Film Review: ‘Shadow of Water,’ a trek through the jungle with a predictable ending

The film was screened at the Venice Film Festival. (Supplied)
Updated 10 September 2019

Film Review: ‘Shadow of Water,’ a trek through the jungle with a predictable ending

VENICE: The latest outing of Sanal Kumar Sasidharan, the Indian director who makes movies in his native Malayalam (the language spoken in Kerala), Shadow of Water (Chola) appeared in the second most important category, Horizons, at the Venice Film Festival. One of his very early creations, An Off-Day Game, was remarkable for the manner in which it tore apart caste divisions and the biases associated with them. Its climax was shocking and completely unpredictable. His next work, S Durga, ran into censor problems because of its original name, Sexy Durga. It was a story of a young couple who are eloping in the middle of the night, and the uneasy experiences they have. Sasidharan conveyed fear without actually resorting to any violence, truly Hitchcockian!

But Shadow of Water is several notches below S Durga and An Off-Day Game. To begin with, the director appears to be on a familiar, beaten track – of a young couple and their nightmarish night in the jungles of Kerala. Janaki (Nimisha Sajayan) looks like a schoolgirl, but she is in love with a wimpy boy (unnamed, played by Akhil Viswanath), and decides to take a trip to the city, chaperoned (nobody knows why) by his boss, a burly guy who is called Aasan or Master (Joju George). Janaki is clearly nervous, perhaps having bunked classes and coming away on the sly. Her lover hardly seems confident of handling his girl, who is upset in the first place that he has brought along his boss. And it all goes horribly wrong.

Shadow of Water throws up more questions than it cares to answer. What was the Master’s interest in taking the young couple on a trip in his vehicle? Did he have an ulterior motive? And after a traumatic experience in a city hotel room, Janaki’s behavior appears bewildering. One critic called it the Stockholm Syndrome. But can anyone develop it in a matter of few hours? Surely it takes days.

It is a weak plot and not scripted with enough care. If Sajayan goes overboard with her hysterics, the men are uni-dimensional, almost caricaturist. The movie, at two hours long, seems stretched with long scenes in the vehicle and the forests that ultimately lead to a tragedy we all knew was coming. Honestly, it is time Sasidharan moved on from his stories of fear and angst.


Indonesia taps into Muslim tourist market with Shariah hotels

Indonesia has been named as the number one destination, out of 130 countries, for halal tourism in the world by the Global Muslim Travel Index 2019. (Shutterstock)
Updated 18 November 2019

Indonesia taps into Muslim tourist market with Shariah hotels

  • Indonesia made top destination for halal tourism in the world in latest report

JAKARTA: With a rising awareness to promote Muslim-friendly travel, the widespread adoption of Shariah-based accommodation is not always successfully put into practice, as Octine Riyantini realized during one of her stays at a hotel that claimed to be Shariah-compliant.

Riyantini has stayed in two Shariah-based hotels in Indonesia and had a good experience with the first one, where she found that hotel staff always greeted guests with the Islamic greeting, had call of prayers blasted from a speaker and provided prayer amenities as well as a Qibla sign in each room. 

“The ambiance was very much Islamic and the hotel itself was clean and well-maintained,” she told Arab News.

She had a different experience with the second one, despite the Shariah label that goes with the hotel’s name in an online hotel reservation website. 

The hotel has call of prayers blasted from a speaker and provided prayer amenities as well as a Qibla sign in each room. (Courtesy: Sofyan Hotel)

Although they provided a prayer room on each floor, Riyantini said it seemed like it was hastily prepared and a bit spooky, so she and her family chose to pray in their room. Moreover, the hotel was not properly maintained. 

“Maybe they consider their hotel to be Shariah-compliant just because they provide a prayer room on each floor and a Qibla sign in the room, yet the overall ambiance hardly felt like it was Muslim-friendly,” she said. 

“I learned that not all hotels that claimed to be Shariah-based are really compliant to the value. If we have to stay in such a hotel another time, we will have to consider which hotel chain it is associated with,” she said. 

Muslim-friendly travel and tourism in Indonesia continues to rise, with Indonesia named as the number one destination, out of 130 countries, for halal tourism in the world by the Global Muslim Travel Index 2019. 

Service providers have been quick to tap into the growing market, despite the controversy and misconceptions about halal tourism in the world’s largest Muslim-majority country. 

The ambiance at the hotel is very much Islamic. (Courtesy: Sofyan Hotel)

According to a survey conducted by accommodation network operator Airy, 60 percent of Indonesian travelers think that it is important to have Shariah-based accommodation. The figure was consistent with data from the Alvara Research Center, which showed that 64 percent of Indonesian millennials travel and go on holiday at least once a year, providing a market of about 26 million holiday-hunting Muslim millennials. 

Responding to the market demand, Airy in 2016 began offering a segment called Airy Syariah or a Shariah-based accommodation network. 

“Our Airy Syariah properties offer Muslim-friendly accommodation so that guests can stay comfortably and worry-free. The market response has been good and demand for Shariah-based accommodation continues to rise every year. Our occupancy rate so far stands at 40 percent to 70 percent,” Airy vice president for marketing, Ika Paramita, told Arab News. 

The hotel provides a prayer room on each floor. (Courtesy: Sofyan Hotel)

Paramita said Airy cooperates with more than 400 Muslim-friendly properties in some 50 cities across Indonesia and it has been growing at a triple-digit rate year-on-year.

“The food and drinks in our properties are halal-certified, and we provide Muslim-friendly amenities. Guests can immediately experience their stay in our Shariah-based properties, where hotel staff uniforms and attitudes conform to Islamic values. Moreover, we validate the marriage status when a couple is checking in,” Paramita said. 

The food and drinks in the hotel are halal-certified. (Courtesy: Sofyan Hotel)

Shariah-compliant accommodation is not new in Indonesia. The Sofyan Hotel chain in Jakarta has implemented the concept in its two properties since 1992 by removing nightclubs, bars and alcoholic drinks from its facilities. 

But the concept does not always appeal to all Muslims in Indonesia. University lecturer Ratna Djumala said she prefers to stay in a conventional hotel to show her children about meeting people of various backgrounds. 

“I want to show my children about diversity and tolerance, especially this coming December when hotels are adorned with Christmas decorations. I want my kids to experience the ambiance, too. A family-friendly hotel doesn’t always have to be a Shariah-based one. What’s important for me is the food has to be halal,” she told Arab News. 

Muslim-friendly travel was valued at $189 billion in 2018 and is estimated to reach $274 billion by 2024, according to the State of Global Islamic Economy Report 2019.