Investors back global online market-place for ethical green farmers

A woman collects strawberries at a farm in Thailand. (Reuters)
Updated 20 November 2019

Investors back global online market-place for ethical green farmers


 KUALA LUMPUR: A former investment banker has raised more than $10 million to expand a startup that helps developing-nation farmers using green and ethical methods to earn more by linking them directly with food buyers around the world.

After a decade investing in commodity markets at Deutsche Bank and Korea Investment Corporation, Hoshik Shin set up online marketplace Tridge in 2015 to build a network of sustainable producers and link them to buyers at home and abroad.

Food sold on Tridge includes peppermint leaves from Egypt, peanuts farmed in Nigeria and mangoes grown in India and Thailand. “At the moment, suppliers in emerging countries are so restricted to just meeting local buyers,” said the South Korean entrepreneur, whose venture secured $10.5 million this month from investors to bolster the business.

“Through our platform, they can meet foreign buyers more easily ... prices will improve and that gives bigger benefits to both farmers and their employees,” Shin told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Tridge users include the world’s largest retailer Walmart Inc and French supermarket chain Carrefour, said Shin.

Globally, consumers and retailers are demanding more information about the goods they source, buy and eat, to make sure their production and transportation does not damage the environment, or use illegal and unethical business practices.

In response, manufacturers of household brands, restaurants and other businesses are seeking to attract more customers by offering products guaranteed free of deforestation or slave labour, for example. Earlier this year, conservation group WWF launched a website that harnesses blockchain technology allowing users to scan a QR code on a product or menu revealing its full history and supply chain.

Seoul-based Tridge makes use of artificial intelligence, data and algorithms, and has about 80 employees in 40 countries verifying that suppliers are trustworthy and ethical.

Food sellers on the platform, who are based in about 150 countries, can cut out middlemen and traders along the supply chain, who often take a cut and push up prices.

“The buyers get cheaper sourcing, and the supplier can get a better selling price,” said Shin.

Once linked, producers and their customers can do business away from the website, with suppliers paying Tridge for the connection.


Riyadh to host next World Economic Forum regional summit

Updated 32 min 39 sec ago

Riyadh to host next World Economic Forum regional summit

  • The theme of the meeting will be the place of the region in the fourth industrial revolution
  • Middle East WEF’s in the past have been staged in Egypt, Jordan and some have been held in the UAE

DAVOS: Saudi Arabia will host the next Middle East summit of the World Economic Forum, the first time the Kingdom has staged the prestigious meeting of world leaders, it was announced in Davos on Thursday.

Borge Brende, the WEF president, told delegates: “The next Middle East summit will be held in Saudi Arabia on the 5 and 6 of April this year.”

The theme of the meeting will be the place of the region in the fourth industrial revolution, according to a posting on the official WEF website.

Middle East WEF’s in the past have been staged in Egypt, Jordan and some have been held in the UAE.

The announcement was made at a special meeting at Davos to consider the strategic priorities for Saudi Arabia as it prepares to stage the G20 meeting of world leaders in the Kingdom in November, the first time the power-summit has been held in the Middle East.