AS IT HAPPENS: Davos 2020 Day Four – global economy, climate change, and digital future

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Updated 24 January 2020

AS IT HAPPENS: Davos 2020 Day Four – global economy, climate change, and digital future

  • Discussions on the digital world, environment, and gender are set for today

It is the last day of the World Economic Forum 2020 today in Davos, Switzerland, where world leaders are gathered to talk about global issues including technology, health, business and economics.

Discussions on the digital world, environment, and gender are set for today. United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres is speaking in one of the sessions.

Follow our coverage here:

16:00 - Børge Brende, President of World Economic Forum, takes the podium to give his closing remarks, after four days of jampacked agenda.

He enumerated the important deals and agreements made throughout the forum, and ended his speech referring to the ongoing crisis in China with the coronavirus.

"Last, but extremely important, CEPI (the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations) today announced three programmes to develop vaccines against the Coronavirus," he said.

14:00 - As the Forum draws to a close, a panel discussion on the outlook of global economy opens.

On stage are Steven Mnuchin, US Secretary of the Treasury; Olaf Scholz, Vice-Chancellor and Federal Minister of Finance of Germany; Kristalina Georgieva, Managing Director, International Monetary Fund; Haruhiko Kuroda, Governor, Bank of Japan; Christine Lagarde, President, European Central Bank.




A session titled "Global Ecnomic Outlook" at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. (Screengrab)

IMF's Georgiva opens the discussion with a positive note on economic growth globally.

"We are projecting growth this year at 3.3 percent, next year at 3.4 percent - this is clearly an improvement vis-a-vis the record low of last year at 2.9 percent,” she said.

 

 

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12:15 - Health and medical experts talk about cancer care and treatment, and it's future.

 

 

One of the panelists, Shamsheer Vayalil, Chairman and Managing Director of VPS Healthcare, said "There is a social aspect of cancer care. There are people who cannot get basic access to care, so we have a lot of social responsibility."


Five dead, three missing after Jakarta floods

Updated 26 February 2020

Five dead, three missing after Jakarta floods

  • The muddy deluge inundated the presidential palace, a major hospital and entire neighborhoods across Jakarta on Tuesday
  • Floodwaters reached more than a meter (three feet) in some parts of the capital but were receding by Wednesday

JAKARTA: Five people were killed, three more are missing and thousands are unable to return to their waterlogged homes after floods submerged parts of Indonesia’s capital, officials said Wednesday.

The muddy deluge inundated the presidential palace, a major hospital and entire neighborhoods across Jakarta on Tuesday, only weeks after 70 residents of the low-lying megacity died in some of the deadliest flooding in memory.

Two teenagers were among the five people drowned or electrocuted in hard-hit parts of the city, Indonesia’s national disaster agency said.

“The joint rescue team is still searching” for three other possible victims, agency spokesman Agus Wibowo told AFP, adding that nearly 20,000 people were staying in emergency shelters.

Floodwaters reached more than a meter (three feet) in some parts of the capital but were receding by Wednesday, a day after rescuers combed drenched districts in pontoon boats to locate vulnerable residents.

Parts of the city had ground to a halt as thousands of buildings were swamped, sparking power outages and disrupting commuter trains.

Jakarta, a sprawling city beleaguered by massive traffic jams and poor infrastructure, is prone to flooding during the annual wet season.

Indonesian president Joko Widodo last year unveiled plans to relocate the capital to an as yet unbuilt city on Borneo island.