US diplomat highlights benefits of Jeddah Consulate relocation

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Ryan Gliha, US Consul General. (AN photo by Huda Bashatah)
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Ryan Gliha, US Consul General. (AN photo by Huda Bashatah)
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Ryan Gliha, US Consul General. (AN photo by Huda Bashatah)
Updated 13 November 2019

US diplomat highlights benefits of Jeddah Consulate relocation

  • Move aims to increase cultural, educational outreach

JEDDAH: The relocation of the US Consulate in Jeddah is aimed at making its services more accessible to the people of the city and the region, and to increase educational and cultural outreach, US Consul General Ryan Gliha told Arab News.
“It was such a difficult thing for our guests to come to our old place (in Al-Hamra district), and part of the reason for that was we had to add several layers of security to the compound,” he said.
“Since it (the former consulate building) was built in the 1950s, it had different standards.”
The consulate’s new location is Al-Muhammadiyah district. “Part of the move is to make us more accessible to the people of Jeddah and the region,” Gliha said.
“Because of the accessibility, we’re going to have more opportunity to do more cultural outreach, educational outreach.”
A number of programs available at the new facility include the monthly English Conversation Hour, where people are invited to partake in discussions covering varied topics.
There is also the monthly movie series, where people can watch and discuss films.
In an effort to expand its outreach, Gliha spoke of the facility’s information resource library and student advice center, which provides services to students looking to head to the US for university and graduate school.

HIGHLIGHTS

• A number of programs are available at the new facility include the monthly English Conversation Hour.

• There is also the monthly movie series, where people can watch and discuss films.

• The facility’s information resource library and student advice center provide services to students looking to head to the US for university and graduate school.

• There are currently over 100,000 Saudis studying in the US across all 50 states.

There are currently over 100,000 Saudis studying in the US across all 50 states.
“Our hope is that we’re going to increase those numbers by quite a bit. We have a fulltime advisor who works with students to try to find the right university or college in the US,” Gliha said.
“We have almost 5,000 colleges and universities in the US, and it’s hard to make the right choice. We could help people zero in on the right choices if they want to go and travel there.”
The consulate has partnerships with several schools in Jeddah that benefit from this program.


Four Saudi students to compete at international science and engineering fair

Updated 5 min 41 sec ago

Four Saudi students to compete at international science and engineering fair

  • Intel ISEF is the world’s largest pre-college science competition
  • The four women from Jeddah were winners at the Kingdom’s National Olympiad for Scientific Creativity

RIYADH: Four Saudi students will represent the Kingdom at a major international science and engineering fair in the US later this year.

The four women from Jeddah were winners at the Kingdom’s National Olympiad for Scientific Creativity. They will be competing against more than 1,700 students from 77 countries at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (Intel ISEF) for more than $5 million in awards and scholarships.

The Saudi students traveling to Arizona in May are Dan Mohammed Al-Yafei and Tharaa Tariq Al-Dabbagh, who won an award at the olympiad in the field of science and the environment, and Lana Fahd Al-Abbasi and Zeina Tariq Maimani, who won in the field of physics and astronomy.

Intel ISEF is the world’s largest pre-college science competition and is an opportunity for young minds around the world to share ideas and showcase cutting-edge projects.

Intel ISEF says the winners are selected on their creative ability, scientific thought, as well as the thoroughness, skill and clarity shown in their projects.

Former Intel ISEF participant Wud Al-Saadoon won first place in the finals of the Kingdom’s National Olympiad for Scientific Creativity after working extensively on her project. She discovered her passion for science when she was in third grade, passing all aptitude tests for elementary, intermediate and high school and registering in Mawhiba enrichment programs starting from elementary school to high school.

“These programs allow students to enrol temporarily in a Saudi university,” she told Arab News. “This is how I participated as a high school student in the second olympiad program before I enrolled at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals.”

She specialized in renewable chemical energy and made a special device which won her third place in a local competition.

She then qualified for Intel ISEF, where she won fourth place in the field of chemical energy last year.