Taif Season perfumery showcases its signature smell 

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The Rose Lab, one of Taif Season’s Ward Village events, gives visitors an opportunity to learn about the importance of roses in perfumery. (SPA)
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The Rose Lab, one of Taif Season’s Ward Village events, gives visitors an opportunity to learn about the importance of roses in perfumery. (SPA)
Updated 01 September 2019

Taif Season perfumery showcases its signature smell 

  • 20-minute Rose Lab crash course shows visitors the basic rules of perfume composition
  • Visitors of the lab have produced more than 6,000 perfumes

TAIF: The Rose Lab, one of Taif Season’s Ward Village events, gave visitors an opportunity to learn about the importance of roses in perfumery.

The Taif rose became the most prominent economic product in the city. The people of Taif introduced the flower to the region, where it flourished in the soil and acquired high economic value.

The lab delivers a training course to introduce visitors to the basic rules of perfume composition in just 20 minutes.

The course concludes with the visitors creating a sample of their fragrance, which they can keep as a gift. Visitors of the lab have produced more than 6,000 perfumes.

Due to the increasing demand for special perfume composition courses, the organizers of the event started an online perfumery training course titled “Our Perfumes from Our Flowers.”

The Rose Lab is one of many events in the Ward Village of the famous Al-Rudaf Park, which are showcasing roses as one of the most important natural products of Taif.

The region is famous for its rich heritage and strategic location on the old incense road, which was traveled by merchants carrying spices and luxury goods from Amman to Taif.

Taif Season, which is one of 11 festivals being held across the Kingdom to promote the country as a global tourist destination, ended on Saturday. It celebrated local culture through scores of activities and events including a rose village, a lively souq and circus shows.

Many accompanying events were held, such as the Rose Marathon, tourist trips and a shopping festival, which contributed to the consolidation of Taif’s status as one of the most important Arab tourist destinations.


Saudi Arabia loses 120,000 hectares of trees every year

Awareness campaigns highlight the importance of trees. (Shutterstock)
Updated 21 February 2020

Saudi Arabia loses 120,000 hectares of trees every year

  • The fine for cutting down a tree can reach SR5,000 ($1,333) while the fine for transporting logs is SR10,000

MAKKAH: Saudi Arabia loses 120,000 hectares of trees every year through destruction and tree logging.
Trees help stop desertification because they are a stabilizer of soil. In the Arabian Peninsula, land threatened by desertification ranges from 70 to 90 percent. A national afforestation campaign was launched in Saudi Arabia last October, and there is a national plan set to run until this April.
The Ministry of Environment, Water and Agriculture said that although natural vegetation across the country had suffered in the past four decades, modern technologies such as satellites and drones could be used to track down individuals or businesses harming the Kingdom’s vegetation.
“Harsh penalties should be imposed on violators such as the seizure or confiscation of transport and hefty fines,” Dr. Abdulrahman Al-Sugair, chairman of the Environmental Green Horizons Society, told Arab News.
These were long-term solutions and they needed coordination with authorities to ensure warehouses and markets did not stock logs or firewood, he said. Another solution was sourcing an alternative product from overseas that was of high quality and at a reasonable price. A third was to provide support to firewood and coal suppliers.
“The general public needs to be more aware of the importance of trees and should have a strong sense of responsibility toward these trees,” Al-Sugair added.
“They should also stop buying firewood in the market. We can also encourage investment in wood production through agricultural holdings as well as implement huge afforestation projects and irrigate them from treated sewage water.”
The fine for cutting down a tree can reach SR5,000 ($1,333) while the fine for transporting logs is SR10,000. These fines could not be implemented as they should be because there were no available staff to monitor and catch violators and, to make matters worse said Al-Sugair, there was a weak level of coordination between authorities.
Most of the Kingdom’s regions have suffered in some way from tree felling, and some places no longer have trees. These violations are rampant in the south and Madinah regions, as well as in Hail and Al-Nafud Desert.
Riyadh is the most active and the largest market for firewood. Many people in Al-Qassim use firewood as do restaurants in some parts of Saudi Arabia.
Omar Al-Nefaee, a microbiology professor at the Ministry of Education in Taif, said the reason behind the widescale destruction of the environment could be attributed to a supply shortage of imported firewood.
“Tree logging causes an environmental disequilibrium,” he told Arab News. “The Ministry of Environment, Agriculture and Water has launched an initiative raising public awareness on the issue and is asking people not to use local firewood. Several awareness campaigns have been launched for the same purpose to educate people about the importance of using imported wood instead of the local wood in order to protect the Kingdom’s vegetation.”
Official reports warn that the Kingdom has lost 80 percent of its vegetation and that the drop will have a detrimental effect on its biodiversity, as well as causing great damage to the environment.
The general public should use other heating options during the winter and stop using firewood, Al-Nefaee said.
Some local studies have called for farms that can produce wood from plants that do not consume too much water and do not affect vegetation, while at the same time reducing the pressure on other regions in the Kingdom that are rich in animal resources.
Falih Aljuhani, who runs a business that imports wood from Georgia, encouraged Saudi firms to import wood from the Balkans because it was a competitive market and the trees had low carbon percentages.