Misk Art paints a happy future for Saudi artists

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AN photo by Sarah Al-Suhaimai
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AN photo by Sarah Al-Suhaimai
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This year, the event focused on creating art for people of all ages. (Supplied)
Updated 04 November 2019

Misk Art paints a happy future for Saudi artists

  • The art week is organized by the Misk Art Institute to support talent and encourage the local art market

RIYADH: The third annual Misk Art Week ended on Saturday with visitors describing the event as a highlight of Saudi Arabia’s burgeoning art calendar.
Art galleries in the Saudi capital opened their doors to more than 120 artists from around the world who showcased their work at a series of exhibitions, symposiums and workshops.
Alanoud, a 26-year-old Saudi visitor, said: “I really enjoyed the artworks, especially the ones about our Saudi culture. I was studying abroad and came back to my homeland.
“I am fascinated that art galleries are popular in my home city.” The art week is organized by the Misk Art Institute to support talent and encourage the local art market. Artists’ professional development and education is promoted through interactive discussions, as well as exchanging skills and direct learning.
Misk Art Week this year focused on experimenting and creating art for all ages, with 180 workshops in four halls, each looking at a specific kind of art. “Contrast in Harmony Exhibition” was among the pavilions taking part.
“The name of the exhibition is in line with the title of Misk Art Week, which is experimenting,’’ said Lulwa Al-Homoud, the exhibition coordinator.
Fine artist and educational consultant Maisa Shaldan’s visual expressions imagined the different experiences a person goes through in life, using the color blue to denote happiness and screws to reflect bad experiences.

FASTFACTS

• Art galleries in Riyadh opened their doors to more than 120 artists from around the world who showcased their work at a series of exhibitions, symposiums and workshops.

• Misk Art Institute aims to support talent and encourage the local art market. Artists’ professional development and education is promoted through interactive discussions, as well as exchanging skills and direct learning.

• This year, Misk Art Week focused on experimenting and creating art for all ages, with 180 workshops in four halls, each looking at a specific kind of art.

In the sculpture symposium, 21 sculptors from 13 countries used stone, wood, marble, iron and other natural products from the Kingdom to create a variety of artworks.
“Art is beautiful. You can relate to art in more than one way and from the moment you see the beauty of it,” Mohammed Al-Juaid, an organizer at Misk Art, said.
“But what makes this art unique is the materials. The artists used materials that came from our beloved land.” Meanwhile, artist Bodour Al-Bakri’s preferred form of expression was painting on people’s faces. Al-Bakri said that she wants to develop her idea and begin painting on bodies. She praised Misk Art Insititue, saying it offered her all the support needed to reach her artistic goals.


Worshippers flock to reopened Prophet’s Mosque for Friday prayers

Updated 06 June 2020

Worshippers flock to reopened Prophet’s Mosque for Friday prayers

MADINAH: Hundreds of thousands of worshippers attended the first Friday prayers to be held at the Prophet’s Mosque in Madinah since the gatherings were suspended to stop the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak.

The green light for the resumption of the prayer meetings came as part of a plan to gradually reopen the Kingdom’s mosques while ensuring worshippers and visitors adhered to preventive measures.

A ban on access to the Rawdah remained in place and only groups of worshippers numbering up to a maximum of 40 percent of the mosque’s capacity were being allowed entry.

Precautionary measures also included the allocation of specific doors for the entry of worshippers, the installation of thermal cameras, removal of all carpets so that prayers could be performed on the marble, sanitization of the mosque’s floors and courtyards, periodic opening of domes and canopies to ventilate the mosque, and the removal of Zamzam water containers.

The Prophet’s Mosque in Madinah will be closed after evening prayers and reopened one hour before dawn prayers. Parking lots will operate at 50 percent capacity and a media awareness campaign has been launched to highlight safety procedures at the holy site.

Medical teams have also been stationed at the main entrances to the mosque in cooperation with the Ministry of Health.

Elsewhere in the Kingdom, worshippers also flocked to perform Friday prayers at mosques amid strict health measures.

On May 31, Saudi authorities reopened all mosques for prayers, except in Makkah, as part of the Kingdom’s plan for a gradual return to normal life.

Last week the minister of Islamic affairs, dawah and guidance said that the country’s mosques were ready to welcome back worshippers, following his field trips to check that necessary preparations had been made.

All worshippers must still maintain a distance of 2 meters between rows, wear masks to enter a mosque, and Friday sermons and prayers have been limited to a maximum of 15 minutes.