Boko Haram kill 19 Nigeria herders in clashes

Boko Haram have been raiding herding communities, seizing cattle — a valuable commodity in the region — to fund their operations. (File/AFP)
Short Url
Updated 15 December 2019

Boko Haram kill 19 Nigeria herders in clashes

  • The fighting sparked outside Fuhe village, close to the border with Cameroon
  • The herders tried to repel an earlier attack by the militia and killed one of them

KANO, Nigeria: Boko Haram militants gunned down 19 cattle herders Saturday in northeast Nigeria, civilian militia sources and residents told AFP on Sunday.
Ethnic Fulani herders, besieged by a spate of armed attacks targeting their cattle, pursued Boko Haram, sparking a fierce gunfight outside Fuhe village, near Ngala close to the border with Cameroon.
“The insurgents killed 19 of the herdsmen in the fight,” a militia leader Umar Kachalla told AFP.
Bodies of the slain herders were brought to the police by militiamen, Kachalla said.
The herders had earlier repelled an attack by Boko Haram fighters who invaded the village to steal livestock, killing one of the militants, Mada said.
The herders then decided to pursue the militia and fight them “once and for all,” Mada said, but were overwhelmed.
“The herdsmen were subdued by the better armed Boko Haram gunmen,” he said.
Militants then returned to Fuhe village and burnt homes and food supplies while herds fled, according to Ngala resident Abubakar Yusuf, who saw the dead bodies at the police station.
Boko Haram has increasingly targeted farmers, herders and loggers, accusing them of spying and passing information to the military and the local militia fighting them.
They have also been raiding herding communities, seizing cattle — a valuable commodity in the region — to fund their operations.
Boko Haram and rival Islamic State West Africa Province (ISWAP) are known to operate in areas around Ngala and the neighboring town of Gamboru.
ISWAP has focused on targeting military installations and troops since 2018 while Boko Haram faction is notorious for indiscriminate attacks on civilians.
However, ISWAP has been blamed for a recent increase in attacks on civilians.
In August 2014 Boko Haram seized Ngala and Gamboru, a trading hub, but Nigerian troops retook both towns in September 2015 with the help of the Chadian military.
Despite the recapture of the area, militants continue to launch sporadic attacks, ambushing troops and vehicles, as well as attacking and abducting farmers.
In November last year Boko Haram abducted around 50 loggers at Bulakesa village outside Gamboru.
The decade-long conflict has killed 35,000 people and displaced around two million from their homes.
The violence has spread to neighboring Niger, Chad and Cameroon, prompting the formation of a regional military coalition to fight the militants.


Civilians, soldiers clash leaving 127 dead in South Sudan

Updated 12 August 2020

Civilians, soldiers clash leaving 127 dead in South Sudan

  • The violence in Tonj began after several armed youths got into a disagreement with soldiers
  • An initial armed confrontation was brought under control, but local youths subsequently mobilized for an attack on the army position

JUBA: Clashes between soldiers and civilians during a disarmament exercise in the central South Sudanese town of Tonj have left 127 dead, the army spokesman said Wednesday.
Major General Lul Ruai Koang told AFP that the fighting erupted on Saturday as security forces carried out an operation to disarm civilians in the area which has seen deadly inter-communal clashes.
More than six years after a civil war broke out in the country, and in the absence of a functioning government, many communities are flush with weapons, which they keep for protection or defense against cattle raids.
The violence in Tonj began after several armed youths got into a disagreement with soldiers. An initial armed confrontation was brought under control, but according to Koang the youths mobilized others for an attack on the army position.
“On the latest, the number of those killed, I can confirm to you that it rose to 127,” Koang said, adding that 45 of those killed were security forces and 82 were youths from the area.
A further 32 soldiers were injured.
Koang said two military officers involved in “triggering the clashes” had been arrested, and that the situation in Tonj had calmed down.
South Sudan is emerging from a six-year civil war that left 380,000 dead and millions displaced, and disarmament is a major stumbling block.
Experts have warned against operations that coerce people to lay down their guns without proper planning, as some communities could find themselves unable to protect themselves after their weapons are removed.
“The clashes should be an opportunity to rethink the approach to disarmament. What is the point of removing guns without addressing what drives folks to arms themselves?” Geoffrey Duke, head of the South Sudan Action Network on Small Arms, said on Twitter.
“We can take guns away this week & they buy a new one next week (as) long as they still see the need to have (one).”