDR has taken the lead in embracing disability in the Kingdom. (SPA)
Updated 29 August 2019

KSA ‘must lead world’ in disability rights, Prince Sultan says

  • Under the KSCDR program, more than 1 million newborns received screening, says Prince Sultan

RIYADH: King Salman Center for Disability Research (KSCDR) and Saudi Arabia’s Human Rights Commission signed a joint memorandum of understanding (MoU) to promote and protect the rights of persons with disabilities and to achieve the best standards in this domain. The MoU was co-signed by Prince Sultan bin Salman, chairman of the board of trustees of KSCDR, and Dr. Bandar bin Mohammed Al-Aiban, president of the Human Rights Commission.
Prince Sultan said in a press statement following the signing of the MoU: “The signing of this agreement comes in culmination of years of active and fruitful partnership between KSCDR and the Human Rights Commission.”
He said that under the MoU the two sides will coordinate their areas of specialty to promote and protect the rights of persons with disabilities and to achieve the best standards in this domain, including contributing to the review and development of the relevant regulations, rules and procedures.
Prince Sultan pointed out that KSCDR, under the guidance and supervision of King Salman, has taken the lead in embracing disability, establishing relevant legislation governing the cause, and establishing the Authority for the Care of Persons with Disabilities (ADP) based on strong government, charitable and civil practice, as well as experience of more than three decades.
He said: “KSCDR has several programs on persons with disabilities, who need care and attention to be able to integrate into society in a way that suits them. These programs include the Universal Access Program that came from the Disability Welfare Act.”
“KSCDR has also adopted the National Newborn Screening Program to detect metabolic disorders that cause disabilities. This program has been imposed in the majority of the Kingdom’s hospitals and more than 1 million newborns have been screened.”
Prince Sultan said that KSCDR is implementing the National Newborn Screening Program in cooperation with the Ministry of Health, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, and all other health sectors in the Kingdom.

HIGHLIGHTS

• The deal aims to raise community awareness on physical and mental impairments.

• The Kingdom must become the global leader in protecting the rights of persons with disabilities, says Prince Sultan.

• The initiative focuses on detecting 20 genetic disorders that may lead to mental underdevelopment and acute morbidity conditions.

“It aims to detect 20 genetic disorders that lead to mental underdevelopment and acute morbidity conditions, some of which lead to death when not detected and treated early.”
Prince Sultan said that the care KSCDR and the Human Rights Commission give to this segment is part of the programs and initiatives sponsored by King Salman since he adopted the cause and presented many programs and projects that economically, socially and intellectually enable persons with disability. This is also based on the importance of scientific research specialized in disability research, and it confirms the King’s vision that disability and its social and economic repercussions constitute one of the most important challenges facing contemporary societies.
He emphasized that King Salman also was the first to support the establishing of the association of the founders of KSCDR and joined it as a member, prompting 110 founding members, including individuals, companies, banks, charities, banks and families to join as well.
Prince Sultan said that it is important that Saudi Arabia becomes the global leader in the rights of persons with disabilities as the cause receives great support from King Salman, who, for more than 35 years, has been advocating for this segment of society.
Al-Aiban expressed his appreciation for Prince Sultan’s efforts in protecting and promoting the rights of persons with disabilities.
He explained that the signing of the MoU is part of the Human Rights Commission’s integrative partnerships to cooperate in various fields related to knowledge enrichment on disability and persons with disabilities, as well as their issues and rights. Its aim is to raise community awareness on the matter, exchange experiences and advice and prepare joint studies and research disability-related areas.
Al-Aiban praised the participation of KSCDR during the meetings of the UN Human Rights Council to review the Kingdom’s report to the Convention — the report that was praised by all members of the committee, who also pointed out that the international community should benefit from the Kingdom’s best practices.
He added: “This center must have international arms and outreach to expand beyond Saudi Arabia and reach regional and international levels in a faster manner, especially with societies unfortunately suffering from wars and crises that result in many disabilities.”


Houthi attack on Saudi Aramco facilities act of terror: Japanese defense minister

Updated 16 September 2019

Houthi attack on Saudi Aramco facilities act of terror: Japanese defense minister

TOKYO: Taro Kono, the defense minister of Japan, said that threats to his country’s oil supply was the “most worrying scenario” he could imagine in international relations, in the wake of attacks on Saudi Arabian oil production facilities. 

“The most pessimistic scenario right now is that something happens in the Straits of Hormuz and the oil supply gets cut down, and that would send a shock wave through the global economy. I think the price of oil is already rising after this attack on Saudi facilities, so that’s the most worrying scenario right now,” he told a conference in Tokyo, Japan.

However, speaking on the sidelines to Arab News, he insisted that Saudi Arabia would remain a reliable partner of Japan - which imports around 40 per cent of its crude from the Kingdom - and downplayed concerns about long-term supply problems.

“Saudi has been and will be an important source of our energy supply. We have international co-ordination, and we have reserves, so we are not really worried about that,” he said. 

Kono, who was until recently Japan’s foreign minister, said that his country would be seeking to promote diplomatic solutions to the latest Middle East conflagration. "We definitely need to ease the tension between those countries. As Foreign Minister, the last thing I was doing was calling the Iranian Foreign Minister and the French Foreign Minister to ease the tension the region through diplomatic actions, and I think it's important to continue doing it.

“This Houthi attack on Saudi is a little different, because it's a terrorist attack. I think we may require some kind of military operation against those drone attacks, and that's something out of Japan's constitutional boundary. I think Japan will be focusing on diplomatic efforts in easing tension in the region.”

He raised concerns about the apparent lack of sophistication in the recent attacks. “If it is really drones, that is a lot cheaper than any form of conventional missile,” he said.