Bamiyan gov. claims Soleimani successor used false identity to visit Afghanistan

Ismail Qaani, left, the newly appointed commander of Iran’s Revolutionary Guards’ in a meeting with the governor of Bamiyan in the province of Bamiyan on July 11, 2018. (Source: Bamyan Province Facebook official page)
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Updated 09 January 2020

Bamiyan gov. claims Soleimani successor used false identity to visit Afghanistan

  • Governor: Introduced himself as deputy ambassador of Iran using last name Ismail
  • Afghan Foreign Ministry investigating the visit

KABUL: The newly appointed commander of Iran’s Revolutionary Guards’ Quds Force, General Ismail Qaani, travelled to Afghanistan’s central province of Bamiyan using a false identity last year, the governor of the province said on Thursday.

Qaani, 62, was appointed by Iran’s supreme leader, Ali Khamenei, who issued a statement praising his role as a prominent commander in the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps. As a key branch of the military organization, the country’s most powerful security organ, the Quds Force carries out the Iranian military’s special operations abroad.

Qaani takes over from Qassem Soleimani, the architect of Tehran’s overseas clandestine and military operations, who was killed on Friday in a US air strike on his convoy at Baghdad airport.

Tahir Zaheer, the governor of Afghanistan’s rugged central province of Bamiyan said last year that Qaani and eight other Iranians travelled to Bamiyan in a small airplane. The general introduced himself as deputy ambassador of Iran to Kabul and used the last name Ismaili, Zaheer said.

“The esteemed (Afghan) foreign ministry needs to find out as to how he was given visa, under what name and what sort of passport,” Zaheer told Arab News.

Zaheer said Qaani visited Bamiyan to restart construction work on an Iran-funded 120-bed hospital, where work had come to a halt in recent months.

Afghanistan and Iran share a border. Afghanistan has a sizeable Shia population and many followers of the sect have reportedly been recruited by the Quds Force in recent years to fight in Iraq and Syria.

On Tuesday, the Afghan Foreign Ministry said Qaani had never served as a diplomat in Afghanistan.

Acting Minister of Foreign Affairs Idrees Zaman said Qaani’s visit was being investigated but it was clear that he “never served as deputy ambassador.”


If you’re happy and you know it, tidy up: Seoul guru explains the key to decluttering

Updated 19 min 27 sec ago

If you’re happy and you know it, tidy up: Seoul guru explains the key to decluttering

  • “My focus of tidying up is not throwing away but organizing for space,” said Jung
  • Jung enjoys a huge fan base on social media - one video on how to clean a dresser was watched 1.2 million times

SEOUL: Keep it if it makes you happy, South Korea’s tidying consultant Jung Hee-sook tells her clients as the first step for a less cluttered and more meaningful life.
“I feel most rewarded when my clients say they live happier lives after decluttering their houses,” Jung, 49, told Arab News.
It was not an easy journey to begin with she says, reminiscing about the start of her career in 2012.
“My job was often regarded as merely part of cleaning work. Tidying up is such a meaningful job that can help others in need and help people to live better,” she added.
Eight years on, she has decluttered 2,000 homes and counting, and says for that to happen it’s imperative to “read the client first.”
She cites the example of a woman who was determined to tidy up her home, not to give it a makeover but to “make life easier for her family.”
“When I visited her house, I noticed the lights dimming and curtains were still drawn. I got the sense that this family had some problems. During consulting, I learnt that the client was going blind. She wanted to tidy up her home before losing her sight to help her husband find items easily for their child,” Jung said, adding that it was one of her “most rewarding experiences.”
Often compared to Marie Kondo, the Japanese author of “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying” who enjoys a massive following across the world, Jung says her approach to tidying is different from the one propagated by Kondo, who places a priority on getting rid of anything that does not “spark joy.”
“My focus of tidying up is not throwing away but organizing for space,” said Jung, who has written two books on the topic, “Smart Tidying Ways” and “The Best Interior is in Organizing.” “You can keep your items if you don’t want to throw them away, but the bottom line is you have to organize them for use instead of leaving them unattended or stacked up in the corner.”


South Korea seems to be listening.
Jung enjoys a huge fan base on social media — one video from November last year on how to clean a dresser was watched 1.2 million times on YouTube — while her high-profile clients include CEOs and celebrities such as K-POP girl group Mamamoo’s Hwasa.
Experts point to the country’s unique concept of “jeong” to explain Jung’s popularity.
“It’s like an old grandmother piling plate upon plate of food in front of their grandchild to the point where they feel they might burst,” said Kwak Keum-joo, professor of psychology at the Seoul National University, explaining the national “attachment to objects.”
He said that the majority of people lay great emphasis on materialistic stuff as a benchmark of social status.
Jung agrees. “Korean people possess things to show off their wealth or social reputation. Most distinctively, they feel an attachment to objects,” she said.
Changes in consumer behavior, Kwak said, are also a key factor for the rising trends of house decluttering as well.
“In the past, most Koreans were brought up to save money and conserve things, but now they’re spending money if they have it, and they can purchase things fast and conveniently online at any time,” she said.
Jung says the coronavirus pandemic and subsequent lockdown helped to accelerate the decluttering process as well.
“People were staying home longer than before and paying more attention to tidying up their spaces at homes,” she said.
Jung’s top tip for starting is to take everything out and prioritize items based on their usage or emotional attachment.
“The thing is to sort out items and put them in separate spaces. People think it looks clean when you don’t see objects, but real organizing means sorting out the hidden things,” she said.
Next, Jung wants to take her teachings to the rest of the world.
“I hope to establish the right culture of decluttering to make people’s lives happier, not just in South Korea but in foreign countries as well. I am confident that the life of my clients has changed for the better after decluttering their houses.”