Saudi, Yemeni officials discuss relief projects

Saudi, Yemeni officials discuss relief projects
Dr. Abdullah Al-Rabeeah, KSRelief chief, and Abed Araqib Fateh, chairman of Yemen’s High Relief Committee, discuss ways to improve the istribution system in distributing relief aid in Yemen. (SPA)
Updated 14 November 2019

Saudi, Yemeni officials discuss relief projects

Saudi, Yemeni officials discuss relief projects

RIYADH: The supervisor general of the King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief), Dr. Abdullah Al-Rabeeah, met on Tuesday with Yemen’s Minister of Local Administration and Chairman of the High Relief Committee Abed Araqib Fateh.   

They discussed various humanitarian topics, including current relief operations in Yemen. Fateh thanked Saudi Arabia’s leadership and KSRelief for the impartial humanitarian support being provided to all Yemenis in need.

He said during the meeting, discussions took place about KSRelief’s “plans to support the humanitarian situation in Yemen, both in the field of emergency relief and economic recovery.”

They also discussed KSRelief’s volunteer surgical campaigns for heart and eye disease treatment in Hadramout, and talked about ways to strengthen these campaigns.

The center is continuing to implement a water and sanitation program in Hodeidah and Naham governorates, benefiting 34,614 people.

Meanwhile, the emergency medical nutrition clinics of KSRelief are continuing to provide medical services in those governorates, in partnership with the Taibah Development Foundation.

This comes within the framework of humanitarian and relief projects being provided by Saudi Arabia, represented by KSRelief, to the Yemeni people to improve their living conditions during the current humanitarian crisis.

The center also delivered 30 tons of medicines and various medical supplies to the Health and Population Office in Shabwah governorate.

The governorate’s Undersecretary Dr. Abdulqawi Lamrouk praised KSRelief’s roles in supporting Shabwah’s health sector. He also expressed his appreciation for the Saudi leadership’s support of Yemen.

Meanwhile, KSRelief has completed the distribution of school bags and stationery to the children of Syrian refugees in Azraq camp in Jordan, benefiting 8,000 students in 15 schools for boys and girls.

 

 

 


Fraudsters up their game, posing as bank officials on the phone in Saudi Arabia

Fraudsters up their game, posing as bank officials on the phone in Saudi Arabia
Vishing that occurs during a telephone call aims to provoke fear in the victim so that customers will be more susceptible to giving out personal, financial, or security details. (shutterstock)
Updated 18 January 2021

Fraudsters up their game, posing as bank officials on the phone in Saudi Arabia

Fraudsters up their game, posing as bank officials on the phone in Saudi Arabia
  • The Saudi Central Bank has warned bank customers, both citizens and expatriates, not to fall victim to financial frauds being perpetrated by scammers

JEDDAH: Fraudsters have developed a new scam, contacting residents in Saudi Arabia and pretending to be bank staffers requesting customer details.
A number of Arab News staff have received such calls in recent weeks. One caller spoke Urdu while two other callers posing as senior officials from the headquarters of the bank spoke in English and Arabic with a local accent.
They used phone numbers that appeared to be local numbers but upon calling back, the lines failed to connect.
The racketeers collect phone numbers of customers and ring them up, saying that their bank account or ATM card requires immediate updating. The scammers use the information provided to gain access to their bank accounts.
Speaking to Arab News, Talat Zaki Hafiz, secretary-general of the Media and Banking Awareness Committee of Saudi banks, said: “Saudi banks represented by the Media and Banking Awareness Committee have repeatedly warned bank customers not to react to stray phone calls of any kind coming from unknown sources that ask to update their banking record or personal information.” He further confirmed that banks do not request such information through phone calls or SMS messages.
Mohammed Khurram Khan, a professor of cybersecurity at the King Saud University in Riyadh, told Arab News: “Phishing, an online scam which targets users through emails where individuals are encouraged to click on a link that takes them to fraudulent sites, was troubling people. Now it’s a different kind of scam known as ‘vishing,’ over-the-phone phishing, where scammers persuade users to share their banking information by impersonating a bank official.”

HIGHLIGHT

The racketeers collect phone numbers of customers and ring them up, saying that their bank account or ATM card requires immediate updating. The scammers use the information provided to gain access to their bank accounts.

Vishing that occurs during a telephone call aims to provoke fear in the victim so that customers will be more susceptible to giving out personal, financial, or security details.
Sharing his experience Zafar Hasan, an e-learning consultant in Riyadh, said: “I received a call from someone on an unknown mobile number who introduced himself as a bank employee and told me that my ATM card was going to be blocked. It required an immediate update so I should give my Iqama number (residence permit number) and sixteen-digit ATM card number. I felt something was fishy, so I told him that I would go personally to the bank to update the card.”
The Saudi Central Bank (SAMA) has warned bank customers, both citizens and expatriates, not to fall victim to financial frauds being perpetrated by scammers.
SAMA called on bank customers to take information only from the official channels of the bodies regulating the Kingdom’s financial and investment sectors and inform the competent security authorities about such fraudulent attempts.