600,000 Rohingya still in Myanmar at ‘serious risk of genocide’: UN

Rohingya refugees gather behind a barbed-wire fence in a temporary settlement setup in a ‘no man’s land’ border zone between Myanmar and Bangladesh on April 25, 2018. (AFP file photo)
Updated 16 September 2019

600,000 Rohingya still in Myanmar at ‘serious risk of genocide’: UN

  • Some 740,000 Rohingya fled burning villages, bringing accounts of murder, rape and torture from Myanmar
  • UN team says the 600,000 Rohingya still inside Myanmar’s Rakhine state

YANGON: Rohingya Muslims remaining in Myanmar still face a “serious risk of genocide,” UN investigators said Monday, warning the repatriation of a million already driven from the country by the army remains “impossible.”
The fact-finding mission to Myanmar, set up by the Human Rights Council, last year branded the army operations in 2017 as “genocide” and called for the prosecution of top generals, including army chief Min Aung Hlaing.
Some 740,000 Rohingya fled burning villages, bringing accounts of murder, rape and torture over the border to sprawling refugee camps in Bangladesh, where survivors of previous waves of persecution already languish.
But in a damning report, the UN team said the 600,000 Rohingya still inside Myanmar’s Rakhine state remain in deteriorating and “deplorable” conditions.
“Myanmar continues to harbor genocidal intent and the Rohingya remain under serious risk of genocide,” the investigators said in their final report on Myanmar, due to be presented Tuesday in Geneva.
The country is “denying wrongdoing, destroying evidence, refusing to conduct effective investigations and clearing, razing, confiscating and building on land from which it displaced Rohingya,” it said.
Myanmar military spokesman Zaw Min Tun rejected the team’s findings, calling them “one-sided.”
“Instead of making biased accusations, they should go onto the ground to see the reality,” Zaw Min Tun said.


Climate-change protesters disrupt London rail services

Updated 17 October 2019

Climate-change protesters disrupt London rail services

  • The videos show commuters dragging activists off the tops of trains

LONDON: Climate change activists disrupted rail services in the east of London on Thursday, with pictures on social media showing protesters sat on trains during the morning commute.
British Transport Police said they had responded to incidents at Shadwell, Stratford and Canning Town, near to London’s Canary Wharf financial district.
“Arrests have already been made and officers are working to quickly resume services,” the police said in a statement.