Supertanker sanctions send global oil freight rates soaring

Rates for chartering Very Large Crude Carriers surged overnight after the US announcement. (Shutterstock)
Updated 28 September 2019

Supertanker sanctions send global oil freight rates soaring

  • US move to exert maximum pressure on Iran to drop its nuclear program unsettles crude trade

SINGAPORE: Key oil freight rates from the Middle East to Asia rocketed as much as 28 percent on Friday in a global oil shipping market spooked by US sanctions on units of Chinese giant COSCO for alleged involvement in ferrying crude out of Iran.

In what the State Department called “one of the largest sanctions actions the US has taken” since curbs were re-imposed on Iran in November last year, two units of COSCO were named alongside other companies in claims of involvement in sanctions-busting shipments of Iranian oil. 

The surprise move, affecting one of the world’s largest energy shippers, operating more than 50 supertankers, comes as President Donald Trump seeks to exert maximum pressure on Iran to drop nuclear programs.

As some Asian oil buyers rushed to the shipping market to secure vessels, rates for chartering supertankers, or Very Large
Crude Carriers (VLCCs), to load crude oil from the Middle East to north Asia in October surged nearly 19 percent overnight to about 75-76 points on Worldscale, an industry tool used to calculate freight charges, shipping and industry sources said.

That means an increase of about $600,000 for each ship, a Singapore-based crude oil trader said.

The rates for loading Middle East crude to west coast India in the second week of October jumped 28 percent to 80-92.5 points after Reliance Industries Ltd. booked two supertankers overnight, industry sources said.

But there was also uncertainty over how widely the sanctions on the COSCO units — COSCO Shipping Tanker (Dalian) Co, Ltd. and its subsidiary COSCO Shipping Tanker (Dalian) Seaman & Ship Management — will be implemented. Industry sources said some oil buyers were holding off hiring COSCO tankers while they check with legal teams to better understand the impact of the sanctions.

“The market is fearful of sanctions so refiners are taking some preventive measures. We’ll have to see how widely implemented the sanctions will be,” said KY Lin, spokesman for Taiwanese refiner Formosa Petrochemical, a major crude oil buyer in Asia.

Friday’s jolt left shipping rates springing back to levels not seen since mid-September drone and missile strikes on key Saudi Arabian oil production facilities roiled global markets. The COSCO vessels are equal to about 7.5 percent of the world’s fleet of supertankers, according to Refinitiv data.

“Charterers are in trouble,” a North Asian shipbroker said, declining to be named citing company policy. “It was terrible news for every one of us with the Saudi drone attack, and now the market has to deal with US sanctions on COSCO.”

“Good news for owners, good time for them to earn money,” the broker said.

While diplomatic tensions between the US and Iran remain high, a British-flagged tanker that had been detained by Iran in the Strait of Hormuz on Friday left Bandar Abbas port heading for international waters.

On Thursday, Unipec, the trading arm of Asia’s largest refiner Sinopec and India’s largest refiner Indian Oil Corp, canceled bookings of some COSCO ships and scrambled to find alternative ships to move their crude on. 

“Rates have definitely been pushed higher by these sanctions,” said an executive at a top shipbroker in Singapore, adding that ships carrying Middle East and US crude to Asia were subject to the biggest impact. The broker declined to be identified, citing company policy.

Crude shipments from the US to Asia have also been affected. Industry sources said provisional bookings for VLCCs Cosmerry Lake and Yuan Qiu Hu to load US oil in the second half of October had been scrapped. Cosmerry Lake is owned by Cosmerry Lake Maritime Inc. and managed by Cosco Shipping Tanker (Dalian), while Yuan Qiu Hu is owned and managed by Cosco Shipping Tanker (Dalian).

COSCO officials were tight-lipped on Friday.

“(The) company is assessing the situation and impact internally
as soon as possible, but so far we don’t have anything to update you,” said Zhang Zheng, an investor relations official with COSCO Shipping Energy Transportation, parent of COSCO Shipping Tanker (Dalian).


Oil-rich wealth funds seen shedding up to $225 billion in stocks

Updated 30 March 2020

Oil-rich wealth funds seen shedding up to $225 billion in stocks

  • Risking more losses is not an option for some funds from oil-producing nations

LONDON: Sovereign wealth funds from oil-producing countries mainly in the Middle East and Africa are on course to dump up to $225 billion in equities, a senior banker estimates, as plummeting oil prices and the coronavirus pandemic hit state finances.

The rapid spread of the virus has ravaged the global economy, sending markets into a tailspin and costing both oil and non-oil based sovereign wealth funds around $1 trillion in equity losses, according to JPMorgan strategist Nikolaos Panigirtzoglou.

His estimates are based on data from sovereign wealth funds and figures from the Sovereign Wealth Fund Institute, a research group.

Sticking with equity investments and risking more losses is not an option for some funds from oil-producing nations. Their governments are facing a financial double-whammy — falling revenues due to the spiraling oil price and rocketing spending as administrations rush out emergency budgets.

Around $100-$150 billion in stocks have likely been offloaded by oil-producer sovereign wealth funds, excluding Norway’s fund, in recent weeks, Panigirtzoglou said, and a further $50-$75 billion will likely be sold in the coming months.

“It makes sense for sovereign funds to frontload their selling, as you don’t want to be selling your assets at a later stage when it is more likely to have distressed valuations,” he said.

Most oil-based funds are required to keep substantial cash-buffers in place in case a collapse in oil prices triggers a request from the government for funding.

A source at an oil-based sovereign fund said it had been gradually raising its liquidity position since oil prices began drifting lower from their most recent peak above $70 a barrel in October 2018.

In addition to the cash reserves, additional liquidity was typically drawn firstly from short-term money market instruments like treasury bills and then from passively invested equity as a last resort, the source said.

It’s generally a similar trend for other funds.

“Our investor flows broadly show more resilience than market pricing would suggest,” said Elliot Hentov, head of policy research at State Street Global Advisers. “There has been a shift toward cash since the crisis started, but it’s not a panic move but rather gradual.”

The sovereign fund source said the fund had made adjustments to its actively managed equity investments due to the market rout, both to stem losses and position for the recovery, when it comes.

Exactly how much sovereign wealth funds invest and with whom remain undisclosed. Many don’t even report the value of the assets they manage.

On Thursday, the Norwegian sovereign wealth fund said it had lost $124 billion so far this year as equity markets sunk but its outgoing CEO Yngve Slyngstad said it would, at some point, start buying stocks to get its portfolio back to its target equity allocation of 70 percent from 65 percent currently.

Slyngstad also said that any fiscal spending by the government this year would be financed by selling bonds in its portfolio.