King Abdullah of Jordan warns Daesh on the rise again

King Abdullah of Jordan warns Daesh on the rise again
King Abdullah of Jordan also said in the TV channel France 24 interview ‘we can’t afford instability in our part of the world.’ (AFP)
Updated 13 January 2020

King Abdullah of Jordan warns Daesh on the rise again

King Abdullah of Jordan warns Daesh on the rise again
  • ‘... we have seen over the past year the re-establishment and rise of Isis, not only in southern eastern Syria but also in western Iraq’
  • Many foreign fighters from Syria were now in Libya

PARIS: King Abdullah of Jordan on Monday warned that the Daesh group was regrouping and was once again on the rise in the Middle East.
Months after the ousting of Daesh last year from their last Syrian holdout, Abdullah said his “major concern is that we have seen over the past year the re-establishment and rise of Isis, not only in southern eastern Syria but also in western Iraq.
“We have to deal with the reemergence of Isis,” the king added in an interview with TV channel France 24 ahead of talks this week in Brussels, Strasbourg and Paris. He also said many foreign fighters from Syria were now in Libya.
“From a European perspective, with Libya being much closer to Europe, this is going to be an important discussion in the next couple of days,” Abdullah said.
“Several thousand fighters have left Idlib (Syria) through the northern border and have ended up in Libya, that is something that we in the region but also our European friends will have to address in 2020.”
Regarding last week’s spiking of tensions between Iran and the United States, Abdullah said he hoped that “in the next several months we set the right tone for the region, which is really to bring the temperature down.”
“So far it looks like de-escalation, we hope that that continues to be the trend. We can’t afford instability in our part of the world.
“Whatever happens in Tehran will affect Baghdad, Amman, Beirut, the Israeli Palestinian process.”
Abdullah added that the recent deployment of Turkish troops in a training capacity to Libya “will only create more confusion” in the country.
Both sides in Libya’s conflict agreed to a cease-fire from Sunday to end nine months of fighting, following weeks of international diplomacy and calls for a truce by power-brokers Russia and Turkey.
A UN report in November said several countries were violating the arms embargo on Libya in place since the overthrow of Muammar Qaddafi in 2011.
Jordan, whose stability is seen as vital for the volatile Middle East, hosts some 1.3 million refugees from neighboring war-torn Syria.


Iranian missiles land close to ship, 100 miles from US aircraft carrier strike group in Indian Ocean

Iranian missiles land close to ship, 100 miles from US aircraft carrier strike group in Indian Ocean
Updated 15 min 23 sec ago

Iranian missiles land close to ship, 100 miles from US aircraft carrier strike group in Indian Ocean

Iranian missiles land close to ship, 100 miles from US aircraft carrier strike group in Indian Ocean
  • At least two other Iranian ballistic missiles exploded on impact when they hit the ocean
  • Nimitz has remained in the northern Arabian Sea on the orders of outgoing President Donald Trump

LONDON: Long-range Iranian missiles rained down dangerously close to a commercial ship in the Indian Ocean on Saturday and 100 miles from the US Nimitz aircraft carrier strike group, Fox News reported. 

US officials, who wished to remain anonymous, said that at least one of the missiles landed 20 miles from the commercial vessel.

At least two other Iranian ballistic missiles exploded on impact when they hit the ocean, about 100 miles away from the USS Nimitz aircraft carrier strike group.

Shards of debris flew in all directions on impact, the US news channel said. 

"We were expecting the missile launch," an official told Fox News, but there was concern about just how close Iran was willing to push its limits. 

Nimitz has remained in the northern Arabian Sea on the orders of outgoing President Donald Trump.

The Pentagon changed its mind and ordered the Nimitz to turn around and remain in the region earlier this month after it left the Arabian Gulf and was due to return home.

“Due to the recent threats issued by Iranian leaders against President Trump and other US government officials, I have ordered the USS Nimitz to halt its routine redeployment,” Acting Secretary of Defense Chris Miller said on January 3. 

“The USS Nimitz will now remain on station in the US Central Command area of operations.”

January 3 marked the one-year anniversary of the assassination of Qasem Soleimani, the head of Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC).

The Islamic Republic has vowed to avenge the general’s death.