Saudi Arabia’s Princess Lamia opens new and improved Islamic art space at Louvre in Paris

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Princess Lamia expressed hope that the newly expanded spaces would play a role in strengthening understanding of the rich artistic culture of Islamic history. (Alwaleed Philanthropies)
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Visitors to the exhibition will be shown the evolution of Islamic art and how it influenced and, in turn, was influenced by other artistic traditions. (Arab News)
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Visitors to the exhibition will be shown the evolution of Islamic art and how it influenced and, in turn, was influenced by other artistic traditions. (Arab News)
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Visitors to the exhibition will be shown the evolution of Islamic art and how it influenced and, in turn, was influenced by other artistic traditions. (Arab News)
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Visitors to the exhibition will be shown the evolution of Islamic art and how it influenced and, in turn, was influenced by other artistic traditions. (Arab News)
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Visitors to the exhibition will be shown the evolution of Islamic art and how it influenced and, in turn, was influenced by other artistic traditions. (Arab News)
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Visitors to the exhibition will be shown the evolution of Islamic art and how it influenced and, in turn, was influenced by other artistic traditions. (Arab News)
Updated 12 September 2019

Saudi Arabia’s Princess Lamia opens new and improved Islamic art space at Louvre in Paris

  • Exhibition contains 3,000 pieces dating from the 7th to the 19th centuries
  • Expansion part of ongoing partnership between Louvre and Alwaleed Philanthropies

PARIS: A new space at the Louvre Museum in Paris showcasing more than 12 centuries of Islamic art was unveiled on Tuesday by Princess Lamia bint Majed Al-Saud, the secretary general of Alwaleed Philanthropies.

Boasting one of the most extensive collections of Muslim art and artifacts in the world, the new department contains 3,000 items collected from Spain to India via the Arabian peninsula and dating from the 7th century to the 19th.

Visitors to the exhibition will be shown the evolution of Islamic art and how it influenced and, in turn, was influenced by other artistic traditions.

The expansion over two floors was supported by Alwaleed Philanthropies, which has a longstanding partnership with the Paris museum dating back nearly 20 years. The global foundation chaired by Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal donated $23 million in 2005 to help build the museum’s department of Islamic art.

Princess Lamia expressed hope that the newly expanded spaces would play a role in strengthening understanding of the rich artistic culture of Islamic history.

Speaking at the event, she said: “The new and expanded spaces allow visitors to enjoy world-class Islamic art and appreciate the shared human values expressed in its creativity. Importantly, this space has also been designed to be inclusive of everyone.”

Jean-Luc Martinez, Louvre president, thanked  Alwaleed Philanthropies “for its commitment in favor of the Islamic Arts Department.”

“Thanks to this redesign, we hope to reach even more visitors, and provide them the keys to understanding the wonderful artistic heritage with which we have been entrusted,” he added.


38k people register with Saudi national distance learning platform in 10 days

Updated 31 March 2020

38k people register with Saudi national distance learning platform in 10 days

  • The quality of the programs had contributed to increasing the number of enrollees, says director

JEDDAH: The number of people who registered with the Saudi e-training platform (Doroob) between March 16 and 26, across 365 various programs, has reached 38,000.

The director for the development of training programs at the Human Resources Development Fund (HADAF) and supervisor of Doroob, Mohammed Al-Shuwaier, said the training programs had been designed to promote distance learning and provide needed experience in all fields and specializations required by the labor market, in line with the governmental precautionary and preventive measures to fight the coronavirus disease (COVID-19).

Al-Shuwaier noted that the quality of the programs had contributed to increasing the number of enrollees, with more than 3,500 people befitting from the interactive training sessions broadcast last week on Doroob.

Nahla Abul-ula, an HR expert, said companies in Saudi Arabia had been encouraging employees to benefit from online training opportunities for a long time through state-supported platforms like Doroob or through independent educational platforms.

“However, the global coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has made people more accepting of such modern means in order to keep pace with the accelerating life events,” the HR business partner at IKEA said.

“We will definitely see an increasing reliance on e-learning options in the coming period if the crisis continues,” she said.

E-learning is an individual effort, where learners seek to obtain information by themselves and employ the acquired skills to develop their abilities and experiences. Abul-ula considers virtual learning no less effective than classroom learning.

She said that employees and job seekers’ focus on development in this critical time will not only allow them to grow and take advantage of free time in their schedule but “will also give them better opportunities after the crisis is over.”

Doroob was launched by HADAF as part of the training and qualification programs aimed at developing the skills of students, job seekers and those wishing to be promoted in their jobs, to increase participation in the private sector and help job seekers find suitable opportunities. 

Doroob is an integrated program that provides e-training programs and certification upon completion of requirements.

To register for the e-training courses, interested people can log on to doroob.sa.