Saudi designer’s humanitarian slant puts sheen on jewelry brand

Sheen combines artistry and social causes. (Supplied)
Updated 06 November 2019

Saudi designer’s humanitarian slant puts sheen on jewelry brand

DUBAI: All too often jewelry designers boast only of sparkling gold and attention-grabbing diamonds, so it is refreshing when humanitarian causes are at the heart of their creations.

Saudi designer Nosheen Bakhsh, founder of jewelry brand Sheen, is one such passionate example, combining her artistry for the Dubai-based label with social causes.




Most of her collections are in 18-karat gold with diamond precious and semi-precious stones. (Supplied)

Bakhsh, of Kashmiri origin, told Arab News: “The purpose (of moving into jewelry) was that I wanted to combine my passions. I wanted to come up with the perfect job. So that helped establish the founding principles of the brand: Design, culture and humanity.

“I knew that whatever I wanted to do needed to be creative. I needed a creative outlet, but I also wanted to give back somehow,” she added.

With every collection based on different cultures, Bakhsh selects a cause to receive a percentage of the proceeds from items sold. These have included the UN High Commissioner for Refugees’ Syria crisis appeal, the Rohingya emergency fund, the Doctors Without Borders medical organization, and the Revive Kashmir long-term economic development program.




The Triangle Diamond piece is from Bakhsh’s latest collection, Kenza. (Supplied)

Bakhsh’s latest collection, Kenza, which is derived from the Arabic word “Kenz” meaning treasure, was launched on Saudi National Day.

“It is inspired by the Gulf ... Considering all the changes that are happening in Saudi Arabia at the moment, and all the women that are doing great things in the UAE and Saudi, and that all being highlighted, I thought it was the right time to finally do a collection dedicated to the region,” she said.

For every collection, Bakhsh looks into the cultures’ heritage, and that has applied to her recent release.




Bakhsh launched her brand in 2013. 

“A few of the pieces are inspired by really old Khaleeji jewelry, which usually used to be very chunky and made in silver. But my take on it is still consistent with my style. It is very dainty and symmetrical, but a lot more intricate than what they had in the past.”

Bakhsh, with a background in advertising, launched her brand in 2013. Most of her collections are in 18-karat gold with diamond precious and semi-precious stones. She also experimented with silver in one of her older collections, Chandi.


‘Arabs Are Not Funny’ comedy show just the opposite

Taking the stage at London’s lavish Royal Albert Hall were mixed Arab-Western comedians. (Supplied)
Updated 22 February 2020

‘Arabs Are Not Funny’ comedy show just the opposite

LONDON: Don’t let the name fool you, Friday night’s “Arabs Are Not Funny” comedy show was filled with nothing but quick-witted, snarky and overly-relatable quips. 

Taking the stage at London’s lavish Royal Albert Hall were mixed Arab-Western comedians Wary Nichen, Leila Ladhari, Mamoun Elagab and Esther Manito, with Iraqi-Scottish Sezar Alkassab hosting. 

The sold-out show started off with the host forcing the zaghrouta (a long, wavering, high-pitched vocal sound of joy) out of the audience, after encouraging them to “laugh at our culture and enjoy yourself.”

Sudanese-Irishman Elagab, who was recently nominated for BBC New Comedian of the Year, kicked off the night with a comedic look back at his upbringing in the UK, dealing with extremists in class, and the struggle of explaining stand-up comedy to his Sudanese uncle.

The sold-out show started off with the host forcing the zaghrouta. (Supplied)

Lebanese-Brit Manito humored the audience with stories of the struggle of taking her British husband to Beirut to meet her relatives, raising two children as an Arab mom, and having her Lebanese father living with her family yelling and cursing at the TV and on the phone. 

Tunisian-Swiss-Austrian Ladhari joked about her boyfriend’s father trying to bond with her by trying to sympathize with Daesh and letting her know that he “too doesn’t like eating pork.”

The highlight of the night was Algerian-Frenchman Nichen, who spoke of his job as a fulltime immigrant and the racism he endures in daily life in Paris. 

The show was organized by Arts Canteen, an organization that curates and produces events, exhibitions and festivals that support emerging, mid-career and established artists from the Arab world and surrounding regions, bringing their work to new audiences in the UK and beyond.