Interbellum Lebanese lead Karl Mattar to release new video for his song ‘Ready to Dissolve’

The video clip was shot by Lebanese filmmaker Camille Cabbabé. (Supplied)
Updated 10 September 2019
0

Interbellum Lebanese lead Karl Mattar to release new video for his song ‘Ready to Dissolve’

DUBAI: Beirut-based indie act Interbellum will release a new video next week for “Ready to Dissolve,” a track from the 2018 album “Dead Pets, Old Griefs.”

Interbellum began as a full-fledged band, but is now essentially singer-songwriter Karl Mattar with various collaborators, including — on this track — Julia Sabra, the frontperson of Mattar’s Ruptured label mates Postcards.

Like much of “Dead Pets, Old Griefs,” the dreamy, pop-y instrumental side of the track lays the ground for some introspective, sometimes sinister lyrics (“Everything tastes like ashes/The very sky could crash”).




Interbellum began as a full-fledged band. (Supplied)

The video was shot by Lebanese filmmaker Camille Cabbabé, and is set in the ruins of Beirut’s Grand Theater, situated on the Green Line during the Lebanese Civil War. Mattar and Lynn Sheikh Moussa can be seen flitting among the ruins. “There’s an emptiness and an eeriness permeating everything,” Mattar said in a press release. “Nature slowly taking over and poking through the cracks.”

As the title suggests, much of “Dead Pets, Old Griefs” is about loss. But Mattar told Arab News that he doesn’t feel the record is necessarily pessimistic, and that he thinks of it as “lighter” than Interbellum’s more musically upbeat debut album, “Now Try Coughing.”

“It’s definitely dark, but I feel there’s also a lot of tenderness and empathy. And a definite pull towards the light, even if it’s somehow in vain,” Mattar said of “Dead Pets, Old Griefs.” “The first album feels more aimless and angry.”




Mattar said that much of “Dead Pets, Old Griefs” is about loss. (Courtesy: Interbellum)

He added that while the debut LP was “looking outwards and trying to make sense of the mess of things,” this one “is about memory and looking for the truth in its folds, and trying to both retrieve and escape it.”

“The album became about the process of remembering itself,” he explained. “It is hopeless — in that the past is irretrievable and irreconcilable and is distorted by emotion and deformed by each revisitation — but I feel there’s still light and warmth seeping through everything, maybe from the comfort of nostalgia or the purity of childhood.”

Mattar stressed that “Ready to Dissolve” and the album in general are “a real attempt to communicate, to connect, with myself, with others, with the listener.” And while the lyrics may occasionally be bleak, he said he hoped that the record’s creative energy “prevails over that hopelessness and acts as a sort of balm to the whole experience.”


Celine Dion returns to Canada to kick off world tour

Updated 19 September 2019

Celine Dion returns to Canada to kick off world tour

  • The Grammy winner also recently announced the release of a new album titled “Courage”
  • She said in April that she felt motivated to create new music and hit the road after the 2016 death of her husband and manager

QUEBEC CITY: After living and crooning for years in Las Vegas, French-Canadian superstar Celine Dion returned home to Quebec to kick off her first world tour in a decade on Wednesday.
At 51, the Grammy winner also recently announced the release of a new album titled “Courage,” which will be her 12th in English and is due out on November 15.
The first single “Flying On My Own,” featuring her powerful vocals backed by techno beats, has already hit the airwaves, while three more dropped Wednesday: “Courage,” “Lying Down” and “Imperfections.”
Known for her blockbuster ballads, Dion said in April that she felt motivated to create new music and hit the road after the 2016 death of her husband and manager Rene Angelil.
“When I lost Rene, he wanted me back on stage. He wanted to make sure I was still practicing my passion,” she said. “I wanted to prove to him that I’m fine, we’re fine, we’re going to be OK. I’ve got this.”
So, after more than 1,140 concerts for 4.5 million fans over 16 years in Sin City, she bid adieu to the Colosseum at Caesars Palace with a final two-hour show.
“Courage is exactly the way I feel,” she told public broadcaster CBC at the time, talking up the upcoming tour of the same name.
“In the past three years, it has been difficult for me to talk to my children, to raise them, to lose my husband, wondering am I going to sing again... so much has happened, but at the same time I feel that I’m in control of my life.”
Some 60 dates in North American have been confirmed so far, her label said, with two arena shows in Quebec City on Wednesday and Saturday kicking off the tour, which will run through April 2020, and will be her first world tour since 2008-2009.
Her show was almost two hours of mastery, as she performed some of her greatest hits — from “I’m Alive” to “My Heart Will Go On” — as well as new material to an ecstatic crowd of roughly 20,000.
“It was really impossible to miss Celine at home,” Nicolas Delivre, a French university exchange student in Montreal, told AFP.
Donald Berard, from Quebec City, said he had grown up listening to Dion. “We love her like a member of our family.”
“Courage” marks the first album and tour in Dion’s long career without Angelil, who steered her success beginning in 1981 when he mortgaged his house to finance the young teen’s debut album.
The pair began a personal relationship in 1988 when she was only 19 years old, and married in a lavish ceremony in 1994. Angelil died of throat cancer at age 73.
In an interview with NBC’s Today show, Dion revealed that she longs for the hugs and laughs that come with a relationship, but added, “I’m not ready to date.”
The youngest of a family of 14 children raised in the suburbs of Montreal, Dion has sold 250 million copies of 23 studio albums in English and French, including collaborations with French singer-songwriter Jean-Jacques Goldman, Barbra Streisand and Stevie Wonder.
Back in Canada, she told the Montreal Gazette that the tour schedule was “a little crazy,” but that she had found time in advance to take in life’s small pleasures.
At a press junket last Friday, Dion told Radio-Canada: “There are good wines that age well, and there are good wines that age badly. I hope to be a good bottle of wine.”
“I’m not a new Celine,” Dion added. “I’m a continuity of myself.”