‘Incredibly rare’ monkey born at Australian zoo

A newly-born male Francois’ Langur, one of the world’s rarest monkeys, stays close to his mother at the Taronga Zoo in Sydney. (Taronga Zoo/AFP)
Updated 04 October 2019

‘Incredibly rare’ monkey born at Australian zoo

  • The male Francois’ Langur with its distinctive orange fur was born at Sydney’s Taronga zoo last week
  • Critically-endangered, the animal is only found in China and Vietnam where it is threatened by poachers

SYDNEY: One of the world’s rarest monkeys has been born at an Australian zoo.
The male Francois’ Langur with its distinctive orange fur was born at Sydney’s Taronga zoo last week and has not yet been named.
Critically-endangered, the animal is only found in China and Vietnam where it is threatened by poachers and loss of habitat from encroaching development.
“Seeing Francois’ Langurs in the wild is incredibly rare, but seeing a baby is even more so,” said Senior Zoo Keeper Jane Marshall.
The baby’s bright orange hair lasts just a few weeks before it begins to darken to the color of its mother Noel’s hair.
The zoo estimates there are only about 3,000 of the species left in the wild.
“Not a lot of people know about Francois’ Langurs as a species, but these beautiful animals are very vibrant animals, who are incredibly agile and intelligent,” Marshall added.


Mountain lovers wed above clouds in Iraq

The made-for-each-other couple. (AFP)
Updated 3 min 34 sec ago

Mountain lovers wed above clouds in Iraq

  • The wedding guests donned hiking boots, thick jackets and sunglasses, happy to escape the sweltering heat in the plains below where summer temperatures have topped 50 degrees celsius

HALGURD MOUNTAIN: Avid mountaineers Salar and Soma met while trekking in Iraqi Kurdistan, so it was only natural they would get married amid its majestic peaks, some 2,000 meters above sea level.
After a ceremony above the clouds, they spent their wedding night in a tent then embarked on a honeymoon ascent of Mount Halgurd, Iraq’s second-highest mountain at 3,607 meters.
Salar Chomany, 34, has traversed the remote region’s dramatic ridges and valleys for 12 years and turned his passion into his profession, working as a guide for energy companies exploring the region near the Iranian border. Soma Muhammed, 28, a student of Educational Sciences in the mountain town of Koysinjaq, is also an avid trekker.
The wedding guests donned hiking boots, thick jackets and sunglasses, happy to escape the sweltering heat in the plains below where summer temperatures have topped 50 degrees celsius.
At the joyous ceremony, guests braved the thin and chilly air to dance in circles around the bride and groom in a traditional Kurdish “dabkeh” dance.
The newlyweds finally fell asleep in their tent after a feast of fresh fruit and cheese from the village below.
The next morning they strapped on their backpacks and headed up toward the snow-covered summit, for the first time enjoying their shared passion for the mountains as husband and wife.