Yemen’s ambassador to Egypt accused of ‘stealing’ top students’ scholarships ‘for friends’ 

Activists and journalists have previously accused Ambassador Mohamed Marem of involvement in corruption during his post in Egypt. (Screen grab)
Updated 27 September 2019

Yemen’s ambassador to Egypt accused of ‘stealing’ top students’ scholarships ‘for friends’ 

  • Fatima Hajar, who received a 99.7 percent average grade, discovered her scholarship to study medicine was given away
  • Ambassador Mohamed Marem was accused of corruption and “stealing” government scholarships to give to “his friends'” children

Yemen’s ambassador in Egypt, Mohamed Marem, was accused of corruption and “stealing” government scholarships of Yemeni students to give to “his friends’” children, Yemeni media reported.

Fatima Hajar, who received a 99.7 percent average grade from school, arrived in Cairo after receiving a government scholarship to study medicine in Egypt, but found out that Marem had given her place to the daughter of one of his diplomatic friends, activists reported.

Four similar cases of students who had their government scholarships stolen were also reported, the activists added.

The corruption scandal caused an outcry among the Yemeni community and lead to an official announcement from the Yemeni government that the allegations would be investigated.

Prime Minister Maeen Abdulmalik Saeed also instructed the ministers of Higher Education and Foreign Affairs to complete the admission procedures of the students who have had their scholarships taken.

The prime minister also directed the two ministries to promptly open an investigation within the embassy in Cairo.

The official statement from the government confirmed that the Yemeni embassy in Cairo had taken five scholarships from top students and awarded them to other students who were close to embassy staff.

The Ministry of Higher Education has denounced the embassy in Egypt for giving the students scholarships - awarded by the ministry - to other students, and outside the ministry’s approval.

The ministry noted that it would not hesitate to take any appropriate legal action in cases of violation to preserve the interests of students.

Activists and journalists have previously accused Marem of involvement in corruption during his post in Egypt.


Sudan raises bread price, year after Bashir’s fall

Updated 53 min 47 sec ago

Sudan raises bread price, year after Bashir’s fall

  • One Sudanese pound buys only a 50 gram loaf of bread, compared to 70 grams previously
  • A tripling of the price of bread had been the trigger for street protests against President Omar Al-Bashir in December 2018

KHARTOUM: Sudanese authorities on Wednesday announced a rise in the price of bread in the capital Khartoum, nearly a year after the fall of President Omar Al-Bashir.
A tripling of the price of bread had been the trigger for street protests against Bashir in December 2018 — demonstrations that went on for months until the army deposed the longtime ruler on April 11 last year.
Wednesday’s change will mean that one Sudanese pound buys only a 50 gram loaf of bread, compared to 70 grams previously, according to Khartoum state governor Ahmed Abdoun.
In mid-December 2018, the price of bread had been hiked from one pound for a 70 gram loaf to three Sudanese pounds in parts of the country, triggering the social unrest that turned into mass anti-Bashir demonstrations.