Saudi flag emblazoned on world’s tallest tower to honor Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman UAE visit

Saudi flag emblazoned on world’s tallest tower to honor Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman UAE visit
Stand at 829 meters high, Burj Khalifa was light in the colours of the green Saudi flag with the white Arabic calligraphic and sword. (Dubai Media Office)
Updated 28 November 2019

Saudi flag emblazoned on world’s tallest tower to honor Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman UAE visit

Saudi flag emblazoned on world’s tallest tower to honor Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman UAE visit
  • Opened in 2010, the tower is one of Dubai’s iconic landmarks and is usually lit up to celebrate various occasions

DUBAI: The Saudi flag was emblazoned on the world's tallest tower to celebrate the official visit of Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohamed bin Salman to the United Arab Emirates on Wednesday.                                                                                                                                                                

Stand at 829 meters high, Burj Khalifa was light in the colours of the green Saudi flag with the white Arabic calligraphic and sword.

Opened in 2010, the tower is one of Dubai’s iconic landmarks and is usually lit up to celebrate various occasions. Earlier this week the tower was lit in orange to mark “Elimination of Violence Against Women Day.”


TWITTER POLL: WhatsApp users undecided whether to continue using app or switching to other options

TWITTER POLL: WhatsApp users undecided whether to continue using app or switching to other options
Updated 15 January 2021

TWITTER POLL: WhatsApp users undecided whether to continue using app or switching to other options

TWITTER POLL: WhatsApp users undecided whether to continue using app or switching to other options
  • The Facebook-owned messaging service has issued a new privacy policy

DUBAI: WhatsApp users are generally undecided whether to continue using the app or consider switching to other available options, an Arab News poll showed.

The Facebook-owned messaging service has issued a new privacy policy, which some reports claimed would share users’ data without giving them a choice, something that 29.7 percent of the poll respondents said they would accept.

Meanwhile, about 38.8 percent of those who answered the poll said they would decline the new privacy policy and switch to other apps while 31.5 percent were undecided on what to do with the WhatsApp app installed in their phones.

Alternative messaging services such as Signal and Telegram meanwhile benefited from the negative press that WhatsApp received, both receiving subscriber boost in just a few days.

Signal in particular added a whopping 4.6 million new users right after receiving an endorsement from technology mogul Elon Musk.

Unlike WhatsApp, which shares user data with Facebook, Signal has a history of fighting any entity that asks for private data and adds features to further anonymize users where possible.

Telegram, which is currently No. 2 behind Signal on the App Store, saw more than 25 million new users sign up in just the last few days.

The mistrust over WhatsApp’s updated privacy policy may also affect its ambitions in India, its biggest market, where 400 million users exchange more messages on the platform.

The backlash forced it to undertake advertising blitz costing tens of millions of rupees in at least 10 English and Hindi newspapers.