Thought leaders meet in UAE for Milken Institute economic summit

Michael Milken
Short Url
Updated 11 February 2020

Thought leaders meet in UAE for Milken Institute economic summit

  • Over two days there will be discussion panels on renewable energy, the new age of consumerism, and the future of banking

DUBAI: Thought leaders and decision-makers will meet in Abu Dhabi on Tuesday to thrash out solutions to some of the world’s most pressing challenges.

More than 1,000 business executives, investors, government officials and philanthropists will discuss trade, capital markets, financial inclusion, food security, job creation and gender parity at the Milken Institute’s 2020 Middle East and Africa Summit.

Over two days there will be discussion panels on renewable energy, the new age of consumerism, the future of banking, the convergence of big tech and national security, workforce development and entrepreneurial investment.

Speakers include Mariam Almheiri, UAE minister of state for food security; Paul Ryan, the former US House of Representatives Speaker; Dina Powell of Goldman Sachs; Raymond Dalio of Bridgewater Associates; and Mohammed Al-Shaya of AlShaya Group.

SPEEDREAD

More than 1,000 business executives, investors, government officials and philanthropists will discuss trade, capital markets, financial inclusion, food security, job creation and gender parity at the Milken Institute’s 2020 Middle East and Africa Summit.

Michael Milken, chairman of the Milken Institute, an economic think tank in California, will take part in discussions with Khaldoon Al-Mubarak, head of the Mubadala Investment Company, and Rajeev Misra, chief executive of SoftBank Investment Advisers.

Summit delegates will review the Global Opportunity Index report, a Milken Institute annual assessment of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries’ development in 2019.

The report considers economic and financial factors that influence foreign investment activities, as well as business, legal and regulatory policies that governments use to drive investment. It also compares the Gulf states’ performance with those of upper-middle-income countries, and their performance on economic fundamentals, financial services, business perception, institutional framework, and international standards and policy.

 


Syria Kurdish-led force launches new anti-Daesh campaign

Updated 05 June 2020

Syria Kurdish-led force launches new anti-Daesh campaign

  • Operations will focus on the vast east Syria desert near the border with Iraq

BEIRUT: US-backed Kurdish fighters in Syria announced Friday a fresh campaign to hunt down remnants of the Daesh group near the Iraqi border following a recent uptick in attacks.
The Syrian Democratic Forces, a Kurdish-led paramilitary alliance that has spearheaded the ground fight against Daesh in Syria since 2015, said that the new campaign is being carried out in coordination with the Iraqi army and the US-led coalition.
“This campaign will target ISIS’s hideouts and hotbeds,” it said, using a different acronym for the militant group.
It said operations will focus on the vast east Syria desert near the border with Iraq where Daesh has conducted a spate of attacks in recent months.
Since the loss of its last territory in Syria in March 2019, Daesh attacks have been restricted to the vast desert that stretches from the heavily populated Orontes valley in the west all the way to Iraqi border.
It regularly targets SDF forces and has vowed to seek revenge for the defeat of its so-called “caliphate”.
The SDF, with backing from its coalition allies, launched a campaign to hunt down sleeper cells after it forced Daesh militants out of their last Syrian redoubt in the desert hamlet of Baghouz in March 2019.
A raid in October by US special forces killed Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the leader of the militant group which once controlled large swathes of territory in both Iraq and Syria.
Last month, the United Nations accused the Daesh group and others in Syria of exploiting the COVID-19 pandemic to step up violence on civilians, describing the situation as a “ticking time-bomb”.
Across the border in Iraq, Daesh has exploited a coronavirus lockdown, coalition troop withdrawals and simmering political disputes to ramp up attacks.
Iraq declared Daesh defeated in late 2017 but sleeper cells have survived in remote northern and western areas, where security gaps mean the group wages occasional attacks.
They have spiked since early April as militants plant explosives, shoot up police patrols and launch mortar and rocket fire at villages.