Abu Dhabi launches first graduate level research-based AI university internationally

The announcement was made at Masdar City, a planned city project in Abu Dhabi. (File/AFP)
Updated 17 October 2019

Abu Dhabi launches first graduate level research-based AI university internationally

  • Registration will open in August 2020
  • PwC expects AI to contribute $16 trillion to the global economy by 2030

DUBAI: Abu Dhabi announced on Wednesday the founding of the first graduate level research-based Artificial Intelligence (AI) university in the world.

The establishment, named after the Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi Mohammed bin Zayed, will provide access to international AI systems for students and faculty.

“AI is already changing the world, but we can achieve so much more if we allow the limitless imagination of the human mind to fully explore it,” UAE Minister of State and chairman of the MBZUAI Board of Trustees Sultan Al-Jaber said.

PricewaterhouseCoopers reported that by 2030 AI is expected to contribute $16 trillion to the global economy and 14 percent to the UAE’s GDP.

MBZUAI will offer Master of Science (MSc) and PhD level programs in a number of areas, such as Machine Learning, Computer Vision and Natural Language Processing.

The university will provide all students with full scholarships and benefits, including a monthly allowance, health insurance and accommodation. It will also help students secure internships with local and global leading companies.

Registration opens in August 2020.


Kuwait expects nearly 1.5 million expats to leave by end of year

Updated 11 July 2020

Kuwait expects nearly 1.5 million expats to leave by end of year

  • Over 158,000 expat workers have already left the country
  • The Egyptian and Indian expats communities were hit the hardest

DUBAI: Almost 1.5 million expatriate workers are expected to leave Kuwait by year’s end as economic slowdown due to the coronavirus pandemic forced companies to cut their workforce to save on costs and remain afloat.
Likewise, the government’s decision to lower the number of expats living in the country, through a new residency law, and its continuing Kuwaitization of jobs in the public sector also hit migrant workers.
Over 158,000 expat workers have already left the country only in a span of 116 days, or from March 16 until July 9, many of whom have been laid off because of the coronavirus crisis, local newspaper Arab Times reported.
The Egyptian and Indian expats communities were hit the hardest, the report said.
The draft of Kuwait’s new residency law would limit the number of foreign nationals recruited by companies each year and will include regulations based on their skills, Interior Minister Anas Al-Saleh was earlier reported as saying.
The Kuwait parliament aims to have the legislation ready by October, prior to the November elections.