What We Are Reading Today: The First Cell

Updated 28 October 2019

What We Are Reading Today: The First Cell

Author: Azra Raza

The First Cell is a world-class oncologist’s devastating and deeply personal examination of cancer.
In The First Cell, Azra Raza, an oncologist at Columbia University, “offers a searing account of how both medicine and our society (mis)treats cancer, how we can do better, and why we must,” said a review in goodreads.com.
“A lyrical journey from hope to despair and back again, The First Cell explores cancer from every angle: Medical, scientific, cultural, and personal,” said the review.
“Raza describes how she bore the terrible burden of being her own husband’s oncologist as he succumbed to leukemia,” it added.
Cancer has impacted everyone on this planet in some way, and this book “offers hope while also reflecting how medicine needs to reevaluate how it tackles this disease. Through this book, it is clear that the author deeply cares about her patients,” said the review.
Raza quotes research that in the US, over 14 years, “42.4 percent of the 9.5 million cancer cases had lost all of their life savings within two-plus years.”

 


What We Are Reading Today: The Politics of Pain

Updated 11 November 2019

What We Are Reading Today: The Politics of Pain

Author: Fintan O’Toole

This is a book about the UK exiting from Brexit. “England’s recent lurch to the right appears to be but one example of the nationalist wave sweeping across the world, yet as acclaimed Irish critic Fintan O’Toole suggests in The Politics of Pain, it is, in reality, a phenomenon rooted in the second World War,” said a review in goodreads.com.
“After the war the UK did not end up as good as they wanted to be. So they were in the European Nation but in 2016 they decided to leave it. They were seeking a new national destiny to shape a new political life and England wanted to be reborn in a new unity that was not with Europe. However, the author does not think their plan went exactly the way they wanted it go,” said the review.
O’Toole is a columnist, assistant editor and drama critic for The Irish Times.
He is a literary critic, historical writer and political commentator, with generally left-wing views. He was and continues to be a strong critic of corruption in Irish politics.